House of Commons Hansard #94 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was autism.

Topics

Federal Appointments
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Simms Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—Windsor, NL

Mr. Speaker, the government is fixated on rewarding Conservative loyalty. The minister's answer and the ongoing political patronage saga is indeed an insult to Canadians who took the Conservatives at their word to abolish this type of behaviour.

Where is this public appointments commission they promised that would set standards for federal cabinet appointments? There were 37 Conservative appointments in just six weeks.

It has been almost four years. When will the Conservatives practise what they used to preach? Do it now.

Federal Appointments
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

North Vancouver
B.C.

Conservative

Andrew Saxton Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, I categorically reject, not only the premise but also the substance of the hon. member's question.

All appointments by this government are subject to rigorous scrutiny. The appointments in question went to extremely qualified candidates. Our appointment process is open, transparent and competency based.

The government will continue to appoint individuals based on merit.

Federal Appointments
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Simms Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—Windsor, NL

Mr. Speaker, at least I wrote my own question.

The Conservatives' message to Canadians is that if they want help from the government, they had better be a card-carrying Conservative.

How about awarding postings to four Conservative insiders last month, including two to the Toronto Port Authority board. Who did that? It was the Minister of Transport who did that.

Might the Minister of Transport explain why his colleague, the Minister of Natural Resources, is currently under investigation for organizing a Conservative fundraiser straight out of the Toronto Port Authority head office?

Federal Appointments
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Yellowhead
Alberta

Conservative

Rob Merrifield Minister of State (Transport)

Mr. Speaker, it was our government that actually brought in the changes. We brought in the arm's length powers under the Accountability Act to be able to have agencies investigate such matters.

It just so happens that the Minister of Natural Resources has told me that she has received correspondence from the Ethics Commissioner and that correspondence has cleared her of all allegations.

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Judy Sgro York West, ON

Mr. Speaker, a couple of days ago I met with Joe and Marlene. Joe had worked for Nortel for over 20 years. He contributed to his pension plan and now, because his company has gone bankrupt, that pension has been gutted and there is no help from the government.

Just a few short years ago, the current Prime Minister actually said that he wanted to kill the Canada pension plan. What would Joe and Marlene have done? How would they ever have been able to pay their heat, their utility bills and their grocery bills if we did not have the Canada pension plan?

Will the Prime Minister admit that he was wrong and that he has no intention of killing the Canada pension plan?

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont
Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member knows, the pension issue regarding Nortel is a provincial issue and should be dealt with by the provincial government in Ontario.

When the opposition asks this type of question, I am reminded by the quote from their party leader who said, “Nothing is personal in politics, because politics is theatre. It's part of the job to pretend to have emotions that you do not actually feel”.

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Judy Sgro York West, ON

Mr. Speaker, just as a reminder to the parliamentary secretary, the Canada pension plan is a federal responsibility and something that we are supposed to be looking after.

Seniors are under attack continually, whether we are talking about rising utility bills, the higher cost of living or low interest rates.

The last time the Prime Minister actually studied this issue, he was very much in support of killing the Canada pension plan and privatizing it. Where would seniors be today? Where would Joe and Marlene be today if they did not have the Canada pension plan to rely on?

We want to know if the plan is under attack and whether it will be protected in the future.

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Souris—Moose Mountain
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Ed Komarnicki Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and to the Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, we can safely say that the Canada pension plan is intact, the old age security is intact and the guaranteed income supplement program is intact.

We have done more for seniors in two years than the Liberal government did in 13 years. We have established a minister of state for seniors and a national council for seniors so we can listen to seniors and do things for them. We introduced pension income splitting, doubled the pension income tax credit and raised the GIS exemption from $500 to $3,500.

We have done a number of things for seniors that the Liberals failed and refused to do over 13 years.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Tim Uppal Edmonton—Sherwood Park, AB

Mr. Speaker, this government is committed to an environmental strategy that Canadians can trust and believe in.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources please tell this House and all Canadians how this government is investing in green technology and promoting leading-edge research in carbon capture and storage?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for Edmonton—Sherwood Park for his incredibly hard work and his successful work on this file.

We have another good news story out of our economic action plan. As everyone knows, our government is committed to investing in green technology and yesterday we announced a $120 million investment in carbon capture as part of our clean energy fund. This announcement is a joint venture with government and industry. It will develop a fully integrated carbon capture and storage project. This project will see the capture, transport and storage of over one million tonnes of CO2 per year.

Nortel
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, today we learned that executives at Nortel have filed a staggering $25 million in claims for pension bonuses and severance payments.

Those who drove the company into the ground are pursuing massive payouts while rank and file Nortel workers are in danger of losing their own pensions. In Quebec, Nortel pensioners are being protected by the Quebec pension plan but that is not so in the rest of the country.

When will the government finally protect Nortel workers who have been left out in the cold?

Nortel
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont
Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, as I just mentioned, and the hon. member knows this, the Nortel pension issue is a matter for the Ontario government to work on.

Nortel
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, do you not love it? In Britain and in the U.S., they are protected but not so in Canada.

We also know that the federal government is buying the Carling campus of Nortel. Some of that money could be used to help Nortel employees who have been struggling with the company's collapse. Nortel employees are taking a backseat to large creditors and are being forced to watch as the remains of the company are divided up while the government is watching.

Will the money going to Nortel for the purchase of the Carling campus find its way into the hands of Nortel workers or to the executives who destroyed the company?

Nortel
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont
Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, once again, our thoughts are always with workers who lose their jobs and workers whose pensions are affected.

However, I would remind the hon. member that this is not a time for political gamesmanship. The fact is that the jurisdictional responsibility for Nortel pensioners in Canada lies with the Ontario government. The situation is different from what it is in other countries.

Biotechnology
Oral Questions

October 9th, 2009 / 11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Nicole Demers Laval, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Government of Quebec unveiled its new biopharmaceutical strategy. It includes an initiative along the lines of the Bloc Québécois' economic recovery plan, which proposes to allow businesses to claim on a quarterly basis tax credits for research and development.

What is the government waiting for to act on this proposal from the Bloc Québécois that would ensure that all businesses can have access to cash and reinvest it immediately in their development activities?