House of Commons Hansard #15 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was goods.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please. I know it is Friday but we need to hear the hon. member. The hon. parliamentary secretary to the Minister of the Environment.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, the fact is, now we have turned the corner and those dark years are over. We have the toughest targets in Canadian history: 20% absolute reductions by 2020.

However, the question still rings within this Parliament, the question from the leader of the Liberal Party, which is why did they not get it done.

Culture
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Richard Nadeau Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, the $25 million earmarked in the budget for the Canada prizes for the arts merely serves to satisfy friends of the minister who, without consulting anyone, tried to suggest that they had a project of which the artistic community unanimously approved. However, we now know that this project is neither desired by nor desirable for the cultural community.

Will the minister do the only sensible, intelligent thing given the number of objections and abandon this project once and for all?

Culture
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, Canada's economic action plan, budget 2009, established record funding for the arts. One of the things we really wanted to do was to create an award that would recognize excellence in the arts, like the awards we created for health and sciences.

This will be an outstanding celebration of arts and culture right here in Canada. It will be a tremendous legacy coming out of this particular economic action plan.

Culture
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Richard Nadeau Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, this government does not respect the cultural community. What is needed are real programs that meet artists' needs and can help them promote our culture abroad. That is what all stakeholders in the cultural community are asking for.

The question is simple: will he finally listen to reason and create real programs to promote our culture abroad?

Culture
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, I am not quite sure who the Bloc member is listening to but I do know that the Bloc voted against $530 million worth of investment into arts and culture through the economic action plan.

I will read what The Globe and Mail had to say about the new awards. It stated:

It's a visionary notion.

To seed such an enterprise in the midst of a worldwide recession is so bold as to be virtually unheard-of.

This is about giving a jolt of entrepreneurial energy to the arts, about putting young artists in a borderless world on centre stage, and with them, Canada, as a country that is open to world culture, and cares about the arts and artists.

Artists should be thrilled. This is their moment.

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Luc Malo Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, even though the U.S. Senate toned down the Buy American Act to bring it into line with the trade agreements that are in place, this is not enough. It will still be possible to exclude steel from Quebec and Canada from nearly all the infrastructure projects supported by the Obama administration.

Will the government take advantage of President Obama's visit to Canada next week to obtain the assurance that the steel industry in Quebec and Canada will not be hit with any prohibitions?

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, we have been in very close contact with our American colleagues over the buy American act. We are very satisfied with the changes that have been made to it. We will continue to monitor this very closely to ensure we end up with an act that does not discriminate against Canada.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

February 13th, 2009 / 11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Jean Dorion Longueuil—Pierre-Boucher, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions took effect on March 18, 2007. Pressed by Quebec, Canada signed this convention, along with 95 other countries.

Since the United States still has not signed the convention, will the Prime Minister put this item on the agenda for his meeting with President Obama, in order to convince him to sign this convention?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I am always interested in the questions the Bloc asks about language, culture and the promotion and expression of Canadian culture. I would like to remind my hon. colleague, however, that it was this government that gave Quebec a seat at UNESCO.

Arts and Culture
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Lise Zarac LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, when asked yesterday about the Canada Prizes for the Arts and Creativity, the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages said, “in this budget we will create prizes for Canadian artists”.

That is quite a flip-flop. We had understood that these prizes were meant for foreign artists. Just to be perfectly clear, are the Conservatives saying that the Canada Prizes for the Arts and Creativity will be awarded to Canadian artists?

Arts and Culture
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, what we seek to do is create an international competition that awards excellence. It will create a centre of excellence right here in Canada. The world will be watching and we will be promoting artists from right here in Canada on the brightest stage in the world, created by this measure that is spun out of this economic action plan. It is a great victory for arts and culture in Canada. We are very proud of it.

Arts and Culture
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Lise Zarac LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian prizes for the arts were created on page 175 of the budget, which reads:

The Canada Prizes for the Arts...will bring the world’s best new artists...to Canada....

Nowhere is it mentioned that these prizes will be awarded to Canadian artists. Did the minister change his mind? Will those prizes reward Canadian artists or foreign artists, or has the minister misled the House?

Arts and Culture
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, I will speak a little slower. The awards will recognize excellence in the arts. It will be a very bright stage on which Canadian artists will have the opportunity to compete against the best in the world. We will create a centre of excellence right here in Canada.

It is a huge victory for arts and culture in Canada, a celebration of arts and culture in a borderless world where our artists want the opportunity to compete and to share their talent with the rest of the world. This is a great story.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Mark Holland Ajax—Pickering, ON

Mr. Speaker, in June 2008, the public safety committee called for tighter restrictions on the use of tasers. For eight months, the government and the commissioner ignored the recommendations saying that “tasers are here to stay”.

Yesterday, we saw an about face. Suddenly, not only is there a new policy, but we were told that it was there all along and that they had just kept it a secret. This came as a shock, not just to the public but to RCMP officers themselves. Last night, they denied any changes were made.

How could the minister allow such confusion and mismanage a matter this critical to public safety?