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House of Commons Hansard #67 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was code.

Topics

Oil and Gas IndustryOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan NDP Edmonton Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, the National Energy Board just announced a limited Arctic-only review of offshore oil and gas drilling. It has also denied adequate public funding to ensure the promised effective participation.

On June 2, all parties, including the Conservative Party, agreed to our motion to have a comprehensive public review of environment and safety regulations for all unconventional sources of oil and gas. This NEB review falls pathetically short.

When will the Conservative government live up to its promises?

Oil and Gas IndustryOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis ConservativeMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, in Canada we have a sound and solid regulatory system, which is led by the National Energy Board.

I was proud to see last month that we are going to review the regulations surrounding all the projects in the Arctic. The review will take into consideration what happened in the Gulf of Mexico so that we can better understand how we can improve our strong, solid regulations. This is action.

Oil and Gas IndustryOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan NDP Edmonton Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, the government clearly just does not get it.

The point of the review was also to study risks from the oil sands development. As compelling evidence reveals major risks to the water, to the fishery, and to aboriginal health, applications to expand the oil sands are proceeding.

When will the government assert its powers to address the serious risks posed by unconventional oil and gas?

Oil and Gas IndustryOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis ConservativeMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, we have a strong and solid regime with stringent rules for water, soil, and air.

A lot of regulation is in place and is being applied by the National Energy Board. As I just stated, they are reviewing the entire process and the regulations. Down the road, no project will go forward until the safety of the workers and the protection of the environment is assured.

It is sad to see people fearmongering about a critical organization like the NEB.

Securities IndustryOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Daniel Paillé Bloc Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, in a letter dated September 29, 2008, the Premier of Quebec called upon the Government of Canada to fully respect Quebec's jurisdiction over securities.

In Calgary last week, the Minister of Finance, the hostile predator of jurisdictions, said that the absence of a national securities regulator was an embarrassment for Canada.

What is so embarrassing about respecting jurisdictions? What is so embarrassing about respecting Quebec's jurisdictions?

Securities IndustryOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty ConservativeMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, we have respected regional jurisdictions in that regard. It is a voluntary system, a voluntary initiative. Canada is the only industrialized nation in the world that does not have a national securities regulator.

Securities IndustryOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Daniel Paillé Bloc Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, since September 2008, another important issue has been added to the already long list given by the Premier of Quebec, and that is Ottawa's refusal to compensate Quebec for harmonizing the QST and GST. Quebec is being unfairly deprived of $2.2 billion.

Under the Conservatives, can Quebec expect all finance-related requests, no matter how legitimate they may be, to be ignored and forgotten?

Securities IndustryOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty ConservativeMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, we need a fully harmonized system.

The issue is simply this: There needs to be true harmonization of the two tax systems, the two consumption taxes, and that has not yet been accomplished. We have had discussions with Quebec. The discussions have continued between officials, and I hope that over time they are successful.

Harmonization is harmonization. Harmonization is not something else.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Liberal Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, it took a very persistent veterans ombudsman to show the government that it was not practising what it preached, despite wrapping itself in a cloak of virtue about our men and women of the armed forces.

I am a proud ex-naval officer, and I know that actions speak louder than words. I have a very simple question. Will the government make its new policy retroactive to 2006 so that it will not leave behind the wounded veterans of the last four years?

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn ConservativeMinister of Veterans Affairs and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, I would like to remind the member that we made an important announcement on Sunday: we will invest $2 billion, $200 million over five years, to protect our modern-day veterans who return from Afghanistan with serious injuries. We will increase the permanent monthly allowance by $1,000 per month. Those on a lower salary scale will receive a minimum salary of $40,000 once they have participated in a rehabilitation program. Our government is stepping up to help our veterans.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Liberal Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister does not want to renew Pat Stogran's mandate because he was passionate about defending veterans' interests.

Yet our soldiers who return with injured bodies and minds have made the greatest sacrifice a country can ask of its citizens. We owe them the utmost respect. Lip service is not enough.

Did the government really get the message? What will it do about lump sum payments that do not meet people's needs?

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn ConservativeMinister of Veterans Affairs and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, I want to say that we appreciate the work that the veterans' ombudsman has done to date. We are also in the process of selecting a new person to be the veterans' ombudsman. Our government created this position. Anyone who would like to know more can visit our website.

On Sunday, we announced three important measures to help our modern-day veterans in particular. We will soon be making more announcements. We are currently reviewing the lump sum payment issue, among other things, and we intend to make improvements.

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

September 21st, 2010 / 2:55 p.m.

NDP

Jean Crowder NDP Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, first nations are rallying on Parliament Hill and across Canada demanding fair funding for schools in their communities. On-reserve schools are making do with up to one-third less funding than provincial schools. The result is a crisis, including a dropout rate three times higher. The education gap is not only stunting economic opportunities for these children, but harming their communities as well.

Why does the government have billions for corporate tax cuts, but little or nothing for first nations children? When will the government start properly funding first nations education?

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Vancouver Island North B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan ConservativeMinister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, this government understands the importance of education and that is why we are committed to improving it in partnership with first nations and the provinces and territories.

Since 2006, our government has invested $400 million in the completion of nearly 100 school projects. Additionally, our economic action plan and building Canada program provided for 18 additional schools and major renovations.

We are working closely with B.C., Alberta, Manitoba, P.E.I. and New Brunswick and regional first nations on initiatives to improve educational outcomes. It is our priority.

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Jean Crowder NDP Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, since taking power, the Conservatives have a shameful history when it comes to first nations education.

Here are some facts. This spring they dithered on whether to support First Nations University, putting the students in limbo for months. The long-promised review of post-secondary supports is still missing in action. Four years later B.C. first nations are still waiting for their agreement on education to actually get funded.

Could the minister please explain his government's failure on first nations education and what it actually plans to do about it?

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Vancouver Island North B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan ConservativeMinister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, we launched two new programs in 2008, the education partnerships and first nations student access. These will help first nation students. Most of this is new money. The moneys we put in place through the economic action plan is also achieving major positive results for first nation education.

The EconomyOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Mike Wallace Conservative Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government is focused on the economy, on jobs and implementing Canada's action plan. The plan is working, creating jobs and promoting growth.

The Liberal Party, however, is out of touch. It talks down Canada's economy and the economic action plan at every opportunity. For Liberals, the only solution is higher and higher taxes.

Could the Minister of Finance please tell us what is wrong with the Liberal plan?

The EconomyOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty ConservativeMinister of Finance

I would be happy to, Mr. Speaker. Our priority is helping Canadian families, helping Canadian communities and preserving Canadian jobs. That is why we are continuing to implement the successful economic action plan. Canada has created over 430,000 net new jobs since the recession ended.

The Liberals are proposing tax hikes that would wreck our economy. It would kill about 400,000 jobs, according to the experts.

The choice is clear: a Conservative government that creates jobs or a coalition government that will kill jobs.

AgricultureOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Liberal Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, many western farmers are facing financial ruin due to severe weather. However, government programs are proving to be useless.

Linda Oliver from Mozart, Saskatchewan, states, “We have had over 1000mm of rain here - over 40 inches - and all I am told is [the government] are monitoring the situation....Agri recovery won't even pay on clover - seeded last year...but drowned out. Is that fair?”

When will the minister and the current government actually help farm families who are in severe financial stress?

AgricultureOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Battlefords—Lloydminster Saskatchewan

Conservative

Gerry Ritz ConservativeMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, we have done exactly that. Working with the farm groups, the affected provinces and territories, we have come forward with the largest, fastest delivered program ever in the history of the country. We have delivered money to top up crop insurance. That is the first line of defence in a situation like that. Agristability will pay out large dollars this year since we are into a new five-year average, losing 2004 the frost year. Therefore, we are looking forward to getting that money flowing to farmers very quickly.

We know we have done a good job because farm groups are telling us and I would be happy to quote some of them back to the member.

Border CrossingsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Claude DeBellefeuille Bloc Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, we constantly have to reassure our American neighbours that Canada has rigorous security measures in order to protect the economy and trade, and now the Conservative government has decided to close two border crossings, one in Franklin Centre and another in Jamieson's Line, both of which are in my riding, and to reduce the hours at three other crossings.

Does the government realize that cutting border services will harm tourism, trade, the economy and local life?

Border CrossingsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Provencher Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews ConservativeMinister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, we examine these issues very carefully and we ensure that the money being spent on border crossings is appropriately done. I know CBSA has made certain recommendations and I believe those recommendations are consistent with both the interests of Canadians who access those border crossings as well as continuing to stimulate trade across the border with the Americans.

CensusOral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Brian Masse NDP Windsor West, ON

Mr. Speaker, clearly the current government believes it is better to make decisions without the facts. On the census, Conservatives are happy to put reason aside, ignore schools, municipalities and hospitals and forge ahead. This simply is irresponsible and is going to cost more money to the taxpayers.

We have learned that over 90% of all correspondence the Conservatives have received is opposed to their changes. Almost all are from individual Canadians, not academics or other elites who make them scared.

When will the minister listen to Canadians and reinstate Canada's long form census?

CensusOral Questions

3 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement ConservativeMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, it probably should not surprise me, but it still does, to hear how quickly and easily members of the opposition, including the NDP, are approving of jail time or large fines for their fellow Canadians who refuse, out of good conscience, to fill out a 40-page questionnaire with very personal information. It is incredible how they will sacrifice the rights of Canadians on this matter.

We on this side have a balanced proposal that gets usable useful data for those who want it and at the same time protects the rights of Canadians. We are proud to make that balance.

Firearms RegistryOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Bernard Généreux Conservative Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, everyone knows that criminals do not use registered long guns to commit their crimes. We all know that. They use illegal, unregistered guns.

Yet, the Liberal Party and the Bloc Québécois insist on criminalizing honest Canadian and Quebec hunters and farmers.

Could the Minister of Natural Resources explain the government's intentions regarding the long gun registry?