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House of Commons Hansard #162 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was adoption.

Topics

The EconomyOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Ken Epp Conservative Edmonton—Sherwood Park, AB

Mr. Speaker, last week the Certified General Accountants Association of Canada warned that Canada's standard of living is at risk because of lagging productivity. What was one of the reasons it cited for this drop in productivity? The Liberal sponsorship scandal and a lack of accountability in government.

Will the Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board share what this government has done to bring accountability and transparency back to Ottawa?

The EconomyOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, on page 26 the report shows the Liberal ad scam weakened productivity. It states, “In addition to the loss of millions of taxpayer dollars, the federal government also lost a considerable amount of approval”.

However, keep the hope alive, Mr. Speaker. The report goes on to say, “...there has been a resilient change of culture in the federal government regarding transparency and accountability”. It is like a ray of sunshine at the end of a long, cloudy day.

Rail TransportationOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Alex Atamanenko NDP British Columbia Southern Interior, BC

Mr. Speaker, the quality of rail service in western Canada is deteriorating at a time when both CP and CN are making record profits. Zellstoff Celgar Pulp Mill in Castlegar is paying premium prices for rail service that is getting progressively worse.

The first step to improve rail service would be to have a quick resolution to the ongoing CP strike, a resolution that is fair to both sides. It is not right that a company making record profits should be asking for a sweetheart deal from workers.

Will the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities force CP Rail back to the bargaining table and tell it to negotiate a fair settlement for the workers?

Rail TransportationOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Jonquière—Alma Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn ConservativeMinister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, the right to strike is recognized by the Canada Labour Code. However, I believe that all members will agree that settlements are reached when both parties come to the table to agree on the renewal of the work contract. Our mediator continues to support both parties in this endeavour.

Rail TransportationOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Alex Atamanenko NDP British Columbia Southern Interior, BC

Mr. Speaker, we need a firm commitment from the government to improve rail service in Canada. Our credibility as an exporting nation is at stake, as is the survival of many rural communities. If Celgar cannot ensure reliable and efficient delivery of its product, over 400 employees could be thrown out of work.

It is the duty of the government to act. Will the minister tell CP to be fair, not only to its workers, but also to stop gouging businesses that rely on rail transport?

Rail TransportationOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Jonquière—Alma Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn ConservativeMinister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, we know the importance of these two railway operators, Canadian National and Canadian Pacific, CP Rail. Once again, I can only encourage the parties to come to the table with the support of our mediator, who is trained to truly help the parties reach an agreement. It is at the table that the solution will be found.

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Liberal Bramalea—Gore—Malton, ON

Mr. Speaker, since 2006, the refusal rate for temporary residence visas has been too high. This means many Canadian families are unable to have their relatives or friends from overseas attend funerals and weddings.

The government shows no compassion when it denies a daughter in India the chance to go to her father's funeral in Canada.

When will the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration take real action to improve the application process for temporary residence visas?

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Souris—Moose Mountain Saskatchewan

Conservative

Ed Komarnicki ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, obviously we would not get into the specifics of any particular case, but I can say that the minister does use her discretion, whenever she is able, in a proper way.

We always look at issues of security and importance to the Canadian society. Whenever we can, we are generous and compassionate.

JusticeOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Gary Goodyear Conservative Cambridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians elected our party because they wanted a government that would finally get tough on crime.

Despite all parties making such promises in the last election, it is only this party that is keeping those promises. Our approach is meant to be tough but balanced. It respects the rights of the accused, but does not allow those rights to take precedence over the community's rights to be safe.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada say how Bill C-9, the conditional sentencing bill, will help make our communities safer?

JusticeOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Fundy Royal New Brunswick

Conservative

Rob Moore ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for all of his work on making Canada a safer place.

Despite Liberal efforts to gut the bill, Bill C-9 has received royal assent and comes into effect six months from now. On that day, criminals who commit serious personal injury offences will no longer get a Liberal get out of jail free card to serve their sentences in the comfort of their own homes. Instead, they will receive a Conservative go directly to jail card.

Canada's new government does not play games with violent criminals. We are committed to making our streets and communities safer and, as the Minister of Justice said, we are just getting started.

Democratic ReformOral Questions

Noon

NDP

Paul Dewar NDP Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, on democratic reform, the government keeps undermining a good idea by using cheap branding tricks.

Recently the Minister for Democratic Reform shamelessly used student interns as a backdrop for an announcement on electoral reform. Now this week in the House of Commons debate he used a third party validator, Apathy Is Boring, without its consent.

Did the minister have the permission of Apathy Is Boring to use it as a validator for his bill on electoral reform, yes or no?

Democratic ReformOral Questions

Noon

York—Simcoe Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan ConservativeLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I was simply reading from a public statement that it made. If it is in the public realm and posted on its website, that is entirely acceptable.

The bottom line, and the most important part, is it said that it was a good bill, that it would enhance voter turnout and encourage more young people to vote. That is a good thing for democracy and for Canada.

Wage Earner Protection Program ActPoints of OrderOral Questions

Noon

Bloc

Monique Guay Bloc Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I ask for the unanimous consent of this House to adopt the following motion:

That the government's notice of ways and means motion No. 13, tabled in the House by the Minister of Labour on December 8, 2006, be deemed adopted and that the bill listed on the order paper under “Introduction of Government Bills” and entitled “An Act to amend the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act, the Companies' Creditors Arrangement Act, the Wage Earner Protection Program Act and chapter 47 of the Statutes of Canada, 2005” be deemed to have been introduced in the House, deemed to have been read the first time and printed, deemed to have been read the second time and referred to a committee of the whole, deemed considered in committee of the whole, deemed reported with the following amendment:

“That clause 32 of the bill be replaced by the following:

Paragraphs 67(1)(b) to (b.3) of the same statute, as enacted by subsection 57(1) of Chapter 47 of the Statutes of Canada 2005, are replaced by the following:

(b)any property that as against the bankrupt is exempt from execution or seizure under any laws applicable in the province within which the property is situated and within which the bankrupt resides;

(b.1) goods and services tax credit payments that are made in prescribed circumstances to the bankrupt and that are not property referred to in paragraph (a) or (b);

(b.2) prescribed payments relating to the essential needs of an individual that are made in prescribed circumstances to the bankrupt and that are not property referred to in paragraph (a) or (b);

(b.3) without restricting the generality of paragraph (b), property in a registered retirement savings plan or a registered retirement income fund, as those expressions are defined in the Income Tax Act, or in any prescribed plan, other than property contributed to any such plan or fund in the 12 months before the date of bankruptcy”,

deemed concurred in at the report stage as amended, and deemed read the third time and passed”.

Wage Earner Protection Program ActPoints of OrderOral Questions

Noon

York—Simcoe Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan ConservativeLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, before we go further on this, while this does sound like we may be heading toward progress and while it does sound optimistic, I do not believe we have had an opportunity to consider all that was said. A lot of it was technical languages, and certainly we would deny unanimous consent until we have an opportunity to do that.

I think it would be in the interest of all the parties to sit down and achieve that unanimous consent.

Wage Earner Protection Program ActPoints of OrderOral Questions

Noon

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

I take it there is no consent then, from that statement.

Standing Committee on Official Languages—Speaker's RulingPrivilegeOral Questions

June 1st, 2007 / noon

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

On May 15, the hon. Leader of the Opposition raised a question of privilege concerning the circumstances surrounding the inability of the Standing Committee on Official Languages to elect a new chair. I wish to thank the hon. Leader of the Opposition for raising this matter, as well as the numerous other members who made interventions.

I took the matter under advisement and undertook to return to the House.

The Chair needs hardly to remind the House that, as House of Commons Procedure and Practice, page 128, states:

Speakers have consistently ruled that, except in the most extreme situations, they will only hear questions of privilege arising from committee proceedings upon presentation of a report from the committee which directly deals with the matter and not as a question of privilege raised by an individual Member.

That said, I understand the impasse has been resolved. The Standing Committee on Official Languages met yesterday, elected a chair and has taken up its business.

Accordingly, since the situation has been addressed in the best traditions of this place, that is through negotiations among the parties and action taken in the committee itself, I believe there is no need for further comment or intervention from the Chair.

I thank all hon. members who contributed to this felicitous outcome.

Government Response to PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to four petitions.

Criminal CodeRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Conservative

Greg Thompson Conservative New Brunswick Southwest, NB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-59, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (unauthorized recording of a movie).

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

First Nations Land Management ActRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Conservative York—Simcoe, ON

moved that Bill S-6, An Act to amend the First Nations Land Management Act, be read the first time.

(Motion agreed to and bill read the first time)

Canadian ForcesPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Liberal Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, I am presenting a petition signed by over 600 petitioners.

As a result of recent events relating to friendly fire incidents in Afghanistan and because of the nature of these unfortunate incidents, the integrity, professionalism and reputation of members of the Canadian Forces has been called into question.

The petitioners call upon the Minister of National Defence and the Prime Minister to take immediate action to ensure that members of our Canadian Forces be given the full respect they deserve, that they are not treated as common criminals and that all efforts be made by the Canadian government to protect the reputation, livelihoods and mental health of those individuals when such incidents occur.

Old Age Security ActPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

NDP

Bill Siksay NDP Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to table two petitions signed by almost 500 Canadians.

The petitioners call upon the government to amend the Old Age Security Act to eliminate the 10 year residency requirement for OAS and guaranteed income supplement, to work with provincial governments to waive the enforcement of financial support in situations of genuine immigration sponsorship breakdown involving a senior, to establish a nominal public transit charge for all seniors in Canada and to provide government funding for more affordable housing for seniors who are members of specific ethnic communities.

The petitioners note that uniting seniors with their families through immigration is a core aspect of forming strong, healthy and vibrant communities in Canada. They believe these measures would greatly assist in meeting those goals.

Firearms RegistryPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Conservative

Maurice Vellacott Conservative Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

Mr. Speaker, I have over time a number of constituents write in about an important issue to them. These constituents from the communities in my riding of Martensville, Osler, Hague, Langham, Warman, Blaine Lake and other parts of my riding call upon Parliament to end the registration requirement, in particular for the non-restricted long guns. They would like that to happen sooner rather than later.

Status of WomenPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Conservative

Rick Dykstra Conservative St. Catharines, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to table a petition signed by over 100 of my constituents, drawing attention to the alarming level of violence against indigenous women and girls. The petitioners urge the Canadian government and Parliament to condemn this violence and work toward a solution.

Foreign AffairsPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Conservative

James Rajotte Conservative Edmonton—Leduc, AB

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to present a petition today on behalf of hundreds of members of my constituency and Canadians across the country with respect to their concerns about the human rights situation in the Philippines.

Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, the following question will be answered today: No. 193.