House of Commons Hansard #94 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was work.

Topics

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Joy Smith Kildonan—St. Paul, MB

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women recently announced some important changes to the status of women program. There has been much misrepresentation from opposition MPs who cannot understand that spending 31¢ to deliver $1 is not helping women in their communities.

Could the minister explain the changes our government has made and tell us what she is doing for Canadian women?

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, only a party that believes that women are weak would deceive and mislead the same women in Canada.

It comes down to very simple math. It was costing 31¢ to deliver $1. Now it will cost 17¢. Thirty-one minus 17 means 14¢ more for women. It is very simple. There is no program cut. It is simple math. Savings in administration mean more money for women in Canada.

Shipbuilding Industry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, there is an industry in this country which could provide thousands of jobs and economic opportunity right across the country, but the government continues to ignore this industry. It is the shipbuilding industry.

The government is in negotiations with the EFTA countries to reduce and eliminate the tariffs of ships built in other countries coming into Canada.

My question is for the hon.Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade. Why is the government in negotiation with other countries to put the final death knell in our shipbuilding industry?

Shipbuilding Industry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Simcoe—Grey
Ontario

Conservative

Helena Guergis Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his valuable contribution on this file, but the fact is that Canada can no longer afford to continue with the Liberal policy of complacency with respect to free trade agreements. Since NAFTA almost 13 years ago, we have seen only three agreements, while other countries, such as Australia and the United States are moving at a much faster pace.

With respect to the shipbuilding industry, the hon. member works very closely with it, as has our government. We will continue to work with the industry very closely, hear its concerns, ensure they are addressed and only proceed in an agreement that is to the best benefit for all Canadians.

Shipbuilding Industry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, if the hon. member believes that, then why has the industry minister not met with his own committee? The Shipbuilding and Industrial Marine Advisory Committee has asked to meet with the industry minister for 11 months and still there has been no meeting.

The committee has been asking for recommendations since 2001 which would assist the shipbuilding industry, so that we would not have to have tariffs on ferries for example, which is being done in British Columbia. British Columbia could be building its own ferries according to the recommendations of the advisory committee.

Why is the government so reluctant to not only meet with this committee but to accept its recommendations to get the shipbuilding industry once and for all in the air in this country?

Shipbuilding Industry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, the government is committed to a competitive shipbuilding industry. We certainly want to make Canada an attractive place. We recognize the huge global pressures in this sector and are committed to an ongoing review of our policies to ensure that they are met.

If I could ask the member from the Maritimes for his support of our defence minister's defence policy, we are starting to rebuild our navy with three joint support ships. Those ships will be built right here in Canada.

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Simms Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—Windsor, NL

Mr. Speaker, the government is doing everything in its power to demolish the Canadian Wheat Board. It is threatening to kick out its chief executive officer because he is doing his job and not adhering to their ideology. Farm producers are concerned.

Will the government promise that supply management will never be affected by the kind of measures currently being applied to the Canadian Wheat Board?

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I would like to answer my friend's question. Supply management and the Canadian Wheat Board are two completely different issues, and we have no intention of touching supply management as such.

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Bradley Trost Saskatoon—Humboldt, SK

Mr. Speaker, hydrogen is becoming an emerging energy source that could one day replace fossil fuels. Yesterday the Minister of Natural Resources promoted the new Ford hydrogen combustion engine shuttle buses, some of which will be used on Parliament Hill.

Could the minister comment on the use of hydrogen and its benefits to the environment?

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague from Saskatoon—Humboldt for his excellent question.

As the hon. Minister of Transport said previously, Canada's new government has pledged to provide Canadians with a sustainable environment by ensuring air and water quality. It has offered positive solutions to environmental problems. Our government believes that there is a huge potential for hydrogen technologies to improve economy and air quality. This initiative is an excellent opportunity to demonstrate the benefits.

Unlike the previous Liberal government which was all talk and no action, we take action. This pilot project reflects the commitment we have made to maintain our leadership internationally in the field of hydrogen technologies.

Trade
Oral Questions

Noon

Liberal

Hedy Fry Vancouver Centre, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canada's economic security depends on our ability to be competitive and export our goods into emerging Asian markets. Asia contains the fastest growing economies in the world. That is why the previous Liberal government invested almost $600 million in the Pacific gateway strategy. The new Conservative government pretended it would honour the strategy. Instead it delayed and diluted it; another broken promise.

Why does the government continue to put the gateway strategy and Canada's global prosperity at risk?

Trade
Oral Questions

Noon

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, I congratulate my colleague from Vancouver Centre for getting it exactly wrong.

When the Liberals were in power, they promised $590 million for the Pacific gateway, but they in fact did not spend it. The Liberals allocated it, but the money was never spent.

What we have done is put forward $600 million in the Asia-Pacific gateway for real projects that will get real results for British Columbians and all Canadians.

Gordon Campbell supports our plan. Sam Sullivan supports our plan. All the western provinces and indeed this entire government are supportive of the Pacific gateway. It is going to get real results for all Canadians. We are proud to deliver what the Liberals failed to do.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

December 8th, 2006 / noon

Bloc

Luc Malo Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, we have learned that a Canadian mining company operating in Ecuador has been the subject of complaints for hiring paramilitaries. This news raises concerns about respect for human rights.

Will the Prime Minister show leadership, and put a stop to the human rights violations and environmental abuses committed by certain Canadian businesses operating abroad?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

Noon

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we take human rights very seriously. The Prime Minister has said that very clearly. It is a tenet of our foreign policy.

I will take the question under advisement, look into it and report back.

Notice of Motion
Ways and Means
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, as Minister of Labour responsible for the Wage Earner Protection Program Act and pursuant to Standing Order 83(1), I have the honour to table a notice of ways and means motion to amend the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act, the Wage Earner Protection Program Act and Chapter 47 of the Statutes of Canada.

I ask that an order of the day be designated to debate the motion.