House of Commons Hansard #226 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-49.

Topics

Transportation Modernization ActGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Conservative Bruce Stanton

We are going to resume debate with the hon. member for Yorkton—Melville, but I will let her know that we will need to interrupt her shortly before two o'clock for the usual Statements by Members. She will having the remaining time when the House gets back to debate on the motion that is before the House.

Transportation Modernization ActGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

Conservative

Cathay Wagantall Conservative Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today and speak to Bill C-49, the transportation modernization act. This bill would amend a number of different bills, I believe 13 in fact, with many significant changes being more than just technical in nature. My focus will be on the issues around grain transportation as this portion of the bill is of great concern to those who farm in my riding of Yorkton—Melville and ship their products from Saskatchewan to multiple destinations by rail.

I look at this omnibus bill and wonder what the rationale was for creating such complex legislation. It could have been more effective on many levels to split Bill C-49 into rail shipping, rail safety, air, and marine to target consultation to expedite the best legislation for each. My colleague, representing Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek and the transport shadow minister, put forward such a motion in response to the Liberal member for Niagara Centre, who raised the idea of expediting the passage of this bill in order to provide grain farmers a greater amount of certainty as they negotiate contracts for future shipping seasons. It is telling that the member did not have the support of his Liberal transport minister or his colleagues, as the Liberal vote was unanimously against splitting the bill.

The Minister of Transport's silence and inaction on critical and time-sensitive transport issues over the past two years, especially on rail transport, has fuelled uncertainty with both shippers and the railroads as they negotiate shipping rates for the coming season. The previous Conservative government introduced Bill C-30, which gave the Canadian Transport Agency the power to allow shippers access to regulated interswitching up to 160 kilometres, mandated that CN and CP both haul at least 500 tonnes of grain per week, and introduced a new definition for adequate and suitable service levels. With this extension, the number of primary grain elevators with access to more than one railroad with the extended interswitching limits increased from 48 to 261. These measures were met with universal support from the shipping community because, even if shippers did not use interswitching, they could use it as a tool to increase their negotiating position with the railways, as the shippers knew exactly how much the interswitch portion of the haul would cost them. At the same time, the former Conservative government had announced that the Canada Transport Act statutory review would be expedited. It began a year early in order to provide long-term solutions to the grain backlog of the 2013-14 shipping season and other problems in the transport sector within Canada.

Transportation Modernization ActGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Conservative Bruce Stanton

The hon. member for Yorkton—Melville will have seven minutes remaining in her time when the House next gets back to debate on the question.

October 1970Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Bloc

Rhéal Fortin Bloc Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, When Justice meets chaos
in unheated homes
at five in the morning

When government reasoning ignites
at five in the morning

Some became wounded
at five in the morning
Some became chilled
at five in the morning

That is what Gérald Godin wrote on the eve of the October Crisis, on October 16, 1970, when Pierre Elliott Trudeau invoked the War Measures Act and had 500 innocent people arrested in front of their families, people like Gérald Godin, a humanist if ever there was one, the epitome of an open and modern Quebec, people like the great Pauline Julien and Gaston Miron. Can you imagine? That would be like putting Leonard Cohen in jail. There was also Michel Chartrand, ultimate champion of social justice, who was put in jail for four months. That too is what Canada 150 means to Quebec. Those 500 people were arrested without grounds for daring to love their people enough to make it known. I remember October 1970.

We Scare HungerStatements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Filomena Tassi Liberal Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize St. Thomas More Catholic Secondary School, in my riding, for the We Scare Hunger campaign. We Scare Hunger is an amazing initiative. Students from St. Thomas More, as well as students from across the city, will be collecting canned goods tonight for the local Neighbour to Neighbour food bank.

We Scare Hunger is an initiative that started over 18 years ago with 20 students from St. Thomas More, and now it has grown into one of the largest initiatives led by students in the country. Tonight, more than 850 students from St. Thomas More alone will be out knocking on doors to help those most in need. This year's ambitious goal is 100,000 pounds of canned goods.

I wish to congratulate the students and staff at STM, as well as the high schools across my ambitious city of Hamilton, as they carry out this fantastic initiative. I believe that STM will reach its goal of raising 100,000 pounds of canned goods tonight and will indeed scare hunger.

Go, Knights, go.

The ReformationStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Arnold Viersen Conservative Peace River—Westlock, AB

Mr. Speaker, mass literacy and the separation of church and state are both products of the great reformation. In fact, it is impossible to understand modern history without an understanding of the impact of the reformation.

Five hundred years ago today, a young man named Martin Luther nailed 95 theses to the church door in Wittenberg, Germany. This set off a series of events that changed the spiritual, theological, and political trajectory of the western world. Critical to the reformation was the conviction that nothing could compel an individual to violate his or her conscience.

Central to the reformation are the Five Solas of salvation: Sola Scriptura, by scripture alone; Sola Fide, by faith alone; Sola Gratia, by grace alone; Solus Christus, by Christ alone; and Soli Deo Gloria, to the glory of God alone. Sola Scriptura led to the improvement of literacy rates, which came from the idea that everyone should be able to read the Bible. It resulted in the translation of the Bible into nearly every language around the globe.

Today we commemorate 500 years of reformation and proclaim, Soli Deo Gloria.

HalloweenStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Robert-Falcon Ouellette Liberal Winnipeg Centre, MB

[Member spoke in Cree as follows:]

Niwakomacuntik Tansai Nemeaytane Awapamtikok.

[English]

Mr. Speaker, some politicians have skeletons, others bodies. Today is a very special, scary day. Today is Halloween, but it is also the birthday of my son Jacob Joseph Ouellette. He is 11 years old today. I miss Jacob very much and love him also. I am very sorry that I am often absent, but his mother and I are always thinking of him. I ask that he please continue working hard, smiling, helping others, keeping a positive attitude, and giving everything he has to the task at hand. He should remember that we love him and also his brothers and sisters: Xavier Gabriel, Edouard Real, Julien James, and Abigaelle Rose.

I also congratulate the people who have made Winnipeg a safe place in our inner city to trick or treat on Halloween. Organizations like Ma Mawi, AYO, and Meet Me at the Bell Tower have made an incredible difference in our inner city. Thanks to Michael Champagne, Chris Clacio, Grace Scott, Samuel Trout, Mark Wright, Mary Jane Daniels, Fred Flett, Shirley Bear, Wayne Roberts, and Chickadee Richard. They are our heroes. They are Winnipeg.

[Member spoke in Cree]

HealthStatements By Members

2 p.m.

NDP

Alistair MacGregor NDP Cowichan—Malahat—Langford, BC

Mr. Speaker, in early September, my wife was admitted to hospital due to significant and serious concerns with her pregnancy. For the next six weeks, the hospital became a second home to our family. This was a difficult and scary time, but we made it through because of the dedication, love, and compassion shown by the entire staff of the hospital: the doctors, the nurses, and of course, the lovely people who brought in the meals.

Therefore, I stand here to express my personal and everlasting gratitude to the men and women who helped our family. I do not think any of us can quite truly appreciate the national treasure we have that is our public health care system until we need it. Because of this system and the people who worked so hard to care for my wife, my family was able to celebrate and welcome the birth of our baby girl, Isla, two weeks ago.

Religious FreedomStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Chandra Arya Liberal Nepean, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to talk about Bill 62, which was recently passed in the Quebec legislature. We know that diversity is one of our country's greatest strengths. Unfortunately, too often we are forced to repeat this statement. I share concerns such as those highlighted in the Ottawa Citizen by Suzanne Doerge and Fathiya Warsame, of the City for all Women Initiative. We need to ensure that all rules across the whole country unite Canadians instead of creating an “us” and a “them”.

As the Prime Minister has said on numerous occasions, we do not believe that the government should be telling people what they can and cannot wear. Canadians rightfully expect that their government will take the necessary steps within its power to ensure that everyone's rights are protected under the charter.

Community Builders Volunteer AwardsStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Rachael Harder Conservative Lethbridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, 2017 marks a significant milestone for Canada. This year we celebrated our 150th anniversary since Confederation. What better way to commemorate this occasion than to recognize the amazing contributions made to our country by outstanding Canadians who give their time, talent, and resources to positively impact others and make our nation great?

The Community Builders Volunteer awards were created to recognize and celebrate the many volunteers in the Lethbridge riding who go above and beyond to give back. On October 20, I had the honour of recognizing and celebrating 18 amazing individuals, not-for-profit organizations, and businesses for their remarkable contributions to our community. The place I call home would not be the same without these individuals.

Today, in the House of Commons, I take this moment to formally recognize and honour those women and men of my riding who were granted a Community Builders Volunteer award.

Infrastructure Projects in the OutaouaisStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Steven MacKinnon Liberal Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, over the past few days I have had the pleasure of announcing two exciting projects for Gatineau. First, we are going to begin re-cladding the Terrasses de la Chaudière complex, which is a group of federal government buildings where the largest contingent of Canada's public servants work. Together with my colleague from Hull—Aylmer, we are taking this opportunity to revitalize public spaces inside and outside the complex for our community and for the 6,000 public servants who work there every day.

This morning, I also announced the construction of a second complex for the Library and Archives Canada Preservation Centre, a $400-million project that will create good jobs and preserve Canada's historic treasures. The federal government is working to ensure its presence in Quebec and the Outaouais.

Jean Nicolet Elementary SchoolStatements By Members

October 31st, 2017 / 2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Emmanuel Dubourg Liberal Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, there are some initiatives that deserve to be commended. For the second year in a row, I had the immense pleasure of swearing in the grade 6 student council at Jean Nicolet elementary school in Montreal North. In an exercise led by their teacher, Ms. Kerline François, 20 students campaigned for seven councillor positions. During their well-run campaign, they worked to sway voters while learning about the democratic process and group management. This inspiring initiative also gives the students a chance to get involved in school activities. I therefore wish these aspiring leaders every success in government, and I also commend the administration at this school in my riding of Bourassa, which has been running this exercise every year for eight years.

100th International Plowing MatchStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Ben Lobb Conservative Huron—Bruce, ON

Mr. Speaker, the highlight this fall in Huron—Bruce was found in Walton, Ontario, which played host to 76,000 people for the 100th International Plowing Match. I thank Jack Ryan, Joe Ryan, and the entire Ryan family and their surrounding neighbours, who made it such a great venue.

I congratulate Jacquie Bishop on being named the first female chair of the plowing match in that 100-year history. I thank the thousands of volunteers, sponsors, and exhibitors, the musical entertainment, and the talent of Huron East and the surrounding municipalities. Special thanks go to the plowing association. What a fantastic, great event.

We are proud of our rural roots in Huron—Bruce and southwestern Ontario. This was a fantastic plowing match, and I want to sincerely thank all the people involved. What a tremendous show we put on.

Women's History MonthStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Kamal Khera Liberal Brampton West, ON

Mr. Speaker, as we conclude Women's History Month, let us pay tribute to the trail-blazing women who have shaped our country and our way of life. Today I would like to highlight some of the organizations in Brampton West, and the women behind them, that bring positive change to the women in our community.

The Lady Ballers Camp is an organization that develops girl-centred programs that encourage physical, emotional, and educational development. Led by Toyo Ajibolade, this camp has touched the lives of hundreds of young girls.

Hope 24/7 is an organization that assists victims of sexual and domestic violence. Laura Zilney, the CEO of Hope 27/7, has been a tireless advocate in her pursuit of ensuring that these essential services are available to all women who are in need.

I want to encourage young women across Canada to follow in the footsteps of these inspiring women and claim their place.

Student VolunteersStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Serré Liberal Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, congratulations to students for taking action against poverty. The students at Confederation Secondary School in Val Caron have come together to collect funds to provide food, clothing, laundry services, and public transit for their peers. They surpassed their goal in one night by collecting over $3,900, which is truly amazing.

Champlain Catholic high school held a “Homeless for a Night” event that raised $5,270 for the Chelmsford food bank. For the 17th year in a row, the students of Franco-Cité Catholic high school held a Thanksgiving fundraiser, and this year a total of 20,000 pounds of food was donated to the West Nipissing food bank.

All people deserve to have fresh food on the table and clothing on their backs.

I want to thank the faculty and parents for supporting these students' efforts.

I thank all staff, parents, and students for caring for their community.

UkraineStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

James Bezan Conservative Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman, MB

Mr. Speaker, today we welcome the Prime Minister of Ukraine, Volodymyr Groysman, to Canada. This being his first visit to Canada, Prime Minister Groysman will be meeting with policy-makers and business leaders to discuss and improve upon existing projects and new partnerships between Canada and Ukraine.

Our previous Conservative government initiated many economic, diplomatic, and security agreements, to the benefit of both our nations. The strong historical and cultural links between Ukraine and Canada were strengthened by Conservative initiatives such as the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement, the bilateral defence co-operation agreement, and more than $100 million in aid to promote economic growth, democracy, and humanitarian assistance.

Canada still has much to offer Ukraine. Conservatives have called on the government to restore Radarsat imagery, to add Ukraine to the Automatic Firearms Country Control List, and to provide it with the lethal defensive equipment it has requested. We continue to call on the Liberals to work with Prime Minister Groysman to continue Canada's legacy of unequivocal support for Ukraine.

UkraineStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Borys Wrzesnewskyj Liberal Etobicoke Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, this past August 24, Canadian soldiers marched in Ukraine's Independence Day parade carrying the Canadian flag in downtown Kyiv, which was a clear message to Ukrainians that Canada and NATO stand with them during this time of Russian military invasion and daily aggression.

The liberal democratic west faces a global hybrid war against our foundational values and a rules-based international order. Ukraine's largely volunteer army is in the hot conflict in the Donbas fighting Kremlin soldiers and proxies. Defending Ukraine's territorial integrity, these brave soldiers are a living shield for NATO and the west. Through Operation Unifier, Canada has trained 5,500 Ukrainian soldiers. Let us make sure that these brave men and women are properly trained and equipped to deter further aggression.

Today on the Hill we welcome Prime Minister Volodymyr Groysman, and we extend to him a heartfelt greeting of Slava Ukraini i Slava Kanadi.

Human RightsStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Daniel Blaikie NDP Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, I rise today in solidarity with the Oromo people who are being persecuted by their own government in Ethiopia. Popular protests began in earnest against the government's master plan in November 2015. The plan seeks to dispossess Oromo people of their land in order to expand Ethiopia's capital city, Addis Ababa. The plan followed on the heels of a number of development projects that had already displaced many Oromo farmers over the past decade.

The government has disregarded the Oromo people's right to peaceful assembly, using brutal force against its own people to quell protests across Oromia. The number of arbitrary arrests and untimely deaths continues to rise for Oromia's farmers, opposition politicians, academics, journalists, and students, among others.

I urge the Canadian government to respond to this situation, voice Canada's concerns about the Oromo people in Ethiopia, and work with our allies in the international community to create consequences for the Ethiopian government's violation of its citizens' human rights.

TaxationStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Alex Nuttall Conservative Barrie—Springwater—Oro-Medonte, ON

Mr. Speaker, over the past few weeks it has come to our attention that the Liberal government has been unfairly raising taxes on Canadians suffering from diabetes. I now hear reports that the government is also targeting Canadians with mental illness.

Living with disease or disability is not easy. The government should not be making it even more difficult by forcing these Canadians to pay even more to deal with or treat their various conditions.

As the shadow minister for youth, sports, and persons with disabilities, I want to make it absolutely clear to those suffering from disease or disabilities that the Conservative Party is listening to them and we are fighting on their behalf. We will not let the government turn its back on them. We will not be silent. We will stand beside them and with them to undo these injustices.

Women's History MonthStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Terry Duguid Liberal Winnipeg South, MB

Mr. Speaker, this year's celebrations for Women's History Month have once again underscored the immense contribution of women and girls throughout our country's history. Each day this month stories were shared of trail-blazing women and girls who embodied the spirit of this year's theme, #ClaimYourPlace.

Their stories sparked a dialogue and inspired Canadians to get actively involved. On October 11, we celebrated the International Day of the Girl, reaffirming our role as a leader in the fight for girls' rights and gender equality around the world.

One week later, we honoured Persons Day and the five women who fought tirelessly to have women legally recognized as persons in Canada.

As Women's History Month draws to a close, let us channel this powerful momentum and rededicate our efforts to empowering women and girls here in Canada and around the world.

EthicsOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, we know that the Minister of Finance secretly held his Morneau Shepell shares in a numbered company for two years. He also introduced legislation on pensions that would benefit him personally. A former House of Commons law clerk stated that his conduct was, and I quote, a “huge error of judgment”.

Does the Prime Minister agree?

EthicsOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, as members and ministers are almost always required to do, the Minister of Finance worked with the Ethics Commissioner to ensure that he was following all the rules and laws. He also put in place a screen to ensure he did not make decisions where he was in a conflict of interest, a step also taken by a former leader of the opposition, former minister Denis Lebel, and many people on both sides of the House who entered into similar arrangements.

EthicsOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, a former law clerk of the House of Commons is astounded that the finance minister thought he was complying with the spirit of the Conflict of Interest Act by holding assets through numbered companies and that, at the same time that he was introducing pension legislation, he owned a company whose business is pensions. The former law clerk says that the finance minister “should've known better”. We agree completely. Does the Prime Minister?

EthicsOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, everyone in the House works with the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner to ensure that their personal dispositions are in line with the rules in place. I can assure everyone that the finance minister followed that advice, and I am absolutely certain that the leader of the official opposition also followed the advice of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner in accordance to his own personal tax dispositions.

EthicsOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the key difference here is that I disclosed everything to the Ethics Commissioner and the finance minister did not.

This is not a backbencher we are talking about. We are talking about the Minister of Finance, one of the government's most prominent ministers.

When did the Prime Minister find out that the Minister of Finance was in conflict of interest?