House of Commons Hansard #68 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was standing.

Topics

Canada Labour Code
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, I would like to remind the members of this House that in 1999 there was a new bill and this question was reviewed by this House. It was decided that it was important to preserve a balance in labour relations. The Canada Labour Code permits the use of replacement workers, but they must not be used to undermine unions’ representational capacity. If that is the case, the unions may complain to the Canada Industrial Relations Board and have the right to start proceedings for that purpose. Only two provinces have an anti-strikebreaker law. The other eight do not want one.

Canada Labour Code
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Carole Lavallée Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is very possible that a majority of the members of this House will vote for an anti-strikebreaker law tomorrow.

Will the minister, who voted for this law in 1991, use his status as Minister of Labour this time to overturn the will of the House and deny workers who are covered by the Canada Labour Code the protection of an anti-strikebreaker law?

Canada Labour Code
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, since the anti-strikebreaker law came into force in 1999, there have been 18 unfair labour practices complaints in Canada. Of those, 13 complaints to the Canada Industrial Relations Board were withdrawn, three were heard and dismissed by the board, and only two complaints are still pending.

Studies even show that in the provinces that have anti-strikebreaker legislation, disputes last longer.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, last Thursday, while the Minister of Transport was battling the Quebec government about the Kyoto protocol, his colleague, the Minister of the Environment, obtained a perfect score, if her aim was to be criticized by absolutely everyone.

Today's edition of the French newspaper Le Monde criticizes the government for caving in to George Bush. This is becoming embarrassing. The comments on her plan range from “bad” to “very bad” and even “rotten”.

Which of these descriptions does the minister like best for her plan?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, as I indicated yesterday, cities and Canadians across the country want and need clean air. We know that smog days are rising while the opposition is playing politics with the clean air act.

If the opposition will not listen to Canadians, maybe it will listen to the Federation of Canadian Municipalities which said that recent announcements signal that the present federal government is prepared to take a leadership role and develop an environmental plan that is capable of delivering tangible results for Canadians. Mr. Speaker, it did not stop there. It said that municipalities can and want to be partners in--

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Honoré-Mercier.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, today's edition of the French newspaper Le Monde refers to “Canada's surrender”. It mentions that “—Canada, a former leader in environmental issues, now cuts a sorry figure”.

The minister is being attacked on all fronts. The Quebec government is furious and feels betrayed. Environmental groups and top scientists are losing hope in the face of so much irresponsibility. And now, the international press is coming down on Canada.

I am sad to say the minister must be feeling very lonely. Apart from George Bush, does she have any friends left?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I will take friends like the Canadian Lung Association and the Canadian Medical Association who are saying that millions of Canadians suffer from lung cancer, and while the opposition refuses to help them, we are actually proposing Canada's clean air act which, for the first time in Canadian history, will actually regulate indoor air, which is the leading cause of lung cancer in Canada among non-smokers.

If the member actually cared about clean air and cared about the health of Canadians, he would support the act.

Decorum
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Canada's chief diplomat and our face to the world on issues like human rights, has compromised himself because of his highly publicized slight against women, a slight that is now being reported by international news services. It is condemned by the Canadian Federation of University Women, the National Council of Women, the National Association of Women and the Law, the YWCA, Equal Voice, the Canadian Council of Muslim Women, and many others.

Would it not be better to simply acknowledge the minister's mistake, apologize and distance the government from the implications of this ill-considered remark?

Decorum
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

You have already ruled on this matter, Mr. Speaker, but certainly we can all do our part to raise the decorum in the House. The member suggests where we should start. Let me suggest something to him. Why does he not start supporting the clean air act which is the first real bill to clean up the environment that has been introduced in the country in almost 20 years. He could be doing that, rather than spending the House's time on this business.

Decorum
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, in dealing with the horrible slur against women uttered by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the government's tactic is obviously to stonewall and deny, deny, deny. Instead of being accountable, they seek to trivialize the matter and pretend it never happened. But it did happen, Mr. Speaker. It was witnessed personally by several members of the House. It was recorded on tape. It was verified in the news media.

I ask the government, does it specifically deny that the Minister of Foreign Affairs last Thursday during question period said, “You already have her”. Did he say that or not?

Decorum
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, you have already ruled on this matter, on what you heard and what is on the record on this. I was not here in the House on that particular day. In fact, I was very pleased to be welcoming the Prime Minister of Canada to my riding of Niagara Falls. I was not here that particular day, but I can tell the hon. member that we all want to raise the level of decorum in the House.

I would suggest to him that if he really wants to help the public interest, to get busy, to get behind the federal accountability act and some of the other pieces of legislation that have been stalled over in the other place. It would be much better for the hon. member to spend his time doing that.

Justice
Oral Questions

October 24th, 2006 / 2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Patrick Brown Barrie, ON

Mr. Speaker, when Canadians elected this new government, they elected a government to get tough on crime. They elected a government to stop the revolving door of the justice system.

One of the ways this government has started restoring Canada's confidence in the justice system is with Bill C-9, which implements our platform commitments to end house arrest for serious crimes.

Could the justice minister try to explain why the opposition has watered down this important bill?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, our party promised to eliminate house arrest for people who commit serious crime.

Last night in the justice committee, opposition members, led by the Liberals, unanimously passed amendments that would virtually gut Bill C-9. The Liberals want house arrest to still apply to arson, to robbery, to auto theft, and to break and enter into homes. Victims of these crimes will tell us that house arrest is not a suitable punishment; it is a joke.

Why will the Liberals not help us restore Canadians' confidence in the justice system?

Homelessness
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, on August 17 theMinister of Human Resources and Social Development stated in reference to SCPI, which is a very crucial program for homeless Canadians, “There have been no reductions and will be no reductions to this funding”.

I would like to ask the minister what funding plans the government has for SCPI for fiscal year 2007-08 and fiscal year 2008-09.