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House of Commons Hansard #142 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was immigration.

Topics

Transportation of Nuclear WasteOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis ConservativeMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, as my colleague knows, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission is responsible for this sector. It is the independent regulator that makes decisions in such cases. That is what happened. A decision was made by a panel of independent experts after they heard from 77 different intervenors.

Transportation of Nuclear WasteOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Paule Brunelle Bloc Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, a preliminary environmental assessment is even more important given that the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission president has indicated that this shipment of nuclear waste is but the first in a series of shipments that could be made on the St. Lawrence.

Will the Minister of Natural Resources ensure that Ontario's nuclear waste does not travel through Quebec, at least until an environmental assessment is carried out?

Transportation of Nuclear WasteOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis ConservativeMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, an independent commission, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, is responsible for implementing the regulations. It is an independent regulator made up of independent experts. This commission made a decision based on 77 presentations. Three public hearings were held. I also asked the commission to be proactive and provide technical briefings to anyone interested. Therefore, if there are legal challenges, they will be heard by the courts, which will do what they have to do.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Bloc Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, while a new study shows that the ice cap in the far north is melting because of climate change, researchers from Sherbrooke are getting ready to dismantle the PEARL atmospheric observatory in Nunavut. These researchers are still waiting to find out whether funding for the Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences will be renewed.

What is the government waiting for to confirm that funding for climate change research will be renewed?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Thornhill Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent ConservativeMinister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the hon. member for his question. I can only tell him to be patient and wait until the budget is brought down on March 22.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Bloc Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, instead of wasting $1 million distributing weather alert equipment to our schools for the sake of raising its profile, the federal government should instead be renewing funding for the Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences and ensuring that the PEARL atmospheric observatory can continue its work.

Instead of handing out useless gadgets, why does the federal government not provide better funding to scientific research into climate change?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Thornhill Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent ConservativeMinister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the program funded by the National Search and Rescue Secretariat to send weather radio receivers to schools and guide and scout camps, was created following the devastating tornadoes that hit southern Ontario in 2008.

The weather radio receiver allows school authorities to be instantly alerted when severe weather threatens. Weather radio is the only system like this in Canada. Why does the Bloc take issue with school children having—

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Kings Hants.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Scott Brison Liberal Kings—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, after they spent Canada into a record $56 billion deficit, the Conservatives still refuse to come clean on the cost of their failed U.S.-style prison bills.

The Parliamentary Budget Officer has been clear. He said that the government has not provided the finance committee with the information.

When will the Conservatives stop hiding the truth from Canadians? Why are they treating Parliament and the Canadian taxpayer with such contempt?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Provencher Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews ConservativeMinister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, while we are speaking on the issue of prisons, the other week I was in Newfoundland and Labrador.

The Liberal MPs asked us to build a new prison in Newfoundland and Labrador. At the same time, the Liberal leader was saying we should not build prisons. I am wondering whether the Liberals could get together on that particular issue and figure out where they stand in respect of criminal justice issues. Why do they not want to see dangerous criminals locked up and ordinary Canadians safe on the streets?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Scott Brison Liberal Kings—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, it is very clear that the Conservative regime would rather hire more prison guards than hire more front-line nurses.

The Conservatives will not tell Parliament how many billions their prison bills will cost. Why will the finance minister not come clean with the costs? Is it that he has not done his homework and does not know the real costs of his U.S.-style megaprison agenda, or is he cooking the books to hide the true deficit numbers, just like he did in Ontario?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Provencher Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews ConservativeMinister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, we know one thing for certain and that is that the Liberals do not support our prison guards in our prisons.

The Liberals have consistently come out on the side of the prisoner. When the public safety critic from the Liberal Party goes into a prison, he comes out wondering about the morale of the prisoners. He never once stops to talk about victims, or about the prison guards who are doing a great job keeping Canadians safe.

National DefenceOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Liberal Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives refuse to come clean with Canadian taxpayers.

They are basically telling us that they are going to purchase aircraft but that they are not going to tell us how much those aircraft cost. They are refusing to hold a competitive bidding process to ensure that the Canadian Forces get the best aircraft for the best price. They are also carrying out a costly propaganda campaign with ministers and generals to try to justify their bad decision. We all know that the actual cost has doubled since the program began.

Why are they hiding the truth from us?

National DefenceOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Central Nova Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay ConservativeMinister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, that is completely untrue.

We have committed $9 billion for the acquisition of 65 aircraft. These are the same aircraft that the party opposite committed to back in 1997.

This $9 billion is committed not only for the cost of the 65 aircraft, but also the associated weapons system, supporting infrastructure, initial spares, training simulators, contingency funds and project operating costs.

This is funded through the Canada first defence strategy. This is an excellent aircraft for the best air force in the world.

National DefenceOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Liberal Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, when Canadians buy a car, they look at several models and choose the best model for their needs. Then they go to more than one dealership to see which one will give them the best price. That is how they get the best deal.

Apparently wiser than the minister, most Canadians also know that it is worth bargaining before buying the car. If the car dealer knows the purchaser has several options, he will try harder to win his or her business with the best deal possible.

It is the same thing with jets. What does the government not understand about the value of holding a competition before making the most expensive purchase in Canadian history?

National DefenceOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Central Nova Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay ConservativeMinister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, there was a competition and it happened on the watch of the Liberal Party.

The F-35 is by far the best fifth generation aircraft, and in fact, the only fifth generation aircraft available.

We will not endanger the lives of Canadian pilots. We will not endanger the sovereignty of our country. We will proceed with this project. It is important that we give the best air force the best equipment at the best price and not delay, as we saw with the EH-101 project.

I hear the member for Wascana bawling and braying like a baby donkey with its head stuck in a fence. He is upset because he is in opposition. He had better get used to it.

JusticeOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Scott Armstrong Conservative Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley, NS

Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to making our communities and streets safer by getting tough on crime.

In recent weeks three important pieces of legislation have passed in the Senate and now await royal assent.

Could the Minister of Justice please update the House on the importance of these pieces of legislation?

JusticeOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Niagara Falls Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson ConservativeMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to say that in the last two weeks we have passed three bills. We will get rid of the faint hope clause ensuring that those who decide to commit murder will serve at least 25 years in prison. In addition, we are ending the sentencing discount for multiple murders. Finally, we have passed our important bill to better protect children from online sexual exploitation.

There are a lot more bills before Parliament. I call on the coalition to get its act together and start supporting victims and law-abiding Canadians.

SportsOral Questions

March 9th, 2011 / 2:45 p.m.

NDP

Glenn Thibeault NDP Sudbury, ON

Mr. Speaker, this country was stunned silent last night as we witnessed yet another shattering on-ice head shot. Max Pacioretty joins a long list of athletes who will soon know the devastating effects of a concussion.

Traumatic brain injuries are not just affecting NHL players. They are also affecting amateur athletes and our children. The game is faster. The equipment is harder. Strategies are needed to protect young Canadian athletes.

Will the government support our bill to reduce concussions and serious injuries in amateur sports?

SportsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Saanich—Gulf Islands B.C.

Conservative

Gary Lunn ConservativeMinister of State (Sport)

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for his question and his serious interest. This is a serious issue, something we have taken very seriously.

We have spoken with national sports organizations. I am working with the Minister of Health on strategies of bringing them together. It is something that we are concerned about.

Obviously, I saw the same hit the member did last night in an NHL hockey game. It is something we hope that the NHL also takes very seriously. That type of hitting is unacceptable.

SportsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair NDP Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister must understand that a helmet protects the skull and not the brain. Doctors, sports associations and experts agree that we are experiencing nothing less than an epidemic of concussions and spinal injuries.

How many other cases like that of Max Pacioretty do we need to see? How many more young players must be seriously injured? What will it take for him to act? We have a Minister of State for Sport, but what is he being paid to do?

For a year now, the NDP has been proposing concrete solutions. What is the government waiting for to take action?

SportsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Saanich—Gulf Islands B.C.

Conservative

Gary Lunn ConservativeMinister of State (Sport)

Mr. Speaker, first of all, yes, we are fully engaged with national sports organizations. We have some that are actually doing a very good job. We continue to work with them and continue to do the research. I am working with the Minister of Health on strategies in how we can bring about greater awareness.

At the end of the day, we have to work with the experts. I understand this raises the issue about helmets. We have to ensure that we have raised awareness.

I was deeply concerned at what we saw in the NHL game last night. I saw the hockey player out cold on the ice as well. Again, we will do everything to ensure that the NHL does not allow this kind of action to continue.

SecuritiesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Daniel Paillé Bloc Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, the proposed merger of the London and Toronto stock exchanges has raised concerns in Quebec and Ontario among small and medium-size businesses and big banks alike. Quebec, the Autorité des marchés financiers and other provincial agencies all want to have a say, particularly concerning the repercussions of this potential transaction.

Can the minister responsible for examining this transaction calm the waters and promise that he will not make any decision until Quebec and the Autorité des marchés financiers have made their decision?

SecuritiesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement ConservativeMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I had discussions with the Quebec and Ontario finance ministers. I told them it was important to have information and input from Ontario and Quebec before any decision is made at the federal level. They said that that was possible.

SecuritiesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Daniel Paillé Bloc Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, this issue is just further proof that Quebec needs to preserve its Autorité des marchés financiers and its jurisdictions. If the securities commission the Conservatives want were in place, Quebec would not have any say at all. The Alberta Court of Appeal rejects the Conservative plan. It found that it would be a federal intrusion into provincial jurisdictions.

Will the Minister of Finance consider the fact that the appeal court in the home province of the Prime Minister and the Minister of State for Finance issued a final ruling? Will the government finally abandon its predatory, centralist project, which basically only Toronto supports?