House of Commons Hansard #32 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was crime.

Topics

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Crombie Mississauga—Streetsville, ON

Mr. Speaker, special access for special friends.

Every day we learn more. We know the government has more information about its interaction with Green Power Generation.

Earlier this week, the Minister of State for Science and Technology and Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario admitted that his office met with Patrick Glémaud. He said, “There were some projects talked about”.

When will the minister end the Conservative culture of deceit, release all details about the proposals and tell us what he talked about?

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the member is referring to Mr. Jaffer and Mr. Glémaud and their inquiry about three projects.

The parliamentary secretary in question did not support or recommend any of these projects and none of the projects received any funding.

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Anthony Rota Nipissing—Timiskaming, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of State for the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario admitted this week that Patrick Glémaud, Rahim Jaffer's business partner, had submitted at least three proposals for funding to Andrew House, the former director of operations. These proposals seem to have received preferential treatment and special access to the minister's office.

Will the Conservative government break with its culture of deceit and make Mr. Glémaud's three proposals public?

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the question of course is about the Lobbying Act. I would be pleased to inform the member how the act works. It puts the onus on the lobbyists to first register and then report their activities to the Office of the Lobbying Commissioner.

If that member across the way has information suggesting that somebody did break the rules, then he should report that to the lobbyist commissioner for independent investigation.

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Anthony Rota Nipissing—Timiskaming, ON

Mr. Speaker, not only are the Conservatives refusing to disclose the documents, but none of these interactions were reported to the lobbying commissioner, as required under the act.

Mr. House was a Conservative Party candidate in 2006 and again in 2008, so he certainly is familiar with the Federal Accountability Act.

Can the minister tell us why none of these activities were registered with the lobbying commissioner?

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the Lobbying Act was brought in by this government as part of the Federal Accountability Act. It put an end to the revolving door that we saw under the previous Liberal government which led to things like the sponsorship scandal and the gun registry.

Now that we are on the subject of the gun registry, I note that the member promised his constituents he would vote against the gun registry. He thinks it is a waste of money and his rural constituents voted for him believing that he would keep his word.

I expect that he will rise now and reaffirm his commitment to scrap the wasteful Liberal long gun registry.

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

April 23rd, 2010 / 11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative Party president has appealed to party supporters for money to help abolish the firearms registry. That is really quite shameful. The Conservatives see firearms as nothing more than something to help fill party coffers. Too bad if that policy makes firearms more accessible; too bad if safety suffers.

How can the Prime Minister allow his party to collect money at the expense of victims of crime?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, we know that the Bloc, the Liberals and New Democrats have conspired to keep out witnesses from being heard by the committee. In fact, they attempted to stack the entire committee with individuals who were in favour of the gun registry. They would not allow the Calgary Chief of Police to give testimony at the committee.

Why are they so afraid of the truth? Why are they so afraid of what a chief of police will say?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Serge Ménard Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government is being hypocritical when it tries to claim that a backbench MP is behind the dismantling of the firearms registry. We are not fooled. This is a government policy; the Prime Minister speaks out in defence of this project. He authorizes vicious ads and fundraising campaigns.

Why does the Prime Minister always try to sneak his Conservative policies in through the back door?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois, together with the Liberals and New Democrats, attempted to hijack the public safety committee by desperately forcing a pro-long gun registry list of witnesses. They would not hear from any other witnesses other than the ones they specifically hand picked.

That is a culture of deceit being practised by all three parties on the other side.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Thierry St-Cyr Jeanne-Le Ber, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government promised to fast-track family reunification applications from Haiti. However, according to the department's latest numbers, only 311 people on file in the Canadian system have been given permanent resident visas.

How can the minister explain his inability to deliver on his promises?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

St. Catharines
Ontario

Conservative

Rick Dykstra Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, in actual fact, no government has moved quicker in terms of assisting Haiti with respect to the issues it is dealing with.

We said at the very beginning that we would expedite the 2,000 cases that we have on file and that we would make them a priority. We have made them a priority and we are now bringing families back together, just as we committed to do.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Thierry St-Cyr Jeanne-Le Ber, QC

Mr. Speaker, that is simply not plausible. Quebec's Minister of immigration and cultural communities says that the federal government is at fault for the delays. She said that there have been operational problems at the federal level with health and security checks. Quebec and Ottawa need to stop passing the buck.

When will the minister really start working to help Haitian families?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

St. Catharines
Ontario

Conservative

Rick Dykstra Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, I totally reject the premise of the question because it actually is not the case.

On January 16, we said immediately, first, that family class sponsorships would be put forward and, second , spouses or common-law partners with in-Canada class applications, protected persons with family members in Haiti, citizenship and citizenship certificates and in-Canada applications for work permits would be extended on a temporary basis.

We have done more. We have moved this forward. We have said that we would work with the provincial government in Quebec to do exactly what we are trying to do, and that is help Haiti.

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Judy Sgro York West, ON

Mr. Speaker, when we first raised the issue of pensions, the finance minister said that pension reform was not a federal matter. When we asked what was being done to amend the Bankruptcy Act to help pensioners, the Minister of Finance said that the matter had already been resolved.

The issue of pension reform is neither resolved nor is it someone else's problem.

Instead of busily perpetuating the Conservative culture of deceit, why does the government not do something to help these pensioners who are left out in the cold?