House of Commons Hansard #68 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was standing.

Topics

Minister of Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I can only say that, obviously, Minister Fortier has a great deal of work to do in the wake of the actions of previous ministers, such as Gagliano, and the Liberal Party of Canada.

Minister of Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is unable to state a single achievement. This is just more idle talk.

Workers in Montreal are even being penalized by this minority Conservative government. I am referring to textile workers and film creators. And just this morning, we learned that workers at Bombardier are losing their jobs. Meanwhile, the minister is dodging and hiding in the other place.

Will the Prime Minister recognize that Montrealers are poorly served by his government?

Minister of Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Obviously, Mr. Speaker, given the Liberal government's record, Senator Fortier has a lot of work on his hands.

I can assure the House, however, that the Conservative Party of Canada will have a good candidate running in that riding. I am anxious to see who will be running for the Liberal Party of Canada.

The Environment
Oral Questions

October 24th, 2006 / 2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, on the pretext of re-evaluating all the environmental programs, the government has frozen the wind power production incentive. This is more evidence that this government does not consider the environment a priority.

Can the Prime Minister explain why he is making a point of re-evaluating the viability of environmental programs such as the wind power program, when numerous tax benefits for the oil industry are renewed year after year with no analysis?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I can only say that we have a long-term plan on the environment and particularly on air pollution and greenhouse gases. It will include technologies to develop renewable energy, including wind energy.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, if it includes wind energy, I do not see why he is cancelling the program. He is suspending the program.

Is he not really saying, too bad for the Kyoto protocol targets; long live the oil companies? Nothing else interests him, because he is blocking all the initiatives except for the oil companies' tax benefits.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Saanich—Gulf Islands
B.C.

Conservative

Gary Lunn Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, as the Prime Minister said, wind power will be part of the future. We believe that Canada is developing and emerging as an energy superpower and we want our reputation to ensure that Canada delivers clean energy.

Renewable energy will play a very important role in Canada's future energy mix, which includes everything from solar to biomass to wind. Obviously we believe this is very important and will play a fundamental role in Canada's future energy supply.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Claude DeBellefeuille Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, after Kyoto, the government is getting ready to kill programs relating to clean energy, such as wind energy, by freezing all the money earmarked for them since April.

Yet in Quebec alone, this form of energy will require $7.5 billion in investments over the next 10 years.

Is this not more evidence that by siding with the oil companies, as it is doing, the government is penalizing both wind energy and Quebec?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Saanich—Gulf Islands
B.C.

Conservative

Gary Lunn Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, I think it is very important that we correct the record. In fact, this government has absolutely not killed the wind program. That program is fully subscribed, which shows the success of this program and how important wind is.

I will say again that renewable energy will continue to play a very important role in Canada's future energy mix as Canada emerges as an energy superpower. We want to ensure that Canada delivers the cleanest energy possible and we will be there to support it.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Claude DeBellefeuille Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, I can tell the minister that the program has in fact been suspended. The environment commissioner told us so.

Wind energy not only represents $7.5 billion in investments in Quebec over the next 10 years, it also creates 43,000 jobs, according to the Canadian Wind Energy Association.

Will the Prime Minister admit that his government's energy choices favouring the oil companies could come at a huge cost to Quebec's economy?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Saanich—Gulf Islands
B.C.

Conservative

Gary Lunn Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the energy for this government is clean energy. We are working with all sectors, from the renewable energies and wind and solar to biomass. We believe nuclear energy has an important role to play in Canada's future energy supply, an energy that puts out absolutely no emissions or greenhouse gases

We are working with every single sector. We believe the future is in technology. Technology will help us win these battles. Canada will emerge as a supplier of clean energy and will deliver that technology around the world.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal-Conservative mission in Afghanistan is fundamentally unbalanced. We see that approximately $1 is spent on aid for every $9 spent on combat. We have media reports out today suggesting that as a result of this fundamental imbalance there will be more and more Afghans who starve this winter.

It is not just the NDP that believes the mission is completely off track. Dale Wilson, whose son died in Afghanistan, said yesterday that, despite originally supporting the mission, “the mission isn't moving forward...and my support has wavered”.

Will the Prime Minister heed the growing calls of Canadians, including more and more military families, and rethink this mission?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Once again, Mr. Speaker, Canada's efforts in Afghanistan are multi-faceted, obviously. There remain important security challenges in southern Afghanistan. Those security challenges are the very things that are threatening the well-being and the economic development and social development of the people of Afghanistan. That is why we are making sure we can promote security in that part of the country, so we can promote development and help the people with the very real challenges that the leader of the NDP mentions.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Wilson is not the only military family member standing up and questioning this mission. Chris Craig, whose son is preparing for a second tour, and Paul Short, the father of a 25 year old army medic, are others.

Just as we in the NDP have done, they ask the tough questions to support their serving family members. Will the Prime Minister honour their courage and commit to refocusing this unbalanced mission?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Once again, Mr. Speaker, I and other members of the government speak regularly to members of the Canadian Forces and to their families. We are proud to tell them that we are behind the work they are doing and we support it 100% all the time. We wish all members of this chamber would do the same.