House of Commons Hansard #93 of the 44th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was guns.

Topics

Criminal CodeGovernment Orders

1:45 p.m.

NDP

Rachel Blaney NDP North Island—Powell River, BC

Madam Speaker, today, I will be sharing my time with the member for Saanich—Gulf Islands.

Before I start my speech, I want to acknowledge that today is June 21, National Indigenous Peoples Day. It is a day that I recognize with a lot of love because of my beautiful granny. She went to residential school in Lejac between the ages of four and 16, and her strength and integrity keep our family strong. I also want to acknowledge my Auntie Dean from Stellat’en First Nation. Her traditional name is Hatix-Ka’wah, which means peace within the frame of a house. Because of the day, I wanted to acknowledge her as the lead of our family before I started.

I am here specifically to speak to Bill C-21, an act to amend certain acts and to make certain consequential amendments in regard to firearms. I want to start by thanking the member for Cowichan—Malahat—Langford for his hard work on this file. It is not an easy one, and these discussions are always rife with conflict as we try to navigate our way around this issue. I will say that I am ready to support this bill getting to committee. I also recognize that I still have a lot of questions, and I am hoping the committee will be able to work through some of those questions to get me answers.

I represent a rural riding. I grew up in a household where several of my family members were legal gun owners. They followed the rules, and I was taught gun safety at a very young age as a matter of respect. I grew up eating wild meat, and hunting was a significant part of my family's life.

I have met with many legal gun owners in my riding who have talked about the frustration they feel about the rules always focusing on them, rather than addressing some of their legitimate concerns about illegal guns and how they get into our communities. That is an important part of our conversation today, and it should continue to be. Those conversations do concern me greatly. My riding also has a high level of people retiring from the military who maintain their skills as a commitment to their years of service. It is important for us all to recognize those who use firearms to protect and serve our communities.

I have also heard from constituents who are very, very concerned about gun violence in their communities and in our region. There have been, sadly, several examples in my riding over the past few years, which has resulted in my office receiving more concerns about gun safety than we have ever seen before. This is especially concerning when it comes to cases of domestic violence where guns are used. In 2020, 160 women and girls were killed in Canada. One woman or girl is killed every two and a half days in this country. Therefore, as Canadians are seeing an increase in gun violence across our country, I believe that all Canadians do want to see this addressed.

About three years ago, a constituent in my riding invited me to come to the shooting range with him. He wanted to showcase this for me, so I would understand the rules and how he followed them. I agreed so that I could learn more about the realities of these folks living in my region. Of course, he was also a retired service member for the military, and I always take an opportunity to spend time with people who served us, and who served us so well.

The first thing he told me was that I would have to come to his house and ride with him because he could not stop on the way through town to pick me up. The rules in Canada meant that he had to go straight from his home, not stopping for anything else, and go to the range. At his home, he was able to show me the way he stored his guns separate from ammunition, with everything locked away and secured. He also showed me how he transported the guns and how that was done safely.

I learned a lot, and I really appreciated his effort to take that time to educate me. He also shared that he was concerned about the gun violence in Canada and what that did for him as a legal gun owner and as somebody who was really practising safely. He knew of things that had happened across the country, and he knew that people were more fearful.

These are important conversations to have, especially at that community level where we can have those open conversations and discussions about how we can come together. My constituent did feel that the majority of gun owners followed the rules very carefully, but he was also concerned that there are legal gun owners who do not always follow the rules, and he wanted to make sure that those issues were addressed. Of course, he was also very concerned about the fact that we do have illegal guns in this country, and those folks can really make a bad name for people who are doing their best to be safe.

The facts are that, in Canada between 2019 and 2020, there were notable increases in rates of firearm-related violent crimes being reported, especially in places like southern rural British Columbia, which had an increase of 34%; the northern rural part of Ontario, which increased by 32%; rural Alberta, which increased by 32% in the north and 31% in the south; the Northwest Territories, which saw a 23% increase; and Nova Scotia, which increased by 22%. Handguns were the most serious weapon present in most firearm-related violent crimes.

Over my seven years here, I have heard two things repeatedly from constituents: one is that we need to look at gun policy in Canada, focussing on illegal guns and how they get to our country; and two is that we need more education in Canada about the strong rules that we do have and how they work. I believe these are important areas to discuss.

I have also heard a lot on this bill specifically about concerns from the airsoft community that Bill C-21 would prohibit imports, exports, sales and transfers of all replica firearms, which would include airsoft guns that are designed or intended to look exactly like or resemble a real firearm.

This does concern me, because there is the safety issue on the one side that we should consider carefully. We have heard stories of people using these to emulate real guns, and that is a safety concern for all people who are involved in that situation. We also hear the other side, and that it will impact paintball retailers and facilities, as most rely on income from both airsoft and paintball use.

I understand that in this country there are very few regulations, and I think it is something we need to look at. We have heard from this sector that they have not been meaningfully consulted. We want to make sure that when we further the discussions, we could address that.

I have learned that people have successfully altered airsoft weapons to hold real ammunition, and this really surprised me. I had no idea that that was even possible. Unfortunately it is, and it is a growing concern. We need to work with this sector to make sure that we look at the realities they are facing, and make sure the solution is workable, so they can continue their practice and not have a huge impact on their income. However, we also need to make sure the safety of Canadians is addressed.

Illegal guns are a huge concern for my constituents, as I mentioned earlier. This bill does not offer what I would like to see on measures for gun smuggling. I represent 19 Wing Comox. Its crews do tremendous work on our coastline to keep our community safe. They have found people trying to ship things illegally across our borders, whether it be guns or drugs, and they have stopped that. I really appreciate their work, but I am concerned there is not going to be the amount of support needed to continue that work and to expand that work.

We know that this bill would increase the maximum penalty for trafficking, smuggling and other firearms offences from 10 years to 14 years. It would require the commissioner of firearms to give the minister an annual report. It would allow proactive information sharing between the RCMP and local law enforcement agencies for the purpose of investigating or prosecuting firearm trafficking offences, and it would also provide eligibility for wiretapping on additional Criminal Code firearms offences.

What it does not include in a meaningful way is more support for the Canadian Border Services Agency. We know that, under the previous Conservative government, over 1,000 positions were cut. Under the Liberal government, some of those folks are back, but definitely not the number that is required to actually address the guns that are being smuggled into our country illegally.

We also know, as our leader wrote to the Prime Minister in 2018, that we need to see more changes within our policies in this country to support the root causes of gun violence in some of the more vulnerable communities. We need to address things such as poverty. I was at an event just a few days ago in my community, and I was very surprised by how many people talked to me about the increasing homeless population. They spoke of how more and more people are really struggling to make ends meet and how often they are going towards violence because they cannot feed themselves. They are not safe in their own area.

We need to make sure there are supports provided to our communities to address these key issues because the more poverty grows, and the more people are disenfranchised, the more violence is the result. We need to look at these things as correlating numbers.

I am here to discuss this. I hope that all of us in the House can have a meaningful conversation, because these things are important to our communities, and if we do not address them in an open and transparent way, it will lead to more conflict.

Criminal CodeGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Sean Casey Liberal Charlottetown, PE

Madam Speaker, I was particularly interested in my colleague's comments on airsoft guns and the impact on that industry. It is an issue in my riding. I believe this is absolutely a good bill, but with airsoft guns, quite frankly, it overreaches. The problem is this: An airsoft gun that is a replica of a gun that is not banned would be banned, so we would be banning toys.

Does my hon. colleague have any concerns about that? Does she feel this is something that could be addressed through amendments at committee?

Criminal CodeGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

NDP

Rachel Blaney NDP North Island—Powell River, BC

Madam Speaker, I have spent a lot of time with the member in committee, and I always appreciate his feedback and his thoughts. In this case, I completely agree with him. These are very important questions because we know there are a lot of industries that use airsoft, and it is a toy. It is something people play with, but if it is used in the wrong hands, either changed so it can actually shoot or used to replicate something else, that is concerning.

We have to look to our committee to do the work to make sure we offer a workable solution, so we would not only be protecting the industry but also making sure we are keeping our communities safe at the same time. That is why it is so important that we come together on the bill and have meaningful dialogue. It is because these are life-and-death situations, in some cases, both in terms of economics and in terms of safety.

Italian Heritage MonthStatements by Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Majid Jowhari Liberal Richmond Hill, ON

Madam Speaker, during the beautiful month of June, there is a lot to celebrate. The sun is shining, the ice cream trucks are back and there are numerous cultural heritage months to acknowledge, but in my riding of Richmond Hill there is one occasion we are especially excited to celebrate.

June marks Italian Heritage Month, a time to commemorate all of the contributions of our neighbours, friends and fellow community members of Italian descent. I am proud to represent a riding that is made more vibrant and inclusive thanks to community-led organizations such as the Golden Age Italian Social Club, the Richmond Hill Social & Bocce Club, and the Richmond Hill Italian Community Club, all of which work to connect and engage seniors.

To all Italian Canadians in my community and across Canada, I wish them a happy Italian Heritage Month, and if this happens to be the last time I speak in the House before the session ends, to all my constituents in Richmond Hill, I wish them a most pleasant and healthy summer.

UkraineStatements by Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Conservative Oxford, ON

Madam Speaker, for the last two months, several members' offices, including mine, have had the opportunity to have Ukrainian interns working with us as part of the Canada-Ukraine parliamentary internship program. During this time, we have had the chance to gain insights as to what is happening on the ground and in the everyday lives of the Ukrainian people. I am proud to say that Canada stands with Ukraine, and it is vital that we continue to provide our support through our welcoming of refugees and our military aid to those in Ukraine.

Every day, we learn about atrocities being committed in Ukraine. The brave young women and men of Ukraine, including those who have been with us on the Hill, need the continued support of Canada so they may be the leaders, doctors, lawyers, professors and artists of Ukraine's future.

Victory for Ukraine is victory for democracy. I urge all Canadians to continue to stand with the Ukrainian people, and I would like to commend the brave young women of the internship, who have been tremendous advocates for their country. I wish them my continued support as many of them head back to Ukraine at the end of this month.

Slava Ukraini.

Canada Summer Jobs ProgramStatements by Members

June 21st, 2022 / 2 p.m.

Liberal

Pam Damoff Liberal Oakville North—Burlington, ON

Madam Speaker, each year businesses and not-for-profits in my riding of Oakville North—Burlington look forward to participating in the Canada summer jobs program.

This program provides them the opportunity to create employment opportunities for young people 15 to 30 years of age. Since I was elected, I have worked hard to grow this program in our riding. This year, 71 businesses and not-for-profits in my riding are creating over 400 jobs for youth in our community in a variety of fields, ranging from sports and recreation to computer sciences and more. These positions will provide not only meaningful work experience for young adults, but also a much-needed boost for small businesses and not-for-profits still recovering from the effects of the pandemic.

I look forward to spending time in my riding this summer visiting some of these organizations, meeting with the youth and employers, and learning more about the impact being made in our community.

National Indigenous Peoples DayStatements by Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Marilène Gill Bloc Manicouagan, QC

Madam Speaker, I am proud to rise on this 21st day of June to honour National Indigenous Peoples Day.

May this, the brightest day of the year, serve as an opportunity to showcase the full spectrum and richness of indigenous language and culture. On this special day, let us become better acquainted with and learn about the diversity and wealth that offer so many pathways to a greater understanding of each other through theatre, knowledge, music, craft, literature, tradition and visual art.

May this day to celebrate the robust identities of indigenous peoples foster respect, dialogue and equality among nations. Today, Quebec as a whole salutes indigenous peoples' heritage and contributions going back thousands of years. They have left their mark on our land and on our existence through the centuries and do so to this day.

On behalf of the Bloc Québécois, I want to thank my brothers and sisters of the Abenaki, Algonquin, Atikamekw, Cree, Maliseet, Mi'kmaq, Huron-Wendat, Mohawk, Inuit and, of course, Innu and Naskapi nations for glowing so brightly and generously sharing their light with us.

High School Graduates in OrléansStatements by Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Marie-France Lalonde Liberal Orléans, ON

Madam Speaker, this week marks the beginning of graduation for our grade 12 students, and I want to take a moment to congratulate the 1,745 graduates from Orléans’s 10 high schools.

This year, I am pleased to be attending several grade 12 graduation ceremonies in Orléans. It will be an opportunity to once again celebrate the students' accomplishments with their friends and family.

I cannot express enough how, in the past two years, I have witnessed their strength, resilience and community spirit.

It is always a great honour for me to personally sign the diplomas of each of our graduates every year and to wish them well in the future. They have accomplished so much and are now starting a new chapter in their lives.

No matter what path they decide to take, now that they have completed high school, I know they have enough tools and supports to achieve anything they put their minds to.

Congratulations to all graduates of 2022.

Westman FarmersStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Larry Maguire Conservative Brandon—Souris, MB

Madam Speaker, I rise to pay tribute to Westman’s farmers and ranchers. Despite the challenges Mother Nature has thrown at them, they press on each day. A Colorado low hit in late spring that hurt the livestock producers as calves were being born. A constant barrage of rain delayed seeding and turned fields into mud. A late frost bit canola and other crops just as they were peeking out of the ground, and now flea beetles are running amok. Somehow, our farmers pushed through. They persevered. They are out there as we speak, producing the food on which the world relies.

As the illegal Russian invasion of Ukraine continues, many are worried about the price and quantity of food in the year to come. Our farmers can help. Now more than ever, we need them to succeed.

I salute all those men and women working around the clock doing what they do best: growing and raising the food we eat every single day.

National Sickle Cell Awareness DayStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Darren Fisher Liberal Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Madam Speaker, over the weekend we celebrated National Sickle Cell Awareness Day in Canada, and today I am rising in honour of those affected by sickle cell disease and to honour the incredible organizations and volunteers who work so hard to support people living with it.

When I first joined Senator Jane Cordy and sponsored Bill S-211, the National Sickle Cell Awareness Day Act, I had the honour of really getting to know the incredible advocacy organizations across Canada. Groups like the Sickle Cell Disease Association of Atlantic Canada, the Sickle Cell Association of Ontario and the Sickle Cell Disease Association of Canada were doing everything they could to raise awareness. They knew that with greater awareness come more support, more research, better treatments and possible cures for this disease.

I am so thankful for the privilege to work with the sickle cell community, and I ask everyone in this House to please rise and join me in honouring those who live with sickle cell disease and the incredible organizations across Canada that support them.

Netivot HaTorah GraduatesStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Ya'ara Saks Liberal York Centre, ON

Madam Speaker, the last two years have been hard for many Canadians. As a mother, like many parents, I have had concerns about how my two daughters, among millions of kids across this country, have navigated their studies, their social connections and their emotional well-being. Our educators in schools large and small, from day care through high school, have nurtured and cared for our children, making sure they received not only the educational tools and resources they needed, but emotional and resilient support while navigating the challenges they faced.

This June has brought with it graduations from coast to coast to coast for students and the resumption of grad trips, which are part of the milestones of exploring our wonderful country.

Today, I and colleagues from across this House welcomed Netivot HaTorah middle school graduates to West Block to see and learn how their House and the democratic institutions we cherish work, and that the diversity of this place reflects our Canada.

As a mother, it is not every day that I get to welcome my kid into this place. I congratulate the graduates, including my daughter, Eden. Their future is bright and we are proud of all they have accomplished and all they will do in their future.

Yasher koach.

Edward Alvin OdishawStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Kerry-Lynne Findlay Conservative South Surrey—White Rock, BC

Madam Speaker, on June 3, Conservatives lost a truly remarkable and long-time activist, Ed Odishaw, at age 86.

Edward Alvin Odishaw was born and raised in North Battleford, earning his law degree from the University of Saskatchewan. In 1973, he moved to Vancouver, where he practised corporate law with Swinton & Company and then Boughton Law.

As a friend of my older brother, Greg Findlay, I first met Ed when I was a teenager.

From the age of 26, he spent five years as executive assistant to Premier Ross Thatcher. Later, his love of politics flourished within the Conservative Party. He first served the leader of the official opposition, John Reynolds, and then proudly worked with Prime Minister Harper. He mentored me and so many.

Ed was eloquent, genuine and true to his word. Ed loved Canada and lived his life with integrity and dignity. He leaves behind an enormous legacy of friendships, and his loving wife of 40 years. I offer my condolences to Theresa and extended family. Devoted husband, wise colleague, trusted friend and a true patriot, Ed was one of the good guys.

Retirement CongratulationsStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Fragiskatos Liberal London North Centre, ON

Madam Speaker, I rise today to celebrate the career of Deb Harvey, the executive director of the Grand Theatre in London. She is retiring after 23 years, coming from Nova Scotia on a six-month contract when the theatre was at serious risk of closing due to significant debt.

Since taking the helm, Deb has led the theatre to two decades of surplus, only having a small bump in the road due to COVID-19. Deb is deeply respected in our community. She has been unwavering in her desire to ensure the Grand is a teaching theatre, one that mentors students and apprentices. Deb was instrumental in leading the $9-million Reno2020 project as well, ensuring a safe, new, welcoming space for artists, patrons, staff and volunteers. Undoubtedly, Deb’s departure marks a significant loss for the arts community in London and leaves very big shoes to fill.

I congratulate Deb on a truly successful career. It has been a pleasure to work with her, and our community owes her an enormous debt of gratitude. We wish her nothing but the best in her retirement.

Money LaunderingStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Adam Chambers Conservative Simcoe North, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canada is a money-laundering paradise. The Cullen commission, a British Columbia inquiry into money laundering, just released its final report. It details significant gaps and concerns with our money-laundering laws and regimes in Canada. Canadians have heard stories of hockey bags full of $20 bills going into casinos to come out laundered. The Cullen commission even questions whether B.C. should start its own reporting regime and have its own commissioner of money laundering.

Global criminals are flocking to our shores, using our country and institutions to finance drugs, human trafficking and other crime. This activity also increases the demand for housing, pushing up real estate prices for Canadians across Canada. The government must step up and take responsibility. We now have facts that can no longer be ignored. Anything else would mean being willfully blind.

Of course, the beneficial registry in my private member's bill is a small step, but there is much more to be done. That is why I am calling on the government to launch a national commission and inquiry into money laundering across Canada and give Parliament tangible calls to action to stop this activity and say no to global criminals.

Thornhill AthleteStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Melissa Lantsman Conservative Thornhill, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is not another Raptors NBA championship, but it is worth celebrating. Last week, Andrew Wiggins was instrumental in the Golden State Warriors winning their fourth NBA championship in eight years.

He is a Thornhill boy and that is why it matters. He went to Glen Shields Public School and then Vaughan Secondary School, where he became the world’s top-ranking high school ball player. From there, Andrew pursued a college career in the United States, where he flourished too. After just one year, he was drafted first overall in 2014.

In the final game of the championships, Andrew lit it up, scoring 18 points with six rebounds, five assists, four steals and three blocks. Andrew Wiggins is a great example of all the talent in my community and what we have to offer Canada and the world. Buckle up, Canada, because Wiggins is just getting started. When people watch Wiggins fly, they should just remember that it all started in Thornhill.

I say, “Bring the trophy home, Andrew.”

Canada Summer Jobs ProgramStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Brenda Shanahan Liberal Châteauguay—Lacolle, QC

Mr. Speaker, a hundred or so businesses, organizations and municipalities in the riding of Châteauguay—Lacolle will benefit from the Canada summer jobs program again this year.

I am happy for the opportunity being given to some 400 young people in the region to acquire work experience, often related to their field of study, through the Canada summer jobs program.

Canada summer jobs also allows about 100 companies, organizations and municipalities to train the next generation. People will certainly come across some of these wonderful young people in day camps, tourist attractions or elsewhere. We should encourage them with a smile. They are our leaders of tomorrow.

National Indigenous Peoples DayStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Lori Idlout NDP Nunavut, NU

[Member spoke in Inuktitut and provided the following text:]

ᐅᖅᑲᖅᑎᑦᑎᔨ, ᓯᕗᓪᓕᕐᒥ ᑳᓇᑕᓕᒫᕐᒥᒃ ᓄᓇᖃᖅᑳᖅᓯᒪᔪᓄᑦ ᐅᓪᓗᕆᔭᐅᑎᓪᓗᒍ, ᐅᓪᓗᖃᑦᑎᐊᖁᕙᓯ.

[Member provided the following translation:]

First of all, I wish you all a wonderful Indigenous People's Day.

[English]

I am honoured to speak on National Indigenous Peoples Day. There are many stories that I could share. Inuit, first nations and Métis in Canada have made historic achievements. Among these achievements are the creation, education and graduation of the joint degree program in Canadian common law and indigenous legal orders at the University of Victoria.

I thank the indigenous elders and former students of the residential schools. By their sacrifice, we are regaining our strengths as indigenous peoples. It is by their determination that we are able to celebrate our heritages, languages and hope for future generations. I am so thankful to them.

La BaieStatements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Mario Simard Bloc Jonquière, QC

Mr. Speaker, on June 13, a house in the beautiful area of La Baie was destroyed by a major landslide. Since then, 95 homes have had to be evacuated, which means 192 people do not know if or when they will be able to return home.

My region is no stranger to natural disasters. In 1996, 600 residents of La Baie lost all of their worldly possessions in a flood and, in 1971, a landslide in Saint‑Jean‑Vianney destroyed 42 homes and took the lives of 31 people.

History has taught us that people back home are resilient. The concern and compassion expressed today are already being replaced with the courage, determination and solidarity typical of people from Saguenay—Lac-Saint‑Jean.

In closing, I urge authorities from all levels of government to work together to ensure that this disaster becomes just a bad memory as soon as possible. All of Quebec stands with my friends in La Baie.

Food SecurityStatements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Dave Epp Conservative Chatham-Kent—Leamington, ON

Mr. Speaker, every Canadian and every human being should have access to food.

On June 8, I attended the retirement of Jim Cornelius, the accomplished executive director of the Canadian Foodgrains Bank for over 24 years, five of which overlapped my time with that organization.

Established in 1983, the Canadian Foodgrains Bank has a footprint that can be seen all across Canada in growing projects in farm fields. Local community groups, farmers and church groups dedicate the proceeds of a crop, which are matched by additional Canadian donors and then matched again by the federal government, to efforts to alleviate hunger. My own riding has several such growing projects in Chatham, Leamington, Wheatley, Blenheim and South Buxton, with over 220 across Canada.

Collectively, we were making progress toward ending hunger, but conflicts and war have reversed those improvements. Now, with Russia's illegal invasion of Ukraine, the world needs more Canadian grain, more Canadian energy and more Canadian expertise in food production.

A recent U.S. president stated, “The world needs more Canada.” I agree. Our own security is enhanced when global destabilization does not happen because of global food and energy insecurity.

National Indigenous Peoples DayStatements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Jaime Battiste Liberal Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, today is National Indigenous Peoples Day in Canada. On top of celebrating indigenous history, culture and resilience, today also marks the one-year anniversary of the royal assent of Bill C-15, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act.

UNDRIPA breathes life into aboriginal and treaty rights, and concretely advances reconciliation. For over 30 years, indigenous groups advocated at the United Nations and in Canada to be self-determining nations. UNDRIPA turns the page on the colonial legacies of the past and moves us to a new chapter based on the recognition of indigenous people's inalienable rights. As we collaboratively work to implement UNDRIPA, it will be the foundation for a renewed relationship based on fair, just and consensual relations between nations.

Our government is committed to not just celebrating National Indigenous Peoples Day, but continuing to co-develop legislation that will improve the quality of life for indigenous people across Canada.

SportOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Candice Bergen Conservative Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday we learned that government officials were made aware four years ago of reports of sexual assault by players at Hockey Canada. They did nothing and no one was held accountable. The only thing the Liberals did was give Hockey Canada another $14 million.

For a Prime Minister who claims to be a feminist, there seems to be a pattern of covering up and rewarding bad behaviour. It seems women really do not matter to the Prime Minister. How could he have let this happen?

SportOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, as a government, we have continually stood up to push back against sexual misconduct and harassment in organizations and workplaces across the country, and Hockey Canada is no different. Organizations and people in leadership positions must do their utmost to take decisions to end this culture and the trivialization of sexual violence in sport. It is why we commissioned the financial audit to shed light on the use of public funds. We want to get to the bottom of this, and all options are being considered to determine the next steps. This behaviour is unacceptable.

COVID-19 Response MeasuresOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Candice Bergen Conservative Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, it is a repeat pattern and the Liberals are either complicit or incompetent. Either way, women are being harmed.

Now the NDP-Liberals are going to force a continuation of hybrid Parliament for another year. The Prime Minister and his Liberal ministers can travel around the world and the NDP can go on junkets, but they do not want to show up here to work. They want to collect a full-time paycheque while doing part-time work.

It is true the Prime Minister does not want to be here because he is afraid of accountability, but the New Democrats do not want to be here because they are afraid of hard work. Is that not the truth?

COVID-19 Response MeasuresOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we know that this pandemic has created hardships in workplaces around the country, but indeed people adapted. That was one of the innovations we brought in with a hybrid Parliament. IT allowed people suffering from COVID, while public health measures kept us safe, to be able to work.

I know there are many more people who continue to benefit from being able to do work remotely. We need to understand that this is a workplace, like others, and ensuring that there is an ability to do this work in responsible ways, while adjusting to the realities of the future, is something we will continue to do.

COVID-19 Response MeasuresOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Candice Bergen Conservative Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, gas station attendants, factory workers, nurses, janitors and farmers all show up for work, but the New Democrats, with the help of the Liberals, want to work from the comfort of their homes. How entitled are they? The New Democrats should be ashamed of themselves for propping up the Liberals and even more ashamed of themselves for not wanting to come to Ottawa to do their job.

Will the Prime Minister do the right thing and put an end to the hybrid Parliament so that we can all be here in Ottawa doing our jobs for Canadians?