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House of Commons Hansard #156 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was history.

Topics

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Halifax West Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan LiberalMinister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, this government treats every Canadian the same. I find it remarkable and hypocritical to hear that party that opposes every environmental measure this government brings forward talk about the environment.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Jason Kenney Conservative Calgary Southeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, lectures on hypocrisy from the Liberals.

The Prime Minister said, “poisoning the water is a crime and persistent and wilful polluters must be treated as criminals”. He said the same thing about the ad scam Liberals but none of them have gone to jail. Why is it that whenever a Liberal breaks the law it is okay, but ordinary Canadians have to pay the price?

It is a very simple question. Will the government in its dying days show that it has learned something from ad scam, that there is one rule of law in this country, and prosecute the Prime Minister's shipping empire for poisoning our water?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Halifax West Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan LiberalMinister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, that is no more than empty rhetoric. No one is above the law and due process will follow. For that party that opposes every environmental measure to raise an issue like this is sheer hypocrisy.

Royal Canadian Mounted PoliceOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Kevin Sorenson Conservative Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Auditor General criticized the government for shortfalls within RCMP resources for contract policing. Other RCMP personnel shortfalls are causing backlogs within DNA forensic labs, and with fingerprinting, background checks and access to information requests. These Liberal-made shortfalls are seriously jeopardizing public safety and delaying justice being served.

Can the minister tell the House how many RCMP positions were slashed and how many dollars were cut from its budget prior to 9/11 by the government?

Royal Canadian Mounted PoliceOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton Centre Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, one could not do much better than quote the Commissioner of the RCMP before committee. This is what the commissioner had to say:

It took the RCMP years to go from a zero budget to a $2 billion budget, but in the last six years our budget has gone from $2 billion to over $3 billion. I think that speaks to how much the government and society have supported our endeavours. We have received a lot of money.

Therefore, that means a lot of new resources.

Royal Canadian Mounted PoliceOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Kevin Sorenson Conservative Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, one of the first things that the government did upon taking office was to slash 2,200 positions from the RCMP, a loss that has never been recouped.

If the Deputy Prime Minister wants to quote the RCMP commissioner, I will as well. He openly admitted that 2,000 officers were moved off organized crime files and other duties to respond to the terrorism crisis. The Canadian Police Association pleaded with the government to provide better funding after it identified serious shortfalls in local, provincial and national policing.

Why, when a policing shortfall was identified, did the government not respond immediately?

Royal Canadian Mounted PoliceOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Edmonton Centre Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, first of all, I find it amazing. The hon. member should know, because he serves on the public safety and emergency preparedness subcommittee of the justice committee, that there is not a police force in the western world that did not reallocate police resources after 9/11 to deal with the terrorist threat. I just hope he is not suggesting that.

Let me also tell the hon. member that in fact, RCMP Depot in Regina has received new resources. It is training more officers than ever. We are going to put more resources into RCMP Depot to increase its ability to train more resources.

Shipbuilding IndustryOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Jean-Yves Roy Bloc Matapédia—Matane, QC

Mr. Speaker, in granting contracts to repair ships, the current government policy factors in the cost of moving the ships, which favours Maritime shipyards over those in Quebec.

Since the government is currently reviewing its policy, does it intend to consider regional equity in order to give Quebec's shipyards a real chance?

Shipbuilding IndustryOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Vancouver Kingsway B.C.

Liberal

David Emerson LiberalMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, we are working with the shipbuilding industry to ensure that government procurement--and there is going to be a large wave of procurement of vessels over the next 15 years--will go primarily to Canadian yards. We will be working closely with the industry to ensure that their areas of strength in technology and shipbuilding get built on and become part of a globally competitive industry.

Shipbuilding IndustryOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Jean-Yves Roy Bloc Matapédia—Matane, QC

Mr. Speaker, those are just words. The lack of policy on shipbuilding allows the current Minister of Public Works and Government Services to favour the Irving shipyards over those in Quebec.

Does the minister realize that if there had been a true shipbuilding policy—as the Bloc has been asking for for 10 years—it would have favoured not only regional development, but also healthy competition and real distributive justice?

Shipbuilding IndustryOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Vancouver Kingsway B.C.

Liberal

David Emerson LiberalMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I really do not know what the hon. member is talking about. We are working with the industry to ensure that all operators, all shipbuilders and all people that are in the servicing end of that business, in all parts of Canada, have fair access to government shipbuilding contracts. That is going to be our approach going forward and that is going to be very healthy for the shipbuilding, services and repair industries.

JusticeOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Daryl Kramp Conservative Prince Edward—Hastings, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the justice committee heard from Don Schiemann, father of slain RCMP officer Peter Schiemann. He stated that our justice system just simply is “not working” and said:

--change must begin here and now....if we bury our heads in academic sand and hide behind political expediency, then be assured we will have to deal with another March 3rd, and if for lack of change, the horror of March 3rd happens again, the blood of those men and women will be on our heads.

I ask the Prime Minister, how many preventable deaths will occur before this Liberal government finally gets serious about gun crime?

JusticeOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Mount Royal Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I met yesterday with Reverend Schiemann. I spoke yesterday also with members of the African Canadian coalition who met with the Prime Minister. Both sought a balanced and inclusive package. That is exactly what we are introducing with 10 legislative measures, to be tabled this Friday, for more effective law enforcement.

There is one thing those members refuse to speak about, which is the hope and opportunities package for the victims of crime, rather than the exploiting of tragedy as those members seek to do every day in this House.

JusticeOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Nina Grewal Conservative Fleetwood—Port Kells, BC

Mr. Speaker, record numbers of murders are happening on the streets of the lower mainland of B.C. Already 34 people have been killed in gun violence this year. Two more were murdered this week.

Gun violence is not just a Toronto problem. It is a Canadian problem. While the Prime Minister is holding summits and committing millions of dollars to combat gun crimes in Toronto, British Columbians have had to set up community groups to tackle gun violence. When will the Prime Minister scrap the useless gun registry and start investing in more police for our streets?

JusticeOral Questions

3 p.m.

Mount Royal Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, with our initiatives to combat guns and gangs and urban violence we are legislating for the whole of Canada, not part of Canada.

TaxationOral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Ruby Dhalla Liberal Brampton—Springdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians from coast to coast are working day in and day out to build a better future for themselves, their children and their families.

In the economic and fiscal update, the government has promised to lower personal taxes for low and modest income Canadian families. Could the Minister of Finance please tell this House what this tax reduction that has been announced will mean to a Canadian family of four with a modest income?

TaxationOral Questions

3 p.m.

Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, we are increasing the basic exemptions and we are reducing personal tax rates. For the average Canadian family of four earning $60,000, that will mean initially a saving of about 20%. It will mean ultimately, at the end of five years, a saving of 33% or a cumulative saving over that period of time of $3,300.

At the same time, we are investing in learning and skills and in innovation and trade. We are producing higher disposable incomes, a better standard of living and a stronger Canadian quality of life. That is what good government is all about.

JusticeOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Russ Hiebert Conservative South Surrey—White Rock—Cloverdale, BC

Mr. Speaker, Robert Osbourne, the “bait car” auto thief, was convicted in June of this past year, yet he is eligible for parole as early as this December. He is supposedly serving four years for a string of auto thefts and a reckless high speed chase. He exceeded speeds of 140 kilometres an hour in residential areas.

There have already been 11 deaths related to auto theft in B.C. this year. When will the justice minister stand up and stop parole for dangerous criminals? Why does four years mean only six months in the Liberal soft on crime justice system?

JusticeOral Questions

3 p.m.

Mount Royal Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, when we tabled the legislation with respect to conditional sentence reform, which regrettably we have not been able to get adopted, we made it clear that there will be no conditional sentences with regard to those who are engaged in those kinds of serious auto offences. We have also introduced legislation with respect to making street racing an aggravated offence. There have been a number of initiatives. If the opposition would have joined us in passing those initiatives, we would be combating those kinds of auto injuries and deaths.

Correctional Service of CanadaOral Questions

November 23rd, 2005 / 3 p.m.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Conservative Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, Correctional Service of Canada officials have quietly hired handlers to follow released pedophiles everywhere they go. Two pedophiles in British Columbia who recently completed their jail sentences are considered extremely dangerous predators who will assault children again if left unsupervised. Most halfway houses in B.C. have rejected them as being too risky. It is absurd to think that they can successfully track pedophiles 24/7.

Why is the Liberal government putting children at risk by releasing extremely dangerous pedophiles into our communities?

Correctional Service of CanadaOral Questions

3 p.m.

Edmonton Centre Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, I am sure the hon. member understands that if an accused person who is incarcerated has reached his warrant expiry date, there is absolutely no legal way that we can continue to hold him in a federal prison.

In fact, the police in the local jurisdiction can seek a section 810 order. Local prosecutors can, obviously at an earlier stage in the process, seek to have the person declared either a dangerous or a long term offender, but that has to be done at the time of the conviction and sentencing. Therefore, I think the--

Correctional Service of CanadaOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Rimouski-Neigette--Témiscouata--Les Basques.

Pointe-au-Père WharfOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Bloc

Louise Thibault Bloc Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, Transport Canada is responsible for the wharves it still owns. When human safety is at risk, work must be done as promptly as possible because any delay constitutes a real danger, even when a wharf has been declared out of service. That is the case with the Pointe-au-Père wharf, which is a threat to the community. Any delay is unacceptable and if the minister does not believe me, I have pictures that clearly illustrate my concerns.

Can the Minister of Transport tell us when the Pointe-au-Père wharf will be filled in with rock and made safe?

Pointe-au-Père WharfOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Outremont Québec

Liberal

Jean Lapierre LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, obviously wharves that are no longer used for fishing or commercial purposes and that have no takers in the community eventually have to be filled in with rock, as does the Pointe-au-Père wharf. We must do this as soon as possible. Unfortunately, eventually we must get rid of it for good. Then, over time, nature will take care of cleaning up the shore. This will be taken care of as soon as possible.

Public ServiceOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Godbout Liberal Ottawa—Orléans, ON

Mr. Speaker, constituents in my riding are concerned about the under-representation of visible minorities in the federal public service, government agencies or as appointees on boards of crown corporations. What action does the President of the Treasury Board intend or plan to take to correct this situation?