House of Commons Hansard #15 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was goods.

Topics

Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

Liberal

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, it deals with the movement of dangerous goods, and I was talking about threats to our transportation arteries. One of the threats that has been brought up by members of the government is the issue relating to terrorism. Part of that is rooted in the lack of resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Why is the government not pursuing a UN stabilization force in the West Bank and Gaza that would terminate the attacks against Israel? Why is it not pursuing an effort to stop the settlements that are continuing to take place on Palestinian territory? Why does it not--

Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

Conservative

Kevin Sorenson Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, on a point of order, unfortunately the member is just continuing his rant against Israel. We are dealing with Bill C-9, which is a transportation act here in Canada.

I would again ask the Chair to again ask the member to bring his speech back to something relevant to the topic of debate today.

Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

I appreciate the remarks by the hon. member. The hon. member for Esquimalt--Juan de Fuca has a short period of time. Perhaps we could move on to questions and comments, or he could just wrap up with some comments relevant to the bill.

Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

Liberal

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, I assume that time has not been taken from my time.

In closing, this issue is very important in terms of security. They have to pursue a two-stage solution that both Israelis and Palestinians want. They want to make sure that they open borders. The people of Palestine want to be able to have an economy. As I said, the UN stabilization--

Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

We will move on to questions and comments.

The hon. member for Western Arctic.

Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, I am not going to speak to the relevancy of the hon. member's remarks in his speech, because in a way I can see where he is going with it: the burden to be put on Canadians in terms of their rights and freedoms depends upon the problems in the world that are going to create the situation for terrorism.

He is correct in that the debate is around our setting up a law to put burdens on Canadians to prove their ability not to be involved in terrorism and not to be a security risk to the general population. The security risk is measured against the security situation in the whole world. I see his point.

I would like to have a debate about the bill as well. That is important here too, because we are talking about the rights of Canadians. If the hon. member has made his point about the world situation, perhaps he could give me an idea of what he feels this bill does to an ordinary Canadian, to a trucker who is trying to make a living in this country and now has to face this security clearance that might actually prevent him from doing his work.

Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992
Government Orders

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, our position as a party is to move this bill forward to committee, where we can listen to groups such as truckers and others who can provide their concerns and their solutions to any problems with respect to this bill.

In my comments, I hope I have made clear the challenges we have in our country with respect to providing the personnel and the infrastructure to respond when we have dangerous goods spills, the challenges in identifying what those are and the challenges in identifying what our first responders and second responders need in order to be able to deal with those challenges when they arise.

In my comments I was relating to the international scene for the very reasons that my hon. colleague mentioned. We cannot divorce ourselves from that. It is a concern for all of us. It is a concern of Canadians. It is a concern of the opposition, the government and our partners.

I was outlining some of the international challenges taking place in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Palestine and Israel, and some of the solutions we can proffer if the government is willing to act in an innovative way. If the government is willing to be a leader, not a follower, it could actually make a difference in trying to reduce our threat level here at home and abroad.

Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992
Government Orders

10:55 a.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, as the member for Western Arctic has asked, I would like to hear comments from my colleague, the member from British Columbia.

My border crossing at Windsor-Detroit is the busiest one in the country. We have had an ongoing problem with transport trucks getting across the border and being stopped on the U.S. side because the Americans are very concerned that we have not done enough to protect the transport of hazardous goods. This has mostly been from the security standpoint, but it is also from concerns over the potential degradation of the environment on their side of the border.

Does the hon. member have an overall analysis of this legislation as to whether it is going to be strong enough in the security and environmental areas to give our partners on the U.S. side some relief and some satisfaction?

Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992
Government Orders

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, obviously security is a two-way street when it comes to our borders. We have to work together with the Americans. I am hoping this issue will be on the Prime Minister's agenda so that we will have a border that enables us to move goods and services back and forth in a streamlined and efficient way while still ensuring that security is paramount.

The issue of shipping by sea receives short shrift. Sea lanes, sea shipping and containers that come into the country do not receive the checks they ought to receive. This is a very serious problem. Interestingly enough, the technology that would enable us to check the compartments does exist, so I believe that what we have are technological and human resource deficits. We do not need to develop and devise new technologies. They already exist.

I would ask the government to adopt and use the technologies that exist to check not only the products coming by land, but also those coming by air and sea.

Anti-Semitism
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government condemns the latest anti-Semitic outburst at York University. This week, chants of “Zionism is racism” were heard, and one person was called a “dirty Jew”.

Sadly, incidents like these have become far too prevalent on college and university campuses across Canada. I am reminded of the violent left-wing mob that shouted anti-Semitic curses at a former Israeli prime minister and prevented him from speaking at Concordia University in 2002.

I fear there is a rise among the extreme left of a new anti-Semitism. We see it in the instances that I mentioned. It lies below the surface of the public discourse waiting, waiting for us to let our guard down, waiting for the outrage to subside, waiting for the right time to flourish. We must confront it, fight it, and defeat it.

Mount Pearl Sports Alliance
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Siobhan Coady St. John's South—Mount Pearl, NL

Mr. Speaker, it is with pride that I rise today to recognize the outstanding work of the Mount Pearl Sports Alliance. The Mount Pearl Sports Alliance is a model of community sports development. It is a partnership of sports organizations that work together in consultation and coordination, maximizing resources and improving sporting opportunities in the vibrant community of Mount Pearl, Newfoundland and Labrador.

Recently the Mount Pearl Sports Alliance honoured those with the highest achievement in sport. The criteria for selection involved not only individuals and teams that excel, but also recognized service to organizations. I would like to recognize: Adam Keating, Kelly Whitelaw, Pearlgate Girls Bantam Bowling Team, Janet Maher, Eddie Hynes, Darren Reid, Stephanie Dyer and Chris Bishop.

I want to congratulate the award winners and the Mount Pearl Sports Alliance for their good work in promoting sports and active living.

Félix Leclerc Félins Provincial Basketball Tournament
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Bloc

Nicolas Dufour Repentigny, QC

Mr. Speaker, the 10th edition of the Félix Leclerc Félins provincial basketball tournament was held from February 6 to 8. Over 120 high school teams participated in the tournament, the largest of its kind in Quebec.

All told, some 1,700 athletes aged 12 to 17 played 202 basketball games. It was an excellent opportunity for them to show off their athletic prowess and share their passion for basketball.

The tournament was also an excellent opportunity for the city of Repentigny because it generated half a million dollars in profits.

On behalf of myself and my Bloc Québécois colleagues, I would like to congratulate all of the students who participated in the tournament. I would also like to congratulate Alain Doyon, who oversaw the tournament, all the members of the organizing committee, and the 350 volunteers for their participation.

Outremont Rail Yard
Statements By Members

February 13th, 2009 / 11 a.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Outremont rail yard is a site with tremendous development potential. One precondition is cleaning up the site, since it has serious environmental liabilities.

The former Liberal member of Parliament for Outremont had promised $25 million for that, but never kept his promise. The Conservative government is promising money for infrastructure, but that money is conditional and, above all, partisan.

Citizens groups are worried because their social objectives and quality of life could be compromised if harmonious, sustainable development is not ensured. The City of Montreal, the Université de Montréal and more importantly the public have been waiting for years and deserve to see some action.

The Conservative government must therefore recognize the historic role of the federal government in such a rail site and use some of the money earmarked for infrastructure to finally develop this exceptional site in a way that is socially acceptable.

The Budget
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Kevin Sorenson Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, Canadians re-elected our Conservative government to stand up for Canada during the current global economic turmoil.

Budget 2009 delivers an economic action plan that provides a multi-year approach to stimulate our economy and protect Canadian jobs. We are acting to provide targeted and temporary measures that will build on Canada's long-term strengths and help hard-working Canadian families through the short-term challenges. Our government is delivering access to financing, taking action to stimulate the housing market, building infrastructure to create jobs sooner rather than later, and providing extra support for communities and business.

In my riding we will be taking advantage of the recreational infrastructure program in Canada. This program helps communities build new facilities or upgrade existing ones. Arenas, swimming pools, basketball and tennis courts and soccer fields are examples of recreational facilities that could qualify for 50% funding from the government.

Let us keep building Canada.

The Economy
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Bramalea—Gore—Malton, ON

Mr. Speaker, plant closures and layoffs have been happening almost daily and Canadians are losing their jobs. A recent survey showed that half of all Canadians are worried about losing their jobs.

In my riding, Formulated Coatings Ltd. laid off 60 workers two weeks ago when it announced bankruptcy. Also, the Chrysler assembly plant just announced a second temporary shutdown in two weeks.

Every day more and more businesses are declaring bankruptcy. More than 129,000 jobs were lost in January alone. We are sure there are more to come. We have heard nothing from the Prime Minister, who seems to me missing in action during the worst recession in decades.

Why is the Prime Minister and the government silent on the issue when they should be providing Canadians with immediate action to put an end to Canadian job losses?