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House of Commons Hansard #119 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was agriculture.

Topics

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

Nick Discepola Liberal Vaudreuil, QC

As I said, the likes of serial killers like Mr. Olson and others would have fallen under the previous legislation. Instead, the legislation said that the government would repeal section 745 for multiple serial killers. They will not be able to apply.

In addition, in order to condemn a criminal in our society, only one jurist need object and the person is then innocent. That was changed. In order to apply for early parole eligibility the jurists must be unanimous, 13 out of 13. It seems to me that if 13 jurists agree that this person should apply for early parole, and again I stress, apply, for eligibility. It does not mean that they will get it.

Only the most naive politician would believe that Clifford Olson would ever get early parole. I am appalled to hear the Reform Party and other members hide behind Mr. Olson to promote their own political agenda. If that party had voted with the government in the spring, Clifford Olson would not even be able to apply. That is what the debate is about. Shame on those members.

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

Liberal

John Nunziata Liberal York South—Weston, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am frankly surprised that the parliamentary secretary would continue to be dishonest about the true facts. The fact is, had the government acted-

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Milliken)

Order. I think the hon. member for York South-Weston, an experienced member, knows that it would be quite improper to suggest that any hon. member is dishonest. I would ask him to consider his words very carefully and, in fact, withdraw the words he used in suggesting that the parliamentary secretary is dishonest.

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

Liberal

John Nunziata Liberal York South—Weston, ON

Mr. Speaker, I unequivocally withdraw that. However, I would like to add that it is an unequivocal misstatement of fact to suggest that Clifford Olson would not have been able to apply for parole. If the government repealed section 745 when my private member's bill was before Parliament, he would not have had the opportunity to apply.

I am not suggesting that Clifford Olson would ever be released prematurely. I am objecting to the fact this law gives him the right to drag the families of victims through the criminal justice system again after serving only 15 years. That is the injustice of section 745.

I conclude with this. Eighty per cent of those who apply are successful. Is that the result the government wants, to prematurely release convicted killers?

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Milliken)

Is the House ready for the question?

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

Some hon. members

Question.

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Milliken)

Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

Some hon. members

No.

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Milliken)

All those in favour will please say yea.

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

Some hon. members

Yea.

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Milliken)

All those opposed will please say nay.

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

Some hon. members

Nay.

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Milliken)

In my opinion the nays have it.

And more that five members having risen:

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

The Speaker

Call in the members.

And the bells having rung:

Bill C-234Routine Proceedings

11 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Milliken)

At the request of the government whip, the division on the motion stands deferred until 5.30 p.m. today.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

December 12th, 1996 / 11 a.m.

Reform

Jack Frazer Reform Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36, it is my duty and honour to present two petitions to the House, duly certified by the clerk of petitions on behalf of 416 individuals from across Canada.

The first petition, signed by 28 Canadians, calls on Parliament to urge the federal government to join with the provincial governments to make the national highway system upgrading possible beginning in 1997.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

11 a.m.

Reform

Jack Frazer Reform Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, the second petition signed by 388 Canadians, asks Parliament to zero rate books, magazines and newspapers under the GST.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, this is a petition sponsored by the Canadian Automobile Association entitled Roads Work.

The petitioners call on Parliament to urge the federal government to join with the provincial governments to make the upgrading of the national highway system possible in 1997.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Jake Hoeppner Reform Lisgar—Marquette, MB

Mr. Speaker, I have five petitions to present to the House today.

Three of the petitions pray that Parliament have our present laws on obscenity strictly upheld thus demonstrating a will to protect the men, women and children of Canada from pornography.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Jake Hoeppner Reform Lisgar—Marquette, MB

Mr. Speaker, in the other two petitions the constituents point out that in the last 10 years gasoline prices have risen 466 per cent.

The petitioners request that Parliament not increase the federal excise tax on gasoline in the next election. I fully agree with their prayer.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Bob Ringma Reform Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to present a petition signed by about 650 British Columbians, some of whom are my constituents.

The petitioners ask that reading not be taxed. They state that the application of the 7 per cent GST to reading material is unfair and wrong. Therefore, they urge all levels of government to demonstrate their commitment to education and literacy by eliminating the sales tax on reading materials.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Liberal Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition from the citizens of Peterborough who wish to abolish nuclear weapons.

The petitioners point out that 30,000 nuclear weapons still exist on earth. They also point out that the International Court of Justice stated that there exists an obligation to pursuing good faith and

bring to a conclusion negotiations leading to nuclear disarmament in all its aspects under strict, effective international control.

The petitioners pray and request that Parliament support the immediate initiation and conclusion by the year 2000 of an international convention which will set out a binding timetable for the abolition of all nuclear weapons.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Liberal Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have another petition which is from residents who are concerned about the state of the national highway system.

The petitioners call on Parliament and urge the federal government to join with provincial governments to make the upgrading of the national highway system possible.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Liberal Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, my last petition is from citizens of Peterborough who are concerned about the national AIDS strategy.

The petitioners point out that the national AIDS strategy, phase II, will expire on March 31, 1998 and that there is no commitment to renew or extend it.

The petitioners call on Parliament to ensure dedicated AIDS funding beyond March 1998 and to renew the national AIDS strategy.