House of Commons Hansard #135 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was information.

Topics

Political Financing
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I regret that my hon. colleague has misrepresented the nature of this dispute. In fact it is an administrative dispute and not as he has characterized it.

This is in fact a five year old accounting dispute. Fortunately, the Federal Court has already ruled in favour of the Conservative Party and against Elections Canada in this very matter.

Political Financing
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, the 2006 Conservative campaign in Lac-Saint-Louis is a perfect example of the in and out scandal that led to criminal charges against two Conservative senators and two close friends of the Prime Minister.

This is how it goes with the Conservatives in Lac-Saint-Louis: first they re-channel money through a fraudulent scheme, then they appoint someone to the Senate and give him a half-million dollars a year of taxpayers' money for campaigning.

How can the Prime Minister show such contempt for the people of Lac-Saint-Louis?

Political Financing
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member's question contains several errors. I do not have time to correct them all, but I will say that this is an administrative dispute that has been going on for five years. Fortunately, the Federal Court has already ruled in favour of the Conservative Party and against Elections Canada.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Olivia Chow Trinity—Spadina, ON

Mr. Speaker, today's G20 report shows that Canadians are still traumatized by what happened and are still looking for answers.

To date no one has stepped forward to claimed responsibility for the massive assault on people's right to free speech and to free assembly. No one has been held accountable.

Only a public inquiry can repair the damage done to our democracy. When will the government call a public inquiry and get to the bottom of what went wrong?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, as the member is aware, specific bodies do exist to handle complaints regarding the conduct of the police. As has been said many times before, we encourage anyone who has a complaint to direct their concerns to the appropriate body.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Olivia Chow Trinity—Spadina, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is unbelievable.

When free speech is denied in the only designated free speech zone, when women are aggressively strip-searched in a warehouse, and when an amputee is dragged off without his leg, Canadians know there is something desperately wrong.

People need to trust the government will not simply suspend their civil liberties. An inquiry with participation from the public is the only way to restore this trust.

What does the government have to hide? Why will it not call a public inquiry?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, as the member knows there are processes in place to deal with police conduct and it would be inappropriate for me to comment any further on disciplinary or criminal matters.

Research and Development
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Mike Wallace Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, our government is investing record amounts in science and technology.

We have seen tremendous results over the past five years. However we also know that Canadian businesses need to invest more in research and development as our economy continues to recover from the global recession for hard-working Canadian families to enjoy a higher standard of living.

Can the Minister of Industry update the House on what the government is doing to support innovation and helping business bring new ideas to the marketplace?

Research and Development
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I would be happy to. Indeed, this year alone, the government has been spending $11.7 billion in partnership with academia, with our research institutions and with the private sector to make sure we are second to none when it comes to research and development, when it comes to innovation throughout the world.

Today I was at EMS Technologies in Kanata. It provides advanced satellite communications. It is the best in the world. A lot of what it does is make sure our airplanes are safer and our communications can occur.

That is the kind of leading technology that Canadians are involved in and we are proud to support them.

Access to Information
Oral Questions

February 28th, 2011 / 2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, five years of Conservative government and Canadians' right to information has been severely eroded.

This is the most secretive government in Canadian history. According to Government Information Quarterly, Canada has gone from first to worst. The Government of Canada misled the OECD, saying a single portal would be ready by the fall of 2010. At committee, the top government information official admitted there is actually no open government policy.

Why is the government dragging its feet? What does it have to hide?

Access to Information
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day President of the Treasury Board and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, right now two departments are involved in what we would call an open portal approach. Included in that are other departments that are proactively publishing their access to information requests.

I can also encourage my hon. friend by telling her that this particular policy will be expanded to other departments. As she sees that move forward, I am hoping that she will embrace that policy.

High Tides in Eastern Quebec
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Claude Guimond Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Quebec government has announced that all individuals, businesses and municipalities that suffered extensive damage as a result of the high tides in eastern Quebec last December will get help from a specific, improved assistance program. Overall, 17 measures will be simplified or improved. We are still waiting for the federal government's contribution.

Will the Conservatives, who have raised expectations considerably in the region, finally deliver the goods and help the disaster victims?

High Tides in Eastern Quebec
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, if my colleague is referring to the storm damage that affected small craft harbours, DFO staff have already done the inspections there. They are putting in place a plan to make the necessary repairs in time for the fishing season for the ones that are most seriously affected.

Status of Women
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, a judge appointed by the Conservative government just took women's rights back 20 years. He gave a convicted rapist a slap on the wrist because of what he called the victim's suggestive attire.

We know that over 90% of sexual assaults go unreported because of the lack of confidence women have in the system.

What will the Minister for Status of Women do to restore women's faith in the justice system?

Status of Women
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, as the member knows, I was in Winnipeg on Thursday and I made my views very clear. This government does not feel that this kind of message is what victims need to hear. We established long ago in this country that no means no and I hope that any messages like this do not have any impact on any victims coming forward to report sexual abuse or sexual assault in the future.