House of Commons Hansard #32 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was crime.

Topics

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

No, Mr. Speaker, the hon. member has got it completely wrong. The MPCC and officials will continue to work with that group to provide all relevant documents. There is a mandate put in place for the MPCC, and the hon. member should have confidence in that process.

Democratic Republic of the Congo
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Jean Dorion Longueuil—Pierre-Boucher, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Congolese president, Joseph Kabila, is pressing for the UN peacekeepers to begin withdrawing from his country in June. But according to Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Cormier and many NGOs, the Democratic Republic of the Congo is not ready for the peacekeepers to pull out.

Will the government respond favourably to all those who want this important mission to continue?

Democratic Republic of the Congo
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I answered a similar question from another colleague earlier this week. I said then that Canada was one of the nations to which the UN Secretariat was considering offering a command position.

At present, Canada has to consider its capacity. We are analyzing this request and will pass on the information as soon as we have completed our analysis.

Fisheries
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Gerry Byrne Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte, NL

Mr. Speaker, the gulf crab fishery is made up of both traditional and new entrants alike.

In recent years, former groundfish-dependent fleets were allowed entry into area 12, but when the minister announced the 63% reductions in quota this year, rather than cutting the newer entrants first, a policy known as last in, first out, all shared the cuts proportionately and all shared the remaining quota, regardless of when they entered the fishery.

Will the minister confirm that she will be consistent and apply this same decision to northern shrimp, should quota reductions occur in that fishery?

Fisheries
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, the member will know that these decisions are always difficult decisions, especially when a quota is cut. These decisions are reached after considerable consultation with industry and science.

That is what was done in this case. We are following the precautionary approach and we will continue to do so.

Fisheries
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Gerry Byrne Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte, NL

Mr. Speaker, integrity begs the minister to do exactly the same on northern shrimp, should quota reductions occur, as she did on gulf crab.

Now decisions have to be made because the fishery has not yet recovered from the turmoil of the global recession. The global economic crisis is still keeping lobster prices low and shrimp at rock bottom prices. Crab prices are suffering despite resource cutbacks.

Why will the government not respond with a significant, comprehensive and augmented economic assistance package for the fishing industry?

Let me point out that should they spout off about what they have done so far, they are saying nothing--

Fisheries
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans.

Fisheries
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, I know the minister will welcome the hon. member's advice.

At this point there is no plan to provide some financial assistance, but we do allow some flexibility in the rules governing how the fishery is implemented, and we will assist harvesters in that way.

The member will also know that the standing committee unanimously supported a motion to take a look at the crab issue in Atlantic Canada. Perhaps these issues will be raised there.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, Parkwood Hospital in London, Ontario plans to close 72 veteran care beds. The problem is that veterans hospitals are only mandated to care for World War II and Korean war vets.

Does the Minister of Veterans Affairs have the wisdom to change the mandate for Parkwood and other veterans hospitals so that Canadian Forces personnel and RCMP who have served in peacekeeping missions and combat deployment since the Korean war would be eligible to access the same benefits and services offered to earlier generations?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Veterans Affairs and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, I would like to clarify a few things. Of course our veterans are entitled to receive care in extended care beds. To that end, some hospitals reserve beds specifically for long-term care. However, since our veterans are dwindling in number because of their advanced age, some beds are no longer occupied. It is in these circumstances that we would talk to the hospital or organization about reducing the number of beds. Of course there is always room for our veterans, and other people can use the space when it is available.

Brewing Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

David Christopherson Hamilton Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the people of Hamilton are outraged by Labatt's-owned Lakeport Brewery's complete disregard for the future job prospects of the 150 people it threw on the street. Not only is it closing the brewery, it is deliberately preventing other beer companies from restarting production and rehiring the workers.

Why is the federal government missing in action? The Siemens and Lakeport closures mean 700 lost jobs and the government has not lifted a finger to help. What exactly is the Conservative government going to do to help save these Hamilton jobs?

Brewing Industry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, that is not true. As the hon. member knows, or ought to know, this matter was in fact referred to the appropriate body, which is the Competition Bureau. It reviewed the facts of the case and declined to intervene because there was no reason to intervene in this particular case. The laws of the land are being upheld, and that is a matter of fact.

I was in Hamilton just three weeks ago announcing a project that our department is helping to finance that will grow 200 new jobs for Hamiltonians.

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

April 23rd, 2010 / 11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Blaine Calkins Wetaskiwin, AB

Mr. Speaker, in an April 21 interview, Calgary Police Chief Rick Hanson echoed what our government has said all along, that the gun registry is just a placebo and that it has not really worked all that well. He also said that lawmakers should focus more on sentencing.

Would the Minister of Public Safety inform the House what this Conservative government has done to address Police Chief Hanson's concerns?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, through this government's Tackling Violent Crime Act, we ensured tougher mandatory jail time for serious gun crimes. We also eliminated the practice of awarding two for one and three for one credit for time served, ensuring that the punishment truly fits the crime. This is something the Liberals tried to block.

We will continue to introduce legislation to protect victims and law-abiding citizens of this country. We will scrap the wasteful long gun registry supported by the opposition coalition of deceit.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Mark Eyking Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, for 25 years the Nova Scotia Gambia Association has sent workers, nurses and volunteers to help teach health awareness and education programs to the folks in Gambia and Sierra Leone. To celebrate its 25th anniversary, it was hoping to bring over some of its Gambian volunteers to Halifax. Unfortunately, their requests for travel visas have been denied.

Why are these humanitarian workers not allowed to enter Canada to celebrate their success?