House of Commons photo

Crucial Fact

  • His favourite word was divided.

Last in Parliament April 1997, as Independent MP for Beauce (Québec)

Won his last election, in 1993, with 40% of the vote.

Statements in the House

Employment Equity Act December 13th, 1994

I vote yea, Mr. Speaker.

Immigration Act December 13th, 1994

Mr. Speaker, I vote for the motion.

Immigration Act December 13th, 1994

Mr. Speaker, I vote against it.

Immigration Act December 13th, 1994

I vote yes, Mr. Speaker.

Canada Grain Act December 6th, 1994

Mr. Speaker, I vote nay.

(The House divided on Motion No. 4, which was negatived on the following division:)

Canada Grain Act December 6th, 1994

No.

(The House divided on Motion No. 2, which was negatived on the following division:)

Canada Grain Act December 6th, 1994

Nay, Mr. Speaker.

(The House divided on Motion No. 1, which was negatived on the following division:)

Department Of Industry Act December 6th, 1994

I vote yea, Mr. Speaker.

(The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)

Job Finding Clubs December 6th, 1994

Mr. Speaker, after 10 years of existence, the services offered by Job Finding Clubs have been modified following a change in the rules of the game by Human Resources Development Canada. The department requires that a large percentage of training referrals be UI recipients, thus closing the door to those left out of the statistics, who were the main users of services offered by Job Finding Clubs.

The goal is, of course, commendable: returning unemployed workers to the labour force as quickly as possible. But what are we doing for young people just out of school and for people without income, who would greatly benefit from job finding sessions but whom the government is now trying to exclude on the pretext that they are not counted in the official statistics? They are human beings with an urgent need to find work, and I think that the department should relax its rules.

Federalism October 4th, 1994

Mr. Speaker, the world is in constant evolution. Changes occur everywhere and people easily adapt.

However, we do not see that evolution with the government. Why insist on maintaining an uncompromising, static, hermetic and rigid, if not obsolete, federalism? The time has come to be more open and flexible. What is the government waiting for to end the status quo in its relations with the provinces? For goodness sake, try to be more modern in your federalist approach! The government should take heed of the legitimate claims made by provinces, including Quebec, because they reflect modernism and common sense.

The word "evolution" is not part of the vocabulary of mandarins and some elected representatives display a lack of thoughtfulness. Everywhere in this country there is a consensus in favour of decentralization. The time has come for the government to give back to Quebec and other provinces the powers which are theirs under the Constitution.