House of Commons Hansard #74 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was products.

Topics

Food Banks
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is the season of renewal, but during these turbulent economic times, not all families are able to share in this summer's bounty. That is why I am so proud to live in Hamilton, a community where we help each other thrive.

In that spirit, I want to encourage all those who can to make a donation of time, talent or treasure to two organizations that are making a profoundly positive difference in our community.

Neighbour to Neighbour is the Mountain's only food bank, and while many of us give generously on special occasions, hunger exists 365 days a year. Please help replenish the food bank's cupboards by making a donation to help our neighbours in need.

Or if people would rather get their hands dirty, why not volunteer at the Hamilton Community Gardens, a ministry of West Highland Baptist Church? One and a half acres of vegetable gardens have already been planted, but they need weeding, cultivating and harvesting. It is gentle exercise and a great way to assist the Hamilton food bank and soup kitchen community with supplies of fresh local produce.

Thanks for digging deep. It is what we do for each that makes me proud to call Hamilton my home.

Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, last spring, our government tabled an effective and unprecedented economic action plan and 80% of the measures are already on their way to being implemented. The Bloc Québécois has chosen sides. Its objective is clear: to destabilize Quebec. The end result is also clear. It wants to let Quebec hang out to dry. It prefers to vote against any positive action and do nothing at all for Quebec workers.

As for the Liberal leader, he voted for this action plan. Holding an election now will inevitably slow down its implementation and the Liberal leader knows it. He wants to increase taxes. We do not. Canada needs a strong Parliament that works for and not against the economic and social future of Canada and Quebec.

Today, the Liberal leader must decide if he will be remembered for choosing the greater good of Canada or his own partisan interests. Will he rise to the occasion or turn his back on Canada? He should—

Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Beauharnois—Salaberry.

Aerospace Industry
Statements By Members

June 12th, 2009 / 11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Claude DeBellefeuille Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives are using the aerospace industry to play petty politics, wrongly accusing the Bloc Québécois of being to blame for the fact that three ministers will be away next week at one of the world's largest aerospace shows, the Paris Air Show at Le Bourget. Ordinarily, ministers are accompanied by only one opposition member when they travel. Against the backdrop of a minority government, the Conservative whip's unrealistic demand that every minister be accompanied by two opposition MPs threatened this mission from the start.

Yesterday morning, the Bloc Québécois confirmed to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services that the member for Chicoutimi—Le Fjord would accompany him to Paris, even though a number of important votes, including a confidence vote, are due to be held next week. However, the minister declined the offer, claiming that his schedule had been changed and that it was too late. The minister's flat-out refusal is a clear sign that he has little interest in attending this show and consequently little interest in the aerospace industry, which is based mainly in Quebec.

Peggy's Cove Lighthouse
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, I have a quiz for the House today. Where is the most famous and iconic lighthouse in all of Canada?

Peggy's Cove Lighthouse
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Some hon. members

Peggy's Cove.

Peggy's Cove Lighthouse
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

It is at Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia.

I did not hear anything from that side of the House, not because Conservatives do not know but because they are embarrassed that they cannot find $25,000 to paint that international landmark.

Being a good Nova Scotian, I will offer them a few ideas. I will offer them a few suggestions. How about this? They can fire the Republican spin doctors they hired for one month's work. That is $25,000 right there.

They can fire the psychic “style” consultant the Prime Minister has. The way they missed on the budget projections, they are not listening to her anyway.

They can shrink the size of cabinet. If they shrink the size of cabinet, they could paint the Peggy's Cove lighthouse 156 times.

They can slash the $1 billion that they have been using for consultants. They could paint 40,000 tourist landmarks with that one move alone.

The lighthouse is on over there, but nobody is home.

It is time to come out of the fog and paint the lighthouse at Peggy's Cove.

The Economy
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

James Bezan Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government is getting things done for Canadians and their families. Because of the unprecedented steps we took in our economic action plan, families and businesses in every region of Canada are now paying less taxes. Unemployed workers are now receiving more help and major job-creating projects are already breaking ground.

Our Conservative government has permanently reduced the tax burden on Canadians. We are assisting the unemployed through extended EI benefits and improving skills training. We are supporting home ownership and creating jobs through housing construction. We are investing in the jobs of tomorrow through new supports for research and technology. The actions we have taken are what Canadians have asked for.

In response to our strong leadership, the leader of the Liberal Party said, “We will have to raise taxes”. This Liberal tax hike policy and the job-killing carbon tax are not what Canadians need.

That is why Canadians continue to trust our Conservative government with managing the economy.

Medical Isotopes
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, so far, we have heard nothing but disinformation, misleading numbers and propaganda in the isotope crisis.

The minister said that the MAPLE reactors have never produced isotopes. That is not true, according to the experts. She dug up studies from 2003, but forgot to tell us that the MAPLE reactors' licences were renewed in 2007.

Why is the government putting its ideological privatization agenda ahead of the facts and Canadians' health care needs?

Medical Isotopes
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I quote Hugh MacDiarmid, the CEO of AECL:

--even if we were to take the decision tomorrow morning for whatever set of reasons to try to return the MAPLEs to service, it would be many years and many hundreds of millions of dollars before those reactors would be licenseable and able to be put into service. It's just not a realistic option at this time.

Medical Isotopes
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, we also get misinformation about isotope supply.

Dr. Robert Atcher, president of the American Society of Nuclear Medicine, has stated that the excess capacity that the world's remaining four reactors have “is not capable of making up for the shortage that having the Chalk River reactor off-line has created”. Is Dr. Atcher wrong?

Would the minister tell us exactly how many of the 5,000 Canadian patients scheduled daily to receive cancer, heart and bone tests over the next week will get them?

Medical Isotopes
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for his question. There are two parts to it. One is the short-term reaction to the problem before us.

Right now, Canada is leading in the world to find an international response to this global problem. In fact, the Petten reactor in The Netherlands has ramped up production by 50% and South Africa by 30%. Australia is moving fast to bring the OPAL reactor on line and some believe that this will happen within the next few weeks. That is the short-term solution.

In the long-term, we have a panel of experts who are working to address the problem of medical isotope production.

Medical Isotopes
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government is misleading Canadians about the effectiveness of alternatives and their supply. There are no alternatives when it comes to getting bone scans for our kids. Deny it.

Thallium supplies are not meeting demand. Deny it.

It has been confirmed we are in an international bidding war for scarce medical isotopes.

How does the minister respond to the U.S. national research council's description of the government's handling of this crisis as a “train wreck”, wreaking havoc all over the world?

Medical Isotopes
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the contingency measures that were established by the medical isotope experts are being implemented to manage the shortage that we are dealing with in Canada. Contingency measures are ensuring that the supplies of isotopes are targeted at patients most at risk, such as children.

Many tests can be completed using other options, such as thallium and sodium fluoride. While they are not long-term solutions, they provide doctors with more options to ensure patients who require testing receive it and to ensure those who are unable to use the alternatives, such as children, can receive TC99 isotopes.

Health
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Todd Russell Labrador, NL

Mr. Speaker, “A global pandemic, a local failure” reads today's headline in The Globe and Mail.

The H1N1 virus continues to spread in first nations communities in northern Manitoba. The federal government says it has a plan. It says it is working with the province. Yet, people are still getting sick; they are still waiting for help.

Why has the federal government not sent supplies and expertise to the Garden Hill First Nation and others to help them fight the spread of this virus?