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House of Commons Hansard #93 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was liberal.

Topics

FisheriesOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Loyola Hearn Conservative St. John's South, NL

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans knows that there is a major dispute going on in Newfoundland and Labrador in relation to the crab fishery. This is strictly a provincial problem.

Will the minister ensure that his officials have up to date data in relation to the condition of the stock and the soft shell problem, so that he can adjust the dates to ensure that all those affected can maximize any benefits from a change in the season?

FisheriesOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Winnipeg South Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock LiberalPresident of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans I would simply say that he is working on that very question today. I know he has a deep interest in this issue. He wants to do what he can to ensure that the people making these decisions have all the information they need. I have every confidence that he will.

Natural ResourcesOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Rob Moore Conservative Fundy, NB

Mr. Speaker, the transparent attempt by the Liberals to buy votes around the country is spinning out of control. This week the Prime Minister confirmed that he gave the political minister for New Brunswick instructions to deliver a one-off deal for the province of New Brunswick to offset the Atlantic accord.

Now we find that the minister is backtracking and that he had not even consulted the finance minister on what political operatives were saying was another billion dollar deal. No details were given on the plan to spend money that the finance minister claims we do not have.

Will the minister admit that this has nothing to do with New Brunswick's needs and everything to do with an upcoming election?

Natural ResourcesOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Finance

Not at all, Mr. Speaker. The premier of New Brunswick was here two or three weeks ago. He had a very good conversation with the Prime Minister about certain issues with respect to New Brunswick. Those issues were not yet sufficiently advanced to be responded to.

The Prime Minister, quite logically, has asked ministers in his government, including the minister who represents the province of New Brunswick, to pursue these issues and to see if we can arrive at a successful conclusion.

LabourOral Question Period

May 6th, 2005 / 11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Joy Smith Conservative Kildonan—St. Paul, MB

Mr. Speaker, a major scam is being played out by a Liberal-NDP partnership in Manitoba. The government is trampling on the rights of individuals working on the expansion of the Red River floodway. Manitoba construction workers are being forced to pay $2.91 per hour per day in union dues even though they are not unionized. This adds millions of dollars to the union coffers with no benefit to the project or to the taxpayer.

When the President of the Treasury Board was approached by the Manitoba construction companies for assistance, why did he refuse to act?

LabourOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Winnipeg South Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock LiberalPresident of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, as is often the case in the House, the allegations of the member opposite are completely false. I was indeed approached by the members of the construction union and they asked that a mediator be appointed.

I worked with the premier and a mediator was appointed. An agreement was arrived at that is believed to be fair on behalf of everyone and allows us to get on with the work of building this important resource. Some members have refused to abide by the very agreement that they were a part of.

Government ContractsOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Conservative Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, section 14 of the Parliament of Canada Act says:

No person who is a member of the Senate shall, directly or indirectly, knowingly and wilfully be a party to or be concerned in any contract under which the public money of Canada is to be paid.

As CEO and a $30 million shareholder in a company that has a $100 million contract with the government, Liberal Senator Massicotte is breaking the law. Why will the Prime Minister not ask him--

Government ContractsOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

The Speaker

I have grave reservations about that question. First of all, the hon. member knows he cannot speak disrespectfully of the other place, and suggesting that some other member of Parliament, admittedly of the other House, has broken the law in my view is out of order.

The hon. member for Terrebonne—Blainville.

Sponsorship ProgramOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Bloc Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, I want to recapitulate a bit: Liberal Party volunteers were paid with the dirty sponsorship money; the Liberal Party violated electoral legislation; the Liberal Party gave contracts to agencies that, in return, fattened the coffers of the Liberal Party. This is the Liberal Party's dirty illegal money scandal.

What is the Prime Minister waiting for to keep his word, fulfill his promise and put the Liberal Party's dirty money into a trust fund today?

Sponsorship ProgramOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Kings—Hants Nova Scotia

Liberal

Scott Brison LiberalMinister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, there have also been allegations that the Parti Québécois, the provincial sister party of the separatists, has received funds inappropriately and that the receipt of those funds helped influence the direction of contracts to companies as a result.

Because of those allegations, I would urge that we not consider those allegations as fact and in fairness to the Parti Québécois, the separatists and all people who are implicated unfairly by some of these allegations, that we wait for the Gomery report. That would be the right thing to do.

Sponsorship ProgramOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Bloc Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is clear that, with such an attitude, the Liberals will lose their confidence vote on May 18.

We have learned that a Liberal Party of Canada supporter, a certain Thalie Tremblay, videotaped spots promoting Liberal MPs on community television. Contrary to what you might expect, she was not paid by the Liberal Party of Canada, but rather by Public Works and Government Services Canada, with Groupaction acting as the intermediary.

Is this not one more example of dirty, illegal, Liberal money—

Sponsorship ProgramOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Minister of Public Works and Government Services.

Sponsorship ProgramOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Kings—Hants Nova Scotia

Liberal

Scott Brison LiberalMinister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, once again, the party has been clear: if it has received inappropriate funds, it will reimburse the taxpayers.

What is also clear is that there have been allegations against the Parti Québécois and it has not been really as forthright as the Prime Minister.

There should be an inquiry into the Parti Québécois. There should be an inquiry into the activities of the separatists. If the Bloc is interested in the truth, it should be supporting the Prime Minister and doing the same thing in its own house.

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

David Anderson Conservative Cypress Hills—Grasslands, SK

Mr. Speaker, things are never as they seem with the government. As we heard this morning, scandal permeates it.

We have heard this week that Maurice Strong, the Prime Minister's financial benefactor and mentor, has been tied to the oil for food scandal, but he is not the only one. The Canadian Wheat Board is a government agency. It illegally arranged sales to the same program through one of its accredited exporters and 30% of the value of that sale disappeared.

Why did the government allow its agencies to participate illegally in this oil for food debacle?

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the government is ready to answer with regard to the Wheat Board and the other allegations. It seems the Conservatives have a hard time focusing their minds. I do not exactly know what is going on with the research bureau on that side of the House.

In the case of the oil for food program, I would like to draw to the attention of the House that this is a matter for the United Nations. It is being investigated at this very time and we will of course watch to see exactly what the inquiry will do. The opposition seems to be quite keen to jump on any kind of allegation, even an international one, if it can--

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Cypress Hills--Grasslands.

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

David Anderson Conservative Cypress Hills—Grasslands, SK

Mr. Speaker, this directly affects Canadians because 30% of the value of the contract disappeared through shipping delays and what are referred to as transfers to other buyers, whatever they are. That sounds like even more corruption. Huge losses on corrupt contracts would be a real surprise around here.

How did the Wheat Board and its exporters manage to lose $8 million out of a $23 million illegal deal with Iraq?

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Winnipeg South Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock LiberalPresident of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, if I understand the member correctly, if he is alleging that the farmer-led board of the Canadian Wheat Board has engaged in corrupt practices, he might want to step outside of the chamber and make that claim so it can respond appropriately.

HealthOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Don Boudria Liberal Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, last year the Minister of Health said, “Canada cannot be the drugstore for the United States”.

Now that the United States Congress is threatening to allow re-imports of pharmaceutical products from Canada back to the U.S., thereby threatening our supply and making us into a drugstore, what will the government do to stop this?

HealthOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Vancouver South B.C.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the fact is that Canada cannot be the drugstore for the United States of America, particularly with respect to the controlled prices for domestic purposes. We have developed all of the options. There has been a comprehensive analysis of all of the options. I will be taking those options to cabinet in the very near future, so that we can move on these things.

JusticeOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Myron Thompson Conservative Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, as revealed in a recent W-Five program, there are 15,000 Canadians serving conditional sentences. When W-Five asked to speak about house arrest with the justice minister, it was told it was a matter that was under study. What is new? And that he was too busy with other issues like same sex marriage and the decriminalization of marijuana.

Since these serious crimes, like killing and raping, do not warrant jail time, has jail time simply become unfashionable for the Liberal government?

JusticeOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Northumberland—Quinte West Ontario

Liberal

Paul MacKlin LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, clearly, since conditional sentences were introduced in 1996, they have become a very important part of our sentencing regime. There are examples that get media attention that maybe do not get fully reported and in fact give conditional sentences a bad name. However, they are a vital part of our sentencing. We are looking at those areas which have caused concern to see if there should be improvements made.

JusticeOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Myron Thompson Conservative Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, the victims in this country have already given it a bad name. Since so many Liberals might be going to jail in the near future, is house arrest in order for them? Or will they actually go to jail for stealing Canadian money?

JusticeOral Question Period

Noon

Northumberland—Quinte West Ontario

Liberal

Paul MacKlin LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, with respect to conditional sentences, I just mentioned that they are a vital part of our sentencing regime. At the recent federal, provincial and territorial first ministers meeting with justice ministers, this matter was discussed. They have set up a special committee and will be reporting back to this House in June.

Sponsorship ProgramOral Question Period

Noon

Bloc

Jean-Yves Roy Bloc Matapédia—Matane, QC

Mr. Speaker, Benoît Corbeil, the former director general of the Liberal Party, said, “There is no doubt that Quebec electoral law was broken—in my opinion—was broken and even made a mockery of. It is clear that money played a significant role although not a major role in the referendum. If it had not been for these secret resources, I am not sure they would have won the referendum”.

Will the Prime Minister admit, in light of the evidence, that the dirty money was used not only in three elections, but also in the referendum and that the Liberals are getting ready to—