House of Commons Hansard #74 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was products.

Topics

Health
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, Canada is well-positioned to respond through pandemic preparedness. We prepared the plan back in 2006 and invested $1 billion. This plan includes delivery of services to first nations communities. We continue to work with the first nations communities, including the provincial health ministries. Supply is not a problem in any of the nursing stations in Manitoba's first nations communities.

Health
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Todd Russell Labrador, NL

Mr. Speaker, “We are in a war with no artillery”, said Chief Harper of the Garden Hill First Nation.

Yesterday, another mother lost her child to miscarriage. Residents continue to be airlifted out, with severe symptoms, but planes return empty. Pandemics hit first nations communities the hardest and the federal government has failed to respond. The worst may still be upon us, according to experts.

How many more have to get sick before the feds send in help to the Garden Hill First Nation and other first nations communities?

Health
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, again, we continue to work with the provinces and public health agencies, Indian and northern affairs and aboriginal communities to ensure a coordinated response to this.

Health Canada has provided additional nurses to the community and physicians are on-site. PHAC epidemiologists arrived in the community last week. Supply is not an issue in the communities. I come from a small community of aboriginal people. I know what the limitations are. At the same time we are continuing to work with the communities as we respond to this issue.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Christiane Gagnon Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister said, “The EI system is not perfect. We are looking at more improvements for the fall”. In the same breath, he said, “But don’t let anyone tell you that the EI system is not responding to the realities of the recession”. This progress report is yet another sham. His plan is clearly not responding to the crisis.

The Liberals are looking for excuses to support a smoke-and-mirrors progress report, but how can the Prime Minister dare ask unemployed workers to wait any longer? He needs to act now. What does he plan to do?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, we have done a lot for those unfortunate enough to lose their jobs. We have provided five extra weeks of benefits. We have broadened the work sharing program to protect jobs. We have done plenty of other very important things. Meanwhile, the Bloc has voted against our efforts to help the unemployed.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Christiane Gagnon Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, unemployed workers cannot wait any longer. The employment insurance system must be completely revamped, as the Bloc Québécois has suggested. We have to eliminate the waiting period, apply a 360-hour eligibility threshold to everyone, and increase the benefit rate from 55% to 60%.

The solutions are obvious. When will the government take action?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, we are keeping a close eye on the economy and on benefits for the unemployed. That is why the Prime Minister said yesterday that changes are in store to improve the system so that it meets the needs of unemployed workers. However, one thing we will not do is set up an employment insurance system that calls 45 days a year's worth of work.

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

June 12th, 2009 / 11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Claude DeBellefeuille Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, the rescue plan for the forestry industry has not even been announced, and it is already coming under fire. According to Yves Lachapelle, of the Quebec Forest Industry Council, the plan is too limited. It would deal only with the problem of black liquor, and just six paper mills out of 50 in Quebec would have access. A plan must address the majority of the companies.

Will the minister hear the message from the industry, which has been saying loud and clear for months that what the industry needs is financing?

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and to the Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, we are determined to support the efforts of the forestry industry across the country, including in Quebec. Our government is working very hard to ensure that the proposed solutions are effective and that they are implemented as quickly as possible.

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Claude DeBellefeuille Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, paper mills no longer have any cash, and their lines of credit are maxed out. What they need is very short-term financing.

Does the government plan on offering loan guarantees to all sectors of the forestry industry and not just to the export sector?

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and to the Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, our government is determined to help the forestry industry without jeopardizing the softwood lumber agreement with the United States and access to the American market. We are taking a cautious approach because we are listening to industry stakeholders, who are all telling us to be careful.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians expect their government to be upfront with them, especially in the midst of a recession that is hurting so many. Yesterday's performance by the Prime Minister and his own personal Phil Donahue had all the substance of a 30-second spot for ShamWows.

Will the Prime Minister just do what he owes Canadians and explain why the stimulus he promised to accelerate is not reaching the very people and communities who so desperately need it?

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the member comes from Hamilton. We have announced, with our partner the Government of Ontario, with my Premier Dalton McGuinty, more than 1,200 projects in every corner of the province, and we are going to see more than $3.5 billion worth of projects go forward. Engineers, architects, plants that make materials for construction, are already well at work. Shovels are going in the ground as we speak, and we are getting the job done.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, let me remind the minister what it says on his very own report card. On page 110 of the report card, the Conservatives claim to have accelerated the building Canada plan, yet according to the information that they themselves tabled in the House just a week ago, the Conservatives have allocated less than one-quarter of the building Canada plan and not a cent went to either Quebec or Ontario for base funding.

Their stimulus report was pure fiction. Why are the Conservatives saying one thing about their stimulus on an over-produced infomercial and another thing behind closed doors?

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, what we have seen with respect to building Canada is that more than half of the money has now been completely committed, projects are under way right across the province and right across the country. We have new infrastructure spending that is going on to stimulate the economy, to stimulate economic growth. More than 80% of the initiatives in the budget are now well under way. Step by step, we are getting the job done. This time requires strong leadership, cooperation in partnership, and not the criticism of the NDP, who did not even read the project and the proposals in the report that came out last week. That is a shame.