House of Commons Hansard #111 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was public.

Topics

National Security
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I do not think we need those legislative hearings now because he covered everything that they were going to say in them.

The reality is, dealing with just one of the many things he suggested there, Ms. Couillard is not a candidate and has never been a candidate for the Conservative Party. She is not even a member of the Conservative Party.

National Security
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, I wonder if it is private or public interest here.

Let us cut to the chase here. There were security breaches. There was ample warning and yet the government ignored every clue it got.

Given her connections to organized crime and biker gangs, did the government ever wonder whose ambition Ms. Couillard was serving? First, foreign affairs and now public works. What is the Prime Minister waiting for? When will he call a full public inquiry?

National Security
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, the government is responding in an appropriate fashion to the matters that have been raised here. The Department of Foreign Affairs is conducting a review into the one matter of concern that is legitimate here and that was the question of classified documents being left in an unsecured place. We look forward to it completing that work.

Copyright
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Bruce Stanton Simcoe North, ON

Mr. Speaker, we know that copyright reform in Canada is long overdue. Canadian consumers need to have reasonable use of the latest technologies without fear of infringing copyright law. Under the current laws, Canadians run the risk of being sued for the everyday use of the products and services that they buy.

Could the Minister of Industry confirm to the House that the bill he tabled today ensures that Canadian consumers will no longer be treated like criminals for the everyday use of things like time shifting their television programs or copying CD music to their iPods?

Copyright
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, as has been promised previously, this bill seeks to strike a balance between consumers and their rights on the one hand, and on the other hand those who are creators in our society. It is an important bill.

I would point out that it has been well received. There is positive commentary that has been extensive at this point about the introduction of the bill. The Canadian Chamber of Commerce, the Entertainment Software Association of Canada, the Business Software Alliance, ACTRA, the Canadian Film and Television Production Association, the Canadian Publishers' Council, the Canadian Intellectual Property Council have all welcomed the introduction of the bill.

Omar Khadr
Oral Questions

June 12th, 2008 / 2:45 p.m.

NDP

Wayne Marston Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadian Omar Khadr has been detained by U.S. officials for 2053 days. He has been interrogated countless times. The first charges did not stick, so the U.S. military created a new charge. His trial was cancelled, rescheduled, then the judge was replaced, all with evidence mounting that the United States simply is not telling the truth about the circumstances of Mr. Khadr's arrest.

I want an unequivocal answer from the government. Does it agree with the U.S. supreme court and others associated with the case that the Bush administration's Guantanamo Bay process is illegal?

Omar Khadr
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, we do not comment on the judicial process of another country, but what is important to understand is that Mr. Khadr faces some very serious charges regarding terrorism.

The Government of Canada strongly believes that the fight against terrorism must be carried out in compliance with international law including the established standards of human rights and due process.

Omar Khadr
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Wayne Marston Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, ON

That is repeated empty spin, Mr. Speaker.

Six French nationals were released by the U.S. to France in 2004 and 2005; British national Moazzam Begg was released in January 2005; Murat Kurnaz, a Turkish-German, was released in August, 2006; and Australian David Hicks was released in April, 2007. Omar Khadr is the only western detainee left. He must come home to Canada.

There are many recommendations on the way this can be done. The only question that remains is, when will the Prime Minister bring Omar Khadr home?

Omar Khadr
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, as I have stated on numerous occasions, Mr. Khadr faces very serious charges in relation to his capture in Afghanistan. Any questions regarding Mr. Khadr's return to Canada are premature and speculative, as the legal process and appeals are still going on.

Omar Khadr
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, on this same point.

The United States supreme court today, in a five to four ruling, said clearly that habeas corpus applied in the United States and that the detention of several of the detainees in Guantanamo Bay did not meet the standards of the United States constitution.

It is a very simple question for the government today. Just what is it going to take for the government to understand that Omar Khadr should face justice in Canada and not in Guantanamo Bay? That is what should happen.

Omar Khadr
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, we do not comment on any questions regarding another country's judicial process, but I would like to say to the former NDP leader of Ontario that he can ask his leader what was his government's policy because this policy was initiated when his leader was in the cabinet of the previous government.

Omar Khadr
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, today's decision by the U.S. Supreme Court is the court's third decision unequivocally stipulating that human rights must be respected. It is clear that Mr. Khadr's rights have been violated. He was 15 years old when he was arrested.

Now, we are sending a clear message to this government that Mr. Khadr must be tried under the Canadian justice system and Canadian laws, and not under an illegal procedure in the United States.

Omar Khadr
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, Canada strongly believes that the fight against terrorism must be carried out in compliance with international law, including established standards of human rights and due process. That is the Government of Canada's position. Mr. Khadr faces very serious charges of terrorism.

However, let me just say the government is following the same policy that the previous government established in 2002.

Regional Economic Development
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec has not convinced us that his decision to cut funding to not for profit organizations was well founded. Neither his provincial counterpart nor Quebec's business community were dazzled by the wisdom of his decision. Perhaps we are not addressing the right person. The minister told us that it was his cabinet colleagues who forced his hand.

Could the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, the Prime Minister's Quebec lieutenant, tell us which organizations will be affected in his region, which is also my region?

Regional Economic Development
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, as I said earlier, we have given $1.6 billion to the Government of Quebec over the past year. That is even more money in the pockets of the Government of Quebec and we were the ones to give it to them. Of that money, $242 million went to Quebec's Minister of Economic Development, Innovation and Export Trade. We took that money out of our own coffers in order to give it to the Government of Quebec, and now that government is criticizing us.

We will continue to support economic organizations, but we will focus on one-off projects that have a start, a middle and an end.