House of Commons Hansard #32 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was crime.

Topics

Sébastien's Law (Protecting the Public from Violent Young Offenders)
Government Orders

10:55 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, I can wrap things up after question period, but I will start now.

Before getting to the heart of the matter, I would like to say that I had the opportunity to listen to and read the speech given by my colleague from Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, and I would like to acknowledge his exceptional contribution to this debate.

He gave an excellent speech yesterday on the matter before us now, Bill C-4, and I am pleased to have access to his expertise in this area. I am also glad that, as he said earlier, a number of professionals are providing a new perspective on this bill. We will probably have a chance in committee to take a more in-depth look at the different aspects we must take into account before passing such an important bill.

Today I would like to share a few thoughts that I shared yesterday and the day before with teachers and young people in the riding of Vaudreuil-Soulanges. We have been participating in a forum for the past two days. We also worked as delegates to the Millennium Summit. Homelessness and extreme poverty are issues that affect thousands of young people in Quebec. We also looked at the impact of poverty on the lives of these young people.

Although poverty is not as serious here as it is in many other countries, there are some hardships in life that could be avoided if we took better care of our young people and gave them more support. Although we all come into the world the same way, not everyone grows up in the same living conditions. We must address the problems facing our young people, and only then will we see a marked improvement in our society. We must deal with problems where they begin.

We are debating an important issue here today, one that must not become fodder for shameless propaganda.

I asked to speak to this issue because I wanted to share with the House some of the experiences recounted by some young people whose lives have not been easy. These young people want us to support their efforts and to understand why they are in their current situation. Young people are willing to talk to us about how they wound up in trouble, if we simply give them the chance. These young people's lives have been difficult.

Throughout my life, I have worked with young people and with several community groups. As I have already mentioned in the House, these groups provide crucial support to the communities they serve. Their opinions must be taken into consideration. The people who work in these community organizations are on the front lines of intervention with young people.

Long before I was elected, I worked in close cooperation with community groups to try to ensure fair and equitable sanctions for young offenders. Our society needed to develop an intervention plan centred on rehabilitation and prevention.

Sébastien's Law (Protecting the Public from Violent Young Offenders)
Government Orders

11 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I am sorry to have to interrupt the hon. member, but she will have 17 minutes remaining after routine proceedings later today.

Children's Day
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Maurice Vellacott Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

Mr. Speaker today, April 23, and during the weekend, Canadians of Turkish origin will celebrate Children's Day, together with fellow Canadians.

On April 23, 1920, the founder of the Turkish Republic, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk convened the Turkish Grand National Assembly and dedicated this day to children. By doing so, Atatürk not only entrusted the future of his young nation to her children but also showed the importance he placed on the health and education of young people.

In 1979, UNESCO proclaimed the year as the International Year of the Child. Today, April 23 is celebrated with children from more than 60 countries around the world, including Turkey and Canada. This is now a 30-year tradition in Canada.

Tonight in Ottawa in commemoration of Children's Day, the Turkish community will be hosting a fundraising gala dinner, and the benefits will go to the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario and the SOS Children's Villages.

Let us congratulate the organizers and wish them every success in their activities.

Parkinson's Disease
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Martha Hall Findlay Willowdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, April is national Parkinson's Awareness Month and this week is Parkinson's Awareness Week.

Since Parkinson's Awareness Week first began in 1984, it has given us all the opportunity to learn more and help others learn more about this devastating neurological disease that affects some 100,000 Canadians.

This week highlights the importance of research into the causes and treatments of Parkinson's. At the forefront of advocating for this is Parkinson Society Canada, which this year is celebrating 45 years of supporting and serving Canadians and their families affected by this disease.

Parkinson Society Canada is urging all Canadians to take part in fundraising events being held in communities across the country this week, events that will raise money and awareness for the causes, symptoms, treatments and needs of people with Parkinson's and their loved ones.

We cannot give up our search for a cure.

Repentigny International Junior Tennis Open
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Bloc

Nicolas Dufour Repentigny, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Repentigny International Junior Tennis Open is a symbol of pride and excellence in the region and it is back again this year. We are celebrating the 25th anniversary of this tournament, the second oldest tournament in Canada after the Rogers Cup and one of the top 10 most prestigious junior tennis tournaments around.

Starting tomorrow straight through until the end of the tournament on September 4, a series of events will be organized for people to help mark the 25th anniversary of the International Tennis Open.

I invite everyone in Quebec to take part in the various activities the organizing committee has planned for the coming months. I also invite everyone to come and cheer on the best junior tennis players in the world, who will be competing from August 27 to September 4.

I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge the exceptional work of all the volunteers and the organizing committee, who make this tournament such a success year after year.

Veterans Affairs
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government's plan to close 72 beds reserved for veterans at Parkwood Hospital in London, Ontario, is both shortsighted and disgraceful.

While we know there are fewer second world war and Korean war veterans needing hospital care, there is a growing need for the same quality care for members of the Canadian Forces and RCMP veterans who served Canada in Afghanistan and as peacekeepers in Bosnia, Cyprus and, indeed, around the world.

The number of modern-day veterans requiring care is steadily increasing. So is the need for beds. It is soulless to ban veterans who have served in peacekeeping and other missions since the Korean war from the specialized care that the Department of Veterans Affairs is obliged to provide.

I call on the federal government to change the regulations that exclude modern-day veterans and ensure access to these Parkwood beds. These brave men and women served our country well and deserve the assistance and care they need. We owe them at least that much.

Firearms Registry
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Pierre Lemieux Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, farmers in my riding and all across Canada need to know that the Liberals do not understand them and do not represent them. Yesterday, in a rather shocking display of anti-democratic behaviour, the Liberals, with help from their NDP and Bloc partners, tried desperately to force upon the public safety committee only their list of witnesses who support the long gun registry.

Farmers, hunters and rural Canadians have been clear that they want the Liberal long gun registry scrapped, but what does the Liberal leader do? He publicly states that he will force his MPs to ensure the continuation of the long gun registry. With decisions like that, it is no wonder that only a handful of Liberal MPs represent rural ridings.

Now is the time to end the Liberal long gun registry. Now is the time to target criminals and not our farmers and hunters. First Liberal MPs are whipped to support the wasteful and ineffective long gun registry, and now their leader is trying to silence Canadians who disagree with him.

Let us work together to end the long gun registry.

World Malaria Day
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, April 25 is World Malaria Day, a time to remember that more than two million people a year, many of them children, die of this disease.

Tackling this scourge must involve strengthening developing countries' primary health care systems and the selective spraying of DDT. When the latter was done in South Africa, it showed a 90% reduction in malaria cases, with no effect on the environment.

This June, as host to the G8 and G20 summits, Canada must play a role in leading the world's richest countries to invest in the primary health care systems of developing countries. This will enable us to treat most of the world's major killers, pneumonia, gastroenteritis, tuberculosis, malaria, HIV-AIDS and malnutrition, and it will reduce maternal and childhood deaths.

Our government cannot and must not lose this opportunity to have the most profound impact on the lives of the world's poorest. Let us use April 25 as a time to double our efforts to tackle malaria and the world's major killers.

Clearwater River
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Brian Jean Fort McMurray—Athabasca, AB

Mr. Speaker, water is life. In my constituency of Fort McMurray—Athabasca, we are privileged to have one of Canada's designated heritage rivers.

The Clearwater River once was a busy highway that opened up the north and west of Canada. Fur traders and explorers portaged the many falls and rapids and enjoyed the gentle flow to the mighty Athabasca River.

Today the Clearwater River, from its source in Lloyd Lake in northern Saskatchewan to the junction with the Athabasca, is still pristine and beautiful. Clear, clean water, fast-flowing rapids and banks lined with spruce and birch trees and many animals make our river a canoeist's dream. I invite you, Mr. Speaker, and all Canadians to enjoy this with us. My constituents are absolutely delighted that, because of the heritage river designation, the beauty, untouched nature and clean, pure water will be preserved for our future.

While we need to prosper economically, we need to preserve the waters we have. Let us continue to protect life by protecting our waters.

Cérium Prize
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, on April 15, at its annual gala, the Centre d'études et de recherches internationales of the Université de Montréal awarded the Cérium prize to Paul Gérin-Lajoie. This prize honours a Quebecker who has made an outstanding, lifelong contribution to the internationalization of Quebec.

Paul Gérin-Lajoie originated the doctrine of the same name that has formed the basis for Quebec's international policy since 1965. The doctrine states that a province's sovereignty in its areas of jurisdiction should also apply in its international relations. Elected officials and representatives of Quebec have since adopted this doctrine.

Paul Gérin-Lajoie also set up a foundation that contributes to basic child education and adult literacy in some of the world's poorest countries. One of the best-known activities of this foundation is the PGL dictation contest.

As the critic for la Francophonie, I congratulate Paul Gérin-Lajoie for the immense contribution he has made to extending Quebec's influence abroad.

Victims of Crime
Statements By Members

April 23rd, 2010 / 11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Daniel Petit Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the fifth National Victims of Crime Awareness Week will come to a close tomorrow, but it will not end there for us. Every victim of crime is important, no matter who they are or where they live. Protecting law-abiding Quebeckers and Canadians has always been a top priority for our Conservative government.

This week, our government put in place a number of initiatives to put the rights of law-abiding citizens before those of criminals.

Although the Leader of the Bloc stated earlier this week that “the Bloc...has done a lot by adopting a constructive and rigorous attitude when it comes to justice”, in this House, we know very well that it is not unusual for the Bloc to oppose our crime and justice initiatives.

Quebeckers and Canadians can always count on our government to ensure that victims' rights take precedence over those of criminals.

Guru Gobind Singh Children's Foundation
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Navdeep Bains Mississauga—Brampton South, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to the good work of the Guru Gobind Singh Children's Foundation.

The foundation was established by young people of the Canadian Sikh community in 1999 as a way to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the Khalsa and to honour the 10th guru of the Sikh faith. The foundation is driven by the motto “children helping children", and its good work supports children both in Canada and abroad.

The GGSCF actively involves youth and challenges them to understand the true meaning of charity. As an example, last year 90 of these young people ran across Canada from July 1 to August 30, starting from St. John's, Newfoundland and ending in Vancouver, British Columbia. The run raised money for children's hospitals in each province as well as a health centre in Liberia.

The Guru Gobind Singh Children's Foundation is a testament to what can happen when we teach our children to care about the world around them. I applaud the good work they do on behalf of the Canadian Sikh community and indeed all Canadians.

Justice
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Gerald Keddy South Shore—St. Margaret's, NS

Mr. Speaker, in 2006, our government introduced legislation to put an end to conditional sentences, or house arrest, for serious and violent crimes. However, the bill was repeatedly stalled and eventually gutted by the opposition.

In the last session of Parliament, we reintroduced the bill. The Liberals said they would support it. Now the member for Ajax—Pickering and his Liberal cronies have announced they will oppose this important piece of legislation.

This flip-flop comes as no surprise to Canadians who have come to expect this type of behaviour from the Liberal Party. However, I wonder what the member for Ajax—Pickering's constituents would say, knowing that their member of Parliament opposes a bill to end house arrest for crimes such as aggravated assault, human trafficking, luring a child, arson, fraud and extortion.

I am proud to be a member of the only party that stands up for victims and law-abiding citizens in this country.

Salmon Fishery
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Jean Crowder Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, earlier this week, marine biologist Alexandra Morton left Sointula on her "Get Out Migration" walk down Vancouver Island to raise public awareness about the effects of industrial fish farming on wild salmon.

People around the world are paying attention and demanding that our government recognize that salmon are sacred and protect wild runs. Lax regulating of open-net salmon farms along wild salmon migratory routes has resulted in the transfer of sea lice and disease, contamination of the seabed by waste products and the takeover of habitat by escaped fish.

Canadians, especially in my riding of Nanaimo—Cowichan, want the federal government to apply the Fisheries Act and ban open-net salmon farming near these routes, so we do not lose the food security, thousands of jobs and millions of dollars that wild salmon bring to our province. Alexandra Morton is calling for moving the industrial production of fish to land-based operations away from wild salmon.

Salmon farm families do not have to be left behind. We can have our fish and eat it too, by firm regulation of industrial fish farms and protection of wild salmon runs.

CBC Pollster
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Bev Shipley Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, Frank Graves, the Ekos pollster, is providing interesting advice to the Liberal leader and he is taking it. Graves, who also just happens to be the CBC's pollster of record, has publicly said that the Liberals should: “Stop worrying about the west...No need to fear of polarizing the debate...invoke a culture war. Cosmopolitanism versus parochialism...tolerance versus racism and homophobia, democracy versus autocracy. If the cranky old men in Alberta do not like it, too bad”.

This is unbelievable and highly offensive that the CBC pollster is providing political advice to the Liberal Party to start a cultural war. Graves is hired by the CBC to poll and comment on party politics. He has been a major donor to the Liberal Party; however, he is providing clear and offensive messaging advice to the Liberals.

For the CBC, this is a clear conflict of interest.