Oil Tanker Moratorium Act

An Act respecting the regulation of vessels that transport crude oil or persistent oil to or from ports or marine installations located along British Columbia's north coast

Sponsor

Marc Garneau  Liberal

Status

This bill has received Royal Assent and is, or will soon become, law.

Summary

This is from the published bill. The Library of Parliament often publishes better independent summaries.

This enactment enacts the Oil Tanker Moratorium Act, which prohibits oil tankers that are carrying more than 12 500 metric tons of crude oil or persistent oil as cargo from stopping, or unloading crude oil or persistent oil, at ports or marine installations located along British Columbia’s north coast from the northern tip of Vancouver Island to the Alaska border. The Act prohibits loading if it would result in the oil tanker carrying more than 12 500 metric tons of those oils as cargo.

The Act also prohibits vessels and persons from transporting crude oil or persistent oil between oil tankers and those ports or marine installations for the purpose of aiding the oil tanker to circumvent the prohibitions on oil tankers.

Finally, the Act establishes an administration and enforcement regime that includes requirements to provide information and to follow directions and that provides for penalties of up to a maximum of five million dollars.

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Votes

June 18, 2019 Passed Motion respecting Senate amendments to Bill C-48, An Act respecting the regulation of vessels that transport crude oil or persistent oil to or from ports or marine installations located along British Columbia's north coast
June 18, 2019 Passed Motion for closure
May 8, 2018 Passed 3rd reading and adoption of Bill C-48, An Act respecting the regulation of vessels that transport crude oil or persistent oil to or from ports or marine installations located along British Columbia's north coast
May 1, 2018 Passed Concurrence at report stage of Bill C-48, An Act respecting the regulation of vessels that transport crude oil or persistent oil to or from ports or marine installations located along British Columbia's north coast
May 1, 2018 Failed Bill C-48, An Act respecting the regulation of vessels that transport crude oil or persistent oil to or from ports or marine installations located along British Columbia's north coast (report stage amendment)
Oct. 4, 2017 Passed 2nd reading of Bill C-48, An Act respecting the regulation of vessels that transport crude oil or persistent oil to or from ports or marine installations located along British Columbia's north coast
Oct. 4, 2017 Passed Time allocation for Bill C-48, An Act respecting the regulation of vessels that transport crude oil or persistent oil to or from ports or marine installations located along British Columbia's north coast

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 6:45 p.m.
See context

Liberal

Marc Garneau Liberal Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount, QC

Madam Speaker, I do not accept the premise of the question. As we all know, my dear colleagues in the NDP have never understood the fact that we take an approach that is balanced between moving forward with the economy, but also taking a very responsible attitude with respect to the environment.

Having said that, I want to thank NDP members who, in May 2018, voted in favour of the moratorium of Bill C-48. I want to also point out one particular member, the member for Skeena—Bulkley Valley, who has been absolutely fantastic with respect to mobilizing all the support necessary for us to pass this bill. I thank him for that.

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 6:50 p.m.
See context

Conservative

Rachael Harder Conservative Lethbridge, AB

Madam Speaker, Bill C-48 is a direct attack on Canada's economy. It will tie up or prevent tanker traffic from travelling in northern B.C.

The problem with this is the hypocrisy at the core, which is this. Venezuelan oil is accepted in Quebec and Saudi Arabian oil is accepted on the east coast. Both of these countries have very few, if any, environmental regulations. Both of these countries treat their citizens with absolute disrespect. Human rights barely, if at all, exist within these countries.

Meanwhile, within our own country, we have a government that wants to tie up the responsible development of the oil industry, thus harming our overall economy and our place on the world stage. Why the hypocrisy?

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 6:50 p.m.
See context

Liberal

Marc Garneau Liberal Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount, QC

Madam Speaker, may I correct a couple of things there? According to a 2018 analysis by the National Bank, 44% of Quebec's oil is sourced from western Canada, with another 37% from the United States. Only 19% comes from overseas, with the largest chunk, 11%, coming from Algeria not from Saudi Arabia. In light of these facts, would the opposition member like to take this opportunity to thank Quebeckers for helping sustain the oil patch in the west through this difficult period caused by a drop in world prices of crude oil?

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 6:50 p.m.
See context

Liberal

Robert-Falcon Ouellette Liberal Winnipeg Centre, MB

Madam Speaker, I was just reading about the new agreement or what the government just approved. It was allowing the extra earnings from the TMX to fund clean energy transition. This is about striking a balance, and this bill here is about ensuring that there is a balance. I know that there are people there who have—

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 6:50 p.m.
See context

Liberal

Robert-Falcon Ouellette Liberal Winnipeg Centre, MB

Madam Speaker, I wish the member for New Westminster—Burnaby could be a bit more polite as I try to offer my thoughts.

Balance is truly something that we need to have. We had this opportunity to hear the minister speak a bit about that balance and how we have to ensure that indigenous peoples also have the opportunity to get jobs and provide for their families and to be part owners of this, having equity and then using those funds to transition to a cleaner and better economy. Striking that balance for each and every Canadian is important.

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 6:50 p.m.
See context

Liberal

Marc Garneau Liberal Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount, QC

Madam Speaker, my colleague really has hit the centre of the bull's eye by talking about the fact that, yes, we are stewards of the environment but we also are very concerned about trying to address economic issues and economic opportunities for first nations. That is essentially the approach that we as a party have taken from the beginning. It is not an either/or issue, where we forget about the environment, like the Conservatives, or in the case of the New Democrats, where we forget about the economy. We have actually, in our opinion, hit the sweet spot by trying to address both.

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 6:50 p.m.
See context

NDP

Pierre Nantel NDP Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, QC

Madam Speaker, as part of this exchange, I would like to hear the Liberal government explain why it believes that tripling oil sands production will not triple pollution. It could have decided to support Alberta's economy, which I understand, by requiring the increased production to be offset by a decrease in emissions per barrel. However, there is no mention of that. This is an election ploy designed to obfuscate. The government is talking out of both sides of its mouth. I will ask a very straightforward question.

How can the Liberal government believe that tripling production will not triple pollution?

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 6:55 p.m.
See context

Liberal

Marc Garneau Liberal Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount, QC

I apologize, Madam Speaker.

The problem with my colleague is that the only thing that matters to him is the environment. In his eyes, the economy does not count. He talked about campaign speeches. The wealth that flows from our energy sector allows us to build hospitals and schools in Quebec, but he does not talk about that. We are striking a balance between the economy and the environment.

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 6:55 p.m.
See context

Conservative

David Anderson Conservative Cypress Hills—Grasslands, SK

Madam Speaker, the government's environmental plan is all show and no go. Yesterday, we saw a climate emergency declaration that is all show and no go. That is on top of the fact that today the Liberals brought in a pipeline approval that is all show and absolutely no go. Now, we are dealing with Bill C-48, which is all show and no go. That is on top of the foundation of the Liberals' climate plan, which is a tax plan and not a climate change plan; again, it is all show and no go. Does the minister realize how much of a joke Canadians realize his environmental program actually is?

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 6:55 p.m.
See context

Liberal

Marc Garneau Liberal Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount, QC

Madam Speaker, talking about all show and no go, I think we are at day 420, waiting for the environmental climate change plan that is going to come from the Conservatives. Hopefully, it will come tomorrow. Tomorrow we will find out how they will magically take care of everything with absolutely no impact on anybody. That is the thing I am waiting to hear tomorrow.

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 6:55 p.m.
See context

NDP

Pierre-Luc Dusseault NDP Sherbrooke, QC

Madam Speaker, I am a bit disappointed in the meaningless answer the minister gave to the question from my colleague from Longueuil—Saint-Hubert. He said that we need to build Trans Mountain and triple the pipeline's capacity to export our crude oil because my colleague drives to Ottawa in a car. What a pointless thing to say.

What does the fact that my colleague drives to Ottawa have to do with exporting crude oil from the oil sands, which we buy back as refined oil to fuel our gas-powered cars?

Can he explain his twisted logic?

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 6:55 p.m.
See context

Liberal

Marc Garneau Liberal Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount, QC

Madam Speaker, what I meant was that some people can be naive or hypocritical when it comes to energy. It is important to recognize that we need to look after the environment and the economy at the same time.

Tens of thousands of people rely on the energy sector, and this sector contributes to our country's wealth, allowing us to build schools and hospitals in Quebec. That is the reality, but those who are constantly criticizing energy development never recognize that.

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 6:55 p.m.
See context

Conservative

Mark Strahl Conservative Chilliwack—Hope, BC

Madam Speaker, when the government cancelled the northern gateway pipeline project and brought in the tanker ban, the Liberals tore $2 billion in equity away from the Aboriginal Equity Partners, $2 billion for aboriginal communities in northern B.C. where there is not much economic development. When we asked Liberals about it, they said they did not even consult them before they brought this in.

There is another project, the Eagle Spirit pipeline, completely indigenous owned, that has been shut down by Bill C-48 and the northern tanker ban. The Nisga'a Nation has expressed interest in having a port for a future pipeline, and the government has shut it down.

Why has the government shut down and torn away so much economic opportunity from indigenous Canadians in northern British Columbia?

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 6:55 p.m.
See context

Liberal

Marc Garneau Liberal Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount, QC

Madam Speaker, I disagree with that characterization of the situation, because there are still plenty of opportunities.

Let me talk about the example of the massive LNG project out of Kitimat. That will provide opportunities for first nations and others along the northern coast. I would also add, again, because people seem to be focused only on the persistent oils, that this is not a ban on non-persistent oils. I would recommend that my colleague check the schedule in Bill C-48 to find out which products are banned. He will also realize that certain products are not banned and can be exported by tanker from the north coast.

Motion That Debate Be Not Further AdjournedOil Tanker Moratorium ActGovernment Orders

June 18th, 2019 / 7 p.m.
See context

NDP

Robert Aubin NDP Trois-Rivières, QC

Madam Speaker, the environment is the NDP's priority. We do not have a top priority. We have just one priority.

What the NDP knows, but the Liberals are slow to understand, is that in order to balance the economy and the environment, we also need to transform the economy. If we truly want to talk about a transition, we will eventually have to stop investing in fossil fuels and invest elsewhere.

Does the minister agree that it is time to transform the economy so that we can meet our environmental targets?