House of Commons Hansard #74 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was products.

Topics

Middle East
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, our government firmly believes that the continued threat of terrorism and arms smuggling as well as Hamas' continued rocket attacks against Israel's citizens are major obstacles to a lasting peace in the Middle East. The government is leading international efforts to ensure action is taken to stop the flow of arms into the Gaza Strip.

This week, Canada hosted an expert level panel meeting on the Gaza counter-arms smuggling initiative. Alongside like-minded allies, the government continues to show leadership on a clear commitment—

Middle East
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Winnipeg North.

Medical Isotopes
Oral Questions

June 12th, 2009 / 11:45 a.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, isotope levels are getting so low that hospitals in Manitoba and in Ottawa are now saying that they are about to completely run out. Tens of thousands of patients across Canada face a long, dry summer without the scans they need. The government's isotope contingency plan is quickly becoming the new normal and doctors across Canada are sounding the alarm that if isotope supplies dip any lower, people will start to die.

Will the health minister guarantee that, at a minimum, critical care patients, no matter where they live, will have access to the isotopes they need in order to save their lives?

Medical Isotopes
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, my colleague, the Minister of Natural Resources, continues to work with the international community to ensure we have supplies in Canada.

The current shortage is a challenge. We have contingency measures to ensure that supplies of isotopes are targeted to patients most at risk, such as children. Supplies will vary throughout time, depending on what global reactors are available to supply these isotopes. We will continue to work with the provinces and territories to ensure that alternatives are available.

Health
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, there is still no real plan, no real answers for Canadians. The same is the case with the H1N1 wherein it has revealed there are serious cracks in the system.

Years of neglect of first nations communities has produced the ideal conditions for this pandemic to take root, cramped living conditions, poor water, lack of drinking water, and the government cannot even get hand sanitizers to all first nations communities. Worse, Health Canada is now talking about closing nursing stations in the north.

Will the minister guarantee that no nursing station in the north will be closed and that, in fact, the government will fix this public health disaster.

Health
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I want to be very clear to the House that we will not close nursing stations in Manitoba. The facts were misrepresented.

We continue to work with the provinces, public health agencies, Indian Affairs and Northern Development, aboriginal organizations and communities to ensure a coordinated response.

Minister of Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

France Bonsant Compton—Stanstead, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister's blunders in managing the isotope crisis are common knowledge. The minister left it up to the scientific and medical community to find solutions on its own, while she did nothing.

How can the minister explain this negligence and flagrant lack of leadership? She should have come up with a plan to deal with such a crisis, seeing as how the Chalk River reactor is now 52 years old and has been showing signs of failure for years.

Minister of Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, there are two tracks to the response to this global problem. One is to work with our international partners to increase the supply of medical isotopes and also to find alternatives in the meantime. The other is to appoint an expert panel that will work together on a long-term strategy for the production of medical isotopes in the future.

Minister of Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

France Bonsant Compton—Stanstead, QC

Mr. Speaker, faced with the fiasco in the management of the isotope crisis, the Prime Minister must see that his minister lacks the credibility to deal with this issue.

What is he waiting for to fire her and replace her with someone who can restore the hope and confidence of the scientific community and the many patients waiting for diagnosis and treatment?

Minister of Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, my department has taken action by working with the isotopes experts to develop guidance on dealing with the shortage. We are also using a special access program in the clinical trials to provide alternatives to Canadians.

Many tests can be completed using other options, such as thallium and sodium fluoride. While these are not long-term solutions, they provide doctors with more options to ensure that patients who require testing and who cannot use the alternatives, such as children, can receive TC99.

CBC/Radio-Canada
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are worried about the dismantling of an institution like CBC/Radio-Canada for ideological reasons. Because of the government's inaction, CBC/Radio-Canada must cut 800 jobs across the country and sell $125 million worth of assets. To oppose what the Prime Minister is doing, employees of Radio-Canada have launched a campaign entitled “I am, we are in favour of quality public broadcasting”. A number of federal and provincial members have supported this initiative.

Will the Prime Minister support this important campaign to save Radio-Canada?

CBC/Radio-Canada
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, our support for the CBC remains unwavering. We made a commitment in the last election that we would maintain or increase funding for the CBC. We have kept that commitment because we keep our election commitments.

The Liberal Party does not keep its election commitments, like in 1993 and 1997. In both cases that party promised to increase funding to the CBC and actually cut it and 4,000 jobs were lost.

We keep our election commitments. When it comes to the CBC, the Liberals cannot be trusted at all.

CBC/Radio-Canada
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, when the Conservatives say that they are funding CBC/Radio-Canada appropriately, they know that that is completely false. Public funding for CBC/Radio-Canada in constant dollars is declining, and the corporation's budget is eroded every year. As a result, a major player in developing French- and English-language television, radio and new media is fading away.

Can the Prime Minister put aside his ideology? He should give that a try and promise to provide stable, adequate funding for our public broadcaster. Can he do that?

CBC/Radio-Canada
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, that is consistent with what we always hear from the Liberal Party: spend, spend, spend. The Liberals say that they will raise taxes and bring in an increase to the GST. They are going to get it all from Canadians because they are going to keep on spending.

Our government has put stable funding behind the CBC, more funding than the Liberal Party ever provided. Tax Freedom Day came 19 days earlier this year thanks to our Conservative government. We will not follow a Liberal example.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday Mr. Abdelrazik's daughter, Wafa, celebrated another birthday without her father around.

Today, Mr. Abdelrazik had a flight booked to return home, pursuant to a request for him to appear before the foreign affairs committee. In fact, the minister received the letter, signed by the Conservative chair of the committee, asking the minister to issue him a passport so he could appear before the committee, which is exactly what the Federal Court is requesting. Sadly, the minister did not even bother responding to the committee's letter.

Will Mr. Abdelrazik be at the foreign affairs committee on Monday?