House of Commons Hansard #69 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was custody.

Topics

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as a matter of fact our government is working 10 times faster than any other in the modern era. In just the last couple of months, we have doubled the gas tax from $1 billion to $2 billion, accelerated the first payment from July to April, cut red tape and simplified the application process.

We are continuing to work constructively with our partners, and just this morning Canada's transport minister was joined by his provincial counterpart to announce that the City of Ottawa will receive more than $250 million in joint funding for over 90 projects. By working with the provinces, we are getting the job done. That is what Canadians expect.

Shipping Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Laurentian Pilotage Authority is vital to maintaining the environmental safety of commercial navigation in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence ecosystem.

The current chairman, Michel Beauregard, has done an exemplary job. He wiped out a $10.2 million deficit and created a surplus. Shipping delays have been reduced, service improved and cooperation among stakeholders--shipowners, pilots and agents--has never been better, so why will the government not be reappointing Mr. Beauregard?

Is this how Conservatives reward merit and reinforce accountability?

Shipping Industry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Fort McMurray—Athabasca
Alberta

Conservative

Brian Jean Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I am more than happy to get back to the member in relation to specifics on that issue, but let us be clear. This is an issue that the government will deal with, and it will deal with it in the best interests of Canadians.

Minister of Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Luc Malo Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Natural Resources herself admitted the seriousness of the situation concerning the secret documents left at a television station, so much so that she even offered to resign. She did force her assistant to resign and is letting her take the blame for the entire incident.

How is it that the Prime Minister does not consider this incident serious enough to accept her resignation? Is this not a clear demonstration of this government's incompetence and inconsistency?

Minister of Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I do not know where the hon. member has been for the last couple of days, but the government has treated this as a very serious matter. That is why appropriate corrective action has been taken.

In case he missed it, I will repeat it again. The person responsible for handling these documents offered her resignation, and it was accepted.

Rail Transportation
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, B.C. has been hit hard by this economic recession and the Conservatives claim to understand how important it is to stimulate and support the local economy and tourism. Why then, in this economic downturn, is the federal government derailing a $30 million opportunity for a second Amtrak run from Seattle to Vancouver by charging unprecedented inspection fees?

Will the minister support the local economy and expanded rail service to Vancouver, and immediately withdraw the demand for CBSA inspection fees?

Rail Transportation
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Fort McMurray—Athabasca
Alberta

Conservative

Brian Jean Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I can assure the member that this Conservative government is doing everything in its powers to get infrastructure money flowing quickly and to get it where it counts. In fact $29 billion will be pumped into the Canadian economy this very year to keep the economy going. It is an incredible move, and we are getting it done 10 times faster than any Liberal government ever did.

I would also like to point out that tax freedom day is actually 19 days earlier for those Canadians who are paying taxes. It is great news for Canadians all the way around.

D-Day
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Patricia Davidson Sarnia—Lambton, ON

Mr. Speaker, this weekend will mark 65 years since D-Day, a pivotal moment in the course of the Second World War.

Thousands of Canadians served our country bravely on the shores of Normandy. Many paid the ultimate sacrifice in the pursuit of freedom.

Could the parliamentary secretary please tell the House what the government is doing to mark this historic military anniversary and to honour those who served there?

D-Day
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the veterans of D-Day and the Battle of Normandy will tell us that they were ordinary Canadians serving their country because it was the right thing to do, but we know very well that those Canadians, like Lieutenant Hall, accomplished extraordinary things.

D-Day was a pivotal moment in history for Canada and for the world. To express the gratitude of all Canadians toward those who served on D-Day and in the Battle of Normandy, the Right Hon. Prime Minister of Canada and the Hon. Minister of Veterans Affairs will join leaders from around the world on the beaches of Normandy tomorrow to remember and pay respect to the lives lost there 65 years ago.

We must never forget the sacrifices of those who served our country and those who serve today, lest we forget.

Public Transit
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Federation of Canadian Municipalities recently underscored the importance of having a national strategy and strong partnership between the various levels of government in order to develop the best possible public transit network.

The Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities prefers to micromanage and is unilaterally imposing his views on the level of flexibility to be enjoyed by certain public transit systems in border cities, like Ottawa, Gatineau and Windsor.

Why does the minister refuse to listen to the public transit experts in question?

Public Transit
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Fort McMurray—Athabasca
Alberta

Conservative

Brian Jean Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, apparently the member was not listening. I just mentioned that we were pumping $29 billion into the economy this year in relation to transportation issues, exactly like the member has suggested. In fact, right now the Standing Committee for Transport, Infrastructure and Communities is studying high-speed rail and light rail in cities. We are trying to get to the bottom of what the Liberals left undone for many years.

We are not only funding projects, but we are working with the municipalities, provinces and territories to get the money out as quickly as possible.

We are getting the job done.

Transportation
Oral Questions

June 5th, 2009 / noon

Bloc

Mario Laframboise Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, the largest airport in the world, Seattle, has a control tower. Toulouse, the second largest according to the aeronautical industry, of course has a control tower. But the third largest, Mirabel international airport, no longer has one.

How can the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities explain that a week has gone by and he has done nothing about this? Will he put pressure on NAV CANADA this very afternoon so that Mirabel international airport again has a control tower?

Transportation
Oral Questions

Noon

Fort McMurray—Athabasca
Alberta

Conservative

Brian Jean Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the safety and security of air travel in Canada is the number one priority of this government. In fact, Canada's transport minister is aware of the situation at the Mirabel Airport and has directed department officials to look into the situation more carefully. However, if a user group has concerns over changes in service, we are happy to meet with it and further review the service.

Let us be clear. The safety of Canadians is our number one priority and we will not compromise that.

Telecommunications
Oral Questions

Noon

NDP

Jim Maloway Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, MTS Allstream is an important and essential asset to the Manitoba economy. Right now, it is appealing a decision by the CRTC that unfairly limits its ability to compete via-à-vis Ethernet services in areas currently dominated by the large national networks.

My question is for the Minister of Industry. What is the government doing to ensure that MTS Allstream and other similar enterprises are treated fairly by the CRTC and not pushed aside in favour of giants like Bell and Telus?

Telecommunications
Oral Questions

Noon

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, it is my joy and pleasure to rise in the House to answer the question.

The hon. member would be the first to complain if we interfered in the decision-making process of the CRTC, so we will not do that. However, on a broader perspective, I want to assure the hon. member and this chamber that I am heavily engaged in the whole strategy of the new digital economy.

The fact is if we are to move ahead as a nation, we need to be the best place in the world, where we can use the digital side of our economy to our advantage as Canadians. That includes the processes by which one deals with Ethernet and other issues.