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House of Commons Hansard #17 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was quebec.

Topics

Carrefour Jeunesse-Emploi des MoulinsStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Bloc Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Carrefour Jeunesse-Emploi des Moulins youth employment centre, in my riding of Terrebonne—Blainville, is celebrating this year its 10th anniversary. The youth policy and support concept it represents was a great initiative of the Parti Québécois.

In addition to the 10 years of operation of this organization, we want to acknowledge the outstanding work of its founding president and chief executive officer, Diane Hamelin.

Over the years, this kind-hearted, tenacious, enthusiastic and dynamic woman has shown leadership, surrounding herself with the professional team she needed to meet the objectives of this organization, which is an important player in our community when it comes to ensuring the social and professional integration of young adults.

Diane, on behalf of the Bloc Québécois, myself and the people of Terrebonne—Blainville, I say, “Well done!”. The 16-35 generation in our area thanks you.

Child CareStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Liberal Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, last November the NDP sold out to the Conservatives and now that strategy has cost Canada a national child care program. Yesterday's child care debate proves it.

After the throne speech, the NDP was “cautiously optimistic”, and the NDP House leader had the gall to state, “We are making progress”. Now the NDP is surprised that the Conservative budget keeps the Conservative promise to kill child care.

Amazingly, in NDP land the members continue to attack the Liberal opposition and give the Conservatives a free pass. The NDP told Canadians last election, “Lend us your vote just this one time”. That is a mistake Canadians will not make twice.

AgricultureStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Bev Shipley Conservative Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise in the House today to emphasize the significance of agriculture to this great country of Canada.

For the first time in many years, our agriculture producers have a government that listened and then took action on a financial crisis that the previous government created and then failed to do anything about. Farmers are now represented by a government that will reinvest in the second largest industry in this country to the extent of $1.5 billion in additional funds.

I am proud to be a member of a government that keeps its promises. I commend the Minister of Finance, the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and the Prime Minister for listening and taking action in such a positive way.

This is a great budget for farmers. It has proven that the government is committed to agriculture and will provide real investment in a real time of need.

The BudgetStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Liberal Beauséjour, NB

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative budget has failed several groups in my riding and across Atlantic Canada.

The government's silence on improvements to EI for seasonal workers is a serious source of concern. The Conservatives are just looking at reducing EI premiums at the expense of those working in seasonal industries. The two-week qualifying period for benefits should be eliminated, because the expenditures of low-income families cannot wait two weeks. Fishers need money to fix their wharves, and this budget is offering them little hope.

The words “official languages” do not get to see the light of day in this budget. The francophone communities in my riding need the support of the federal government to build on their economic, social and cultural progress of recent years.

Reducing the taxes of the wealthiest will not solve all problems.

Laurent Pauzé-DupuisStatements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Bloc

Claude DeBellefeuille Bloc Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, today I would like to honour the passing of a student from Hemmingford in Montérégie. Laurent Pauzé-Dupuis died on April 3 in Peking, China.

Laurent was 22 years old. Together with 1,300 other university students from all over the world, he was participating in a simulation of international debates using UN conferences as a model.

A student at McGill University in Montreal, Laurent was participating in the World Model United Nations 2006 as a representative of the Institut des sciences politiques de Paris.

Perhaps you may have seen him in the hallways of Parliament, as he was hired as a guide last year.

On behalf of the people of the riding of Beauharnois—Salaberry, I would like to offer my sincere condolences to his parents, Laurent and Michèle, his sister Gabrielle, and his partner Yumiko.

AgricultureOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Liberal Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, until the budget, farmers thought they might get as much as $2 billion more this spring in emergency assistance but the Conservative MP for Battlefords—Lloydminster says that he does not see any sense in making a big payment to farmers. He says that pockets are not deep enough in Ottawa for such a program.

The government inherited the biggest surplus in Canadian history. Why were farmers misled to think they might get more cash this spring?

AgricultureOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Calgary Southeast Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, my colleague opposite is absolutely wrong. After 13 years of Liberal inaction on agriculture and after a farm crisis developed under its management, this government's first act was to deliver immediately a major cash injection of $700 million.

In the budget we have added an additional $1.5 billion for the family farms of Canada that the Liberal Party neglected.

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

May 5th, 2006 / 11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Liberal Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, what he counts is last year's money and maybe next year's money but nothing this spring.

Until February, the books of the Government of Canada carried specific allocations to fully implement the Kelowna accords for aboriginal people: $1.8 billion for education, $1.6 billion for housing and water, $1.3 billion for health, $170 million for governance, $200 million for economic development, more than $5 billion altogether until February.

With the biggest surplus in Canadian history, why did the government gut 90% of the funding for aboriginal people?

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Calgary Southeast Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the real question is why, after 13 years in power, did the member, when he was finance minister, his party and his government fail to act for aboriginal Canadians? Why is it that they waited until the 11th hour and 59th minute to put together a press release in Kelowna rather than delivering for aboriginal Canadians, as we have in the budget, with an additional $450 million over two years?

That is why the head of the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples said, “We're very pleased with the budget.... We see this as a down payment on the Kelowna agreement”.

Child CareOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Liberal Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, every mainstream aboriginal organization in the country says that the government is wrong.

After the Liberals first balanced the country's books, we increased federal support for families and children by close to $10 billion per year. We had the child tax credit, the child benefit supplement, child care expense deduction, parental leave and the list goes on.

In last Tuesday's budget, the Conservatives cut $1 billion from the Liberal package, slashing the young child supplement. With the biggest federal surplus ever, why did the government cut support to the most vulnerable families?

Child CareOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Calgary Southeast Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the opposite is true. The government in the budget has provided more financial support for Canadian families with kids than we have ever seen in a modern Canadian budget, including one point off the GST that will save Canadian families over $5 billion, including $1,200 per year per child under six, money that the Liberal Party will vote against in the budget.

We have provided money for kids' sports, for textbooks and for schools because this government puts families first rather than Liberal special interests.

HealthOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Brown Liberal Oakville, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am sorry to report that there is no new money in the budget to achieve the government's guarantee of shorter wait times for health care services despite the recent throne speech that made the guarantee.

The provinces have already said that they cannot attain the Conservative guarantee without new money. How does the Minister of Health expect to keep his promises to Canadians when he failed to get the necessary funds into this year's budget?

HealthOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement ConservativeMinister of Health and Minister for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario

Mr. Speaker, what I can report to the House is that the budget of this government has added a further 6%, $1.1 billion, in transfer payments to the provinces. Next year there will be another $1.2 billion.

Of the $41 billion of the new deal for health care, fully $5.5 billion will reduce wait times in Canada. We are part of that solution. The government stands four-square with the provinces and territories to deal with the issue that was left hanging by the previous Liberal government because it talked a lot about wait times but it did nothing.

HealthOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Brown Liberal Oakville, ON

Mr. Speaker, the money of which the minister speaks is the money that we promised in the 10 year health plan. It is not new money. This is simply carrying forward previously allocated money.

Considering that we left the largest surplus in the history of the country to the new government, why can we not find one new dollar for the Conservative health care guarantee?

HealthOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement ConservativeMinister of Health and Minister for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario

Mr. Speaker, as I explained to the House, there is an additional investment in wait time reductions. We have followed through on our promises, which are consistent with our promises in the campaign.

If I were dining on Liberal promises, I would be wasting away right now. They do not count for anything, and the people of Canada have seen a true government that deals with its promises to the people of Canada for the benefit of Canadians.

UNESCOOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Bloc Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, on December 19, 2005, in the middle of the election campaign, the Prime Minister made the following promise: “...we will invite Québec to participate in UNESCO according to the model for the Francophonie Summit”. This morning we learn that all Quebec will get is a spot within the Canadian delegation to UNESCO and the right to be consulted before Canada takes a position.

How can the government explain backing off from the promises it made in December?

UNESCOOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Calgary Southeast Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the hon. member for her question. This gives me the opportunity to point out that the Prime Minister is currently in Quebec city with the Premier of Quebec to announce an historic agreement to give Quebec a voice on the world stage. In 13 years of power, the Liberals never did that.

Our Prime Minister promised to give Quebec a voice on the world stage. Today he has kept his word.

UNESCOOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Bloc Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, in terms of UNESCO and other international organizations, Quebec asked for the possibility to give its consent before Canada takes a public position on areas under Quebec's jurisdiction.

Are we to understand that in the event Quebec and Canada do not share the same position Canada will never defend a position that is contrary to the one Quebec is defending?

UNESCOOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Calgary Southeast Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, today's historic agreement shows that the current federal government can work with Quebec's federalist government. The Bloc and the separatists do not want that. They do not want this federation to succeed.

Today, thanks to this agreement on Quebec's role at UNESCO, the Prime Minister is showing the Conservative government's good faith and proving that he keeps his word and honours his commitments toward Quebec's international role.

UNESCOOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Bloc Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, during the last election campaign, the Prime Minister made a commitment, and I quote, “to enable the provinces to extend their jurisdictions on the international scene”.

Does this mean that the government is committed to giving Quebec the power to negotiate and conclude international agreement in matters that fall within its jurisdiction?

UNESCOOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Calgary Southeast Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, it is clear that this government respects provincial jurisdictions. This government is creating an open, flexible federalism.

Today, the Prime Minister is in Quebec to sign an agreement with Quebec's federalist government. He wants to cooperate and work with all of the provinces, including Quebec, that have concerns about their voice on the international scene. Today, the Prime Minister has kept his word, and he will continue to keep his promises.

UNESCOOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Bloc Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, in a statement he made last December, the Prime Minister clearly recognized the international extension of Quebec's jurisdiction.

Is the Prime Minister prepared to formally commit to making no decisions on behalf of Quebec when negotiating or signing a treaty concerning a matter that falls within the province's jurisdiction unless Quebec gives him formal authorization to do so?

UNESCOOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Calgary Southeast Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the agreement signed in Quebec this morning is clear on all of these issues. This agreement is the result of talks between the federal government and the Government of Quebec. Quebec wanted a voice on the international stage, specifically in UNESCO. That is why we will continue to work with the Quebec delegation to UNESCO to ensure that we can work together. That is open federalism.

JusticeOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Jack Layton NDP Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, something important was missing from yesterday's announcement concerning crime. For years, the NDP has been asking the government to take action against payday lenders. Such companies exploit the weaknesses of poor people and low-income workers. They charge fees that can add up to 15,000% annually.

The Liberals did nothing. Will the Conservatives make the changes needed to protect citizens from this usurious practice?

JusticeOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Calgary Southeast Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we are going to consider the matter raised by the hon. leader of the NDP. This government will always act to protect the best interests of Canadian consumers and taxpayers.