House of Commons Hansard #64 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was representation.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

NDP

Pierre-Luc Dusseault Sherbrooke, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is no wonder the minister is in Durban advancing the agenda of his big old friends. That is who he spends his time with. He has met with oil lobbyists almost three times more than he has met with environmental groups, and this is for a Minister of the Environment.

Why is it no surprise that, after all these meetings with oil companies, his government still broke its promise to regulate emissions from the oil sands this year?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, we seek to understand the viewpoints of all stakeholders with regard to environmental stewardship, which is why we consult industry and environmental groups and why we have a strong sector-by-sector regulatory approach that seeks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and balances both environmental stewardship and economic sustainability.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, this week, Statistics Canada projected a 70% rise in Canada's aboriginal population over the next two decades. Given these numbers and the limited dollars being invested, we can project that evermore aboriginal people will be living under the appalling conditions that Canadians have witnessed in the past few weeks. One in four aboriginal children already lives in poverty.

When will the government finally honour its treaties and deliver the necessary dollars for the infrastructure for Canada's aboriginal communities?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, we have been working in collaboration with willing partners in the first nations communities because we understand the demographics. We understand the infrastructure needs. We have invested significantly more than any other government, We continue to find productive and innovative ways to address these issues. We also want to get value for money.

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, in a document called “A Guide For Ministers and Ministers of State”, dated 2011 and signed by the Prime Minister, in section F.4. under the heading “Ministers and the law” there is the statement, “All government activity must take place in accordance with the law”.

It is rather surprising that that needs to be written down but it is good to hear.

A court of competent jurisdiction has ruled that the conduct of the Minister of Agriculture is “an affront to the rule of law”. Therefore, the minister has violated the Canadian Wheat Board Act and he has clearly violated the Prime Minister's guidelines.

What are the consequences for ministers who violate the Prime Minister's guidelines?

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, the consequences for western Canadian farmers when we pass this bill will be that they will finally have marketing freedom. They will have the same freedom as farmers across the rest of the country.

As noted, the judge himself said that this decision had no practical impact. Nevertheless, despite that, our government will be appealing that ruling and I am told that we will be appealing it today.

Justice
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Justin Trudeau Papineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, last spring, this government chose to be found in contempt of Parliament rather than disclosing the real costs of its tough on crime bill. Today, we know why. The Institut de recherche et d'informations socio-économiques estimates the cost of their more-prisons-less-justice bill at $19 billion, most of which will be paid by the provinces. Nineteen billion dollars for an approach that was a dismal failure in the United States, instead of investing in prevention and protecting our youth. That is shameful. When will they recognize—

Justice
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Conservative

Justice
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Delta—Richmond East
B.C.

Conservative

Kerry-Lynne Findlay Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are concerned about crime and that is why they gave our government a strong mandate to keep our streets and communities safe. The cost of crime on society far exceeds the cost of fighting crime. This report referred to is ridiculous. As we have already disclosed, the federal cost of our current crime legislation will be less than 1% of what the opposition claims.

Part of keeping our communities safe is keeping dangerous criminals behind bars, not releasing them on to our streets before they serve their sentences.

Democratic Republic of the Congo
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, last week in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, millions of Congolese people voted at 63,000 polling stations. After the vote, each polling station posted its results outside. Today the election commission is tallying the results, but it is using only the total figures; there is no way to verify the accuracy of the results. International observers with the Carter Center have asked the election commission to post the results of each individual polling station. The Congolese diaspora is asking for the same.

Will the Canadian government add its voice to those that are calling for transparency in the elections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo?

Democratic Republic of the Congo
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I will first acknowledge the interest of my colleague in this important issue. We are obviously very concerned with the violence and the significant amount of protests there have been as a result of the elections in the Congo. We want to see the most open and transparent election possible and the reporting of those results.

I completely agree with the member opposite. Canada would be very pleased to support such a request.

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Françoise Boivin Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians play by the rules and they expect their government to do the same. As the chief justice of Alberta, Catherine Fraser, said in a ruling earlier this year:

When government does not comply with the law, this is not merely non-compliance with a particular law, it is an affront to the rule of law itself….

My question is a simple one and a yes or no will do. Does the government agree with the statement by Chief Justice Fraser?

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

December 9th, 2011 / 11:40 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, we are in agreement with western Canadian farmers that they want certainty as soon as possible. They want certainty on January 1, 2012. They want to know that they can go out and start to book their contracts for next year and they want to know that they can deal with the people who they want to deal with. They want freedom and we will give them that.

The hearings are proceeding through the Senate committee. The bill will go back to the Senate. We look forward to the passing of Bill C-18 and we look forward to western Canadian farmers finally having the same freedoms that everyone else in Canada already has.

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Françoise Boivin Gatineau, QC

Madam Speaker, I did not hear any yes or no there.

Perhaps the government will not answer the question because it has a habit of breaking the law, as it did, for example, by going over its election budget, in violation of the Elections Act; by destroying government documents, in violation of the Access to Information Act; by sharing veterans' personal information, in violation of the Privacy Act; and now by ignoring prairie farmers, in violation of the Canadian Wheat Board Act.

Why does this arrogant government, which is always on the defensive, seem to think that there is one set of rules for it and another set for the rest of Canada?

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, when Mr. Oberg came down, he asked if members would join with him in interfering as much as possible with this bill. He asked them if they would hold the bill off until our introduction of it would disrupt the markets in western Canada. It looks like the NDP members took him seriously.

We need to get this bill passed. We need to get it in place so western Canadian farmers can begin to plant their crop , grow their crop next year and harvest their crop with the certainty that they will be able to market it as well.