House of Commons Hansard #80 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister himself signed the so-called bill of rights that says veterans have a right to be treated with respect, dignity, fairness and courtesy and that their privacy will be protected under the Privacy Act. Sean Bruyea did not get this. Hundreds of veterans across the country are now filing freedom of information requests because they suspect their information was scattered throughout the department like confetti.

That signature means absolutely nothing. What the government needs to do is apologize to Sean and the veterans of Canada and call a public inquiry.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

West Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Greg Kerr Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the volume from the member for inconsistency across the way is not going to change the outcome.

The reality is, yes, the Prime Minister has said that this issue must be dealt with fully and that the veterans must be protected. That is our commitment. I can only hope the member for Sackville—Eastern Shore has the courage and audacity to support the government when we clear this issue up.

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Luc Desnoyers Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister maintains that those who dare question his government's strategy for procuring the F-35s are putting jobs on the line. However, it is the Prime Minister himself who is jeopardizing jobs in Quebec's aerospace sector by refusing to demand spinoffs for the industry.

Will the Prime Minister acknowledge that the best way to keep jobs in the aerospace sector is to require economic spinoffs from Lockheed Martin?

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel Minister of State (Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec)

Mr. Speaker, as my colleague said earlier, a competitive process took place between 1997 and 2001 under the previous government. Since then, the project has moved forward with nine partner countries. I will read a quote from Claude Lajeunesse, a Quebecker and president of the Aerospace Industries Association of Canada: “We are calling on political leaders from all parties to support the government's decision. We do not want to repeat the mistakes of the past, because they will surely be more costly than ever before for our industry, for our military, and ultimately, for the nation” and for Quebec's aerospace sector.

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Luc Desnoyers Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, if the Prime Minister had been firm during the procurement of the F-35s by demanding our fair share of the economic spinoffs, we would have obtained $9 billion in contracts.

The government can make promises of possible spinoffs to the tune of $12 billion, but the reality is that it has obtained no guarantees, and we may end up losing out on major spinoffs.

Why is the government refusing to defend Quebec's aerospace industry?

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel Minister of State (Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec)

Mr. Speaker, Quebec's entire aerospace industry supports our government on this. Let us stop playing politics on this issue, even though it may be hard to resist.

I will read the quote from Pratt & Whitney president John Saabas that my colleague was referring to earlier: “The Canadian industry is ready to step up, but a decision needs to be made now. If we miss the boat, two years from now we will have a hard time making up lost ground...and recovering lost jobs.” Some people may not understand this, but people in the aerospace industry do.

Poverty
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Mario Silva Davenport, ON

Mr. Speaker, Thanksgiving is just days away and it is important to remember that many Canadian families will not enjoy even a basic Thanksgiving meal. Food bank use is up 21%. Many more Canadians are falling below the poverty line and current programs only maintain the status quo.

The best way to help our economy is to lift people out of poverty. Why is it so difficult for the Conservative government to put the needs of millions of Canadians who need help first?

Poverty
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Souris—Moose Mountain
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Ed Komarnicki Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and to the Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, we are indeed very interested in helping those who are in need. We have taken a number of initiatives in that regard. We have passed a number of tax measures to ensure there is more money in people's pockets to help them through difficult times. In fact, by reducing taxes, the average Canadian family will have an additional $3,000 in its pocket that it would not have had under the tax and spend policies of the Liberal Party.

Poverty
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Mario Silva Davenport, ON

Mr. Speaker, why is the government willing to spend millions of dollars on American-style megaprisons and give huge tax breaks to corporations instead of addressing the issue of poverty? Why has the government not listened to the 74 recommendations made by the Senate subcommittee on ending poverty and homelessness?

Poverty is an issue that will not simply go away for millions of Canadians unless something is done to help ease the burden. Why does the government insist on ignoring this problem?

Poverty
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Souris—Moose Mountain
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Ed Komarnicki Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and to the Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, we obviously sympathize with anyone who does not have a job, but the best way to get people out of poverty is to provide jobs for them. We have provided a number of initiatives under our economic action plan. We have created 430,000 jobs. Additionally, by work sharing, we have preserved over 255,000 jobs.

The leader of the member's party, the Liberal Party, would rather impose taxes, increase the GST and put taxes on business, which would cause a loss of over 300,000 jobs. That is the difference between us and them.

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, each new day brings new revelations about the former public works minister.

The minister should know that attending an event organized by an entrepreneur who just won a $9 million government contract was not a good idea. But he went anyway. He and Mr. Sauvé discussed the contract for 10 minutes. He even congratulated him.

Do there need to be more revelations before he resigns? Why is the minister still in the cabinet?

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I think we have addressed this in previous questions. What I can say is that the minister has given great detail with respect to the issues involving the individual in question.

I can say that this government's first order of business was to pass the Federal Accountability Act, tough ethics reform, tough anti-corruption measures. We eliminated the role of big money in politics; we eliminated corporations, unions and $5,000 donations. Now we have a more open, transparent and ethical campaign finance system.

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, there is nothing new about monkey business at the Department of Public Works, but the former minister makes Roch LaSalle smell like a spring day: tampering with access to information requests, rigging government contracts, shady kickbacks to grateful contractors. It was his department, on his watch and he is responsible as the minister. The buck stops with him.

The member for Simcoe—Grey was politically executed for the flimsiest of innuendo. Why is the minister still in cabinet when he was caught red-handed?

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the fury and bluster of the member opposite, while entertaining, is not factual.

Let us be very clear. We brought in the Federal Accountability Act. It imposes tough obligations on a variety of people in government and outside government. If there are any issues that are of concern, people who break the rules should face the full force of the law because that is how it is in this country.

Canadian Forces
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Rick Norlock Northumberland—Quinte West, ON

Mr. Speaker, there is a disturbing video running on the Internet. It calls our Canadian military “canon fodder”. This video has outraged Canadian military families, particularly those who have lost sons and daughters. They have considered it an insult and disrespectful of the careers chosen by their children.

Would the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence tell us what he thinks of this video?