House of Commons Hansard #94 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was work.

Topics

Justice
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Joy Smith Kildonan—St. Paul, MB

Mr. Speaker, late last night three Winnipeg police officers were shot while executing a drug warrant. I would like to express my heartfelt sympathies to the officers and their families. It is unacceptable that officers are put in these kinds of situations, acting on behalf of Canadians.

Our government stands solidly in support of assisting our police officers because they are our front line protection against crimes that are destroying our communities.

Liberal and NDP MPs have gutted our legislation to restrict house arrest for dangerous criminals, just like these drug dealers. They are also holding up our bill on increased mandatory minimum sentences on gun crime.

When will they stop concerning themselves about the rights of criminals and support our efforts to restore balance in the justice system by supporting victims and police officers who protect us?

As the mother of a police officer, I would encourage all members in the House to stop being soft on crime and start standing up for taxpaying citizens.

Teen Suicide
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Anthony Rota Nipissing—Timiskaming, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to bring awareness to the issue of teen suicide. According to Statistics Canada, suicide accounts for 24% of all deaths among 15 to 24 year olds and 16% among 16 to 44 year olds in our country.

In the words of my constituent, Chantal Fleming, who lost her only son Ryan to suicide:

Until your life has been devastated by the suicide loss of your child, family member or friend, a person can never truly comprehend these statistics; they are simply too chilling for our minds to understand.

We must break the silence on teen suicide. We must also look to provide services and support networks to those who need it most, teenagers and young adults. Furthermore, we need to develop better programs for those who are bereaved by the suicide of a loved one.

In memory of Ryan Fleming, I call on all hon. members to help raise awareness of this devastating reality and to work together to help develop and improve long term support solutions.

Standing Committee on Official Languages
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to express my gratitude to the members of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages for the work they are doing with their cross-Canada tour. This tour is giving us the opportunity to learn about the achievements of francophone and anglophone minority language communities, as well as the challenges they face.

The committee is an important part of our parliamentary system, and on behalf of the Minister for la Francophonie and Official Languages, I salute this initiative.

I would also like to thank all of the community representatives who appeared before the committee during its stops in eastern and western Canada. Our new government's commitment to these communities is steadfast. Their vitality is an essential part of our linguistic duality.

This is the first time the committee has travelled to meet francophone and anglophone minority language communities, and it happened under a Conservative government.

Homelessness
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Dawn Black New Westminster—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, as winter approaches, the situation for the homeless in my communities of New Westminster, Port Moody and Coquitlam worsens. In New Westminster alone, the number of my constituents who are homeless has risen an incredible 33% in recent years. Not only is it unacceptable, it is disgraceful that people are sleeping on the streets in my riding or on the banks of the Fraser River or underneath the SkyTrain overpass.

There are some wonderful organizations, including the Tri-Cities Housing Coalition, Hope for Freedom Society and the New Westminster Homeless Coalition, that work so hard for affordable housing and for the homeless, but without action from the government they can only do so much.

Because the government fails to support housing projects, many organizations will have to scale back or shut down, maybe even before Christmas, as their funds run out.

When will the government enact a national housing strategy so that no Canadian has no other choice but to sleep on the streets?

Aboriginal Affairs
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Tina Keeper Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, this Sunday, December 10, is International Human Rights Day. It is a day on which the entire international community will both celebrate the human rights achievements made over this past century and acknowledge the human rights that we must address.

I wish to remind Canadians that they do not have to look so far to find issues with human rights, as there is the issue of first nations child welfare. The national Wen: De Report on first nations child welfare has provided Indian and Northern Affairs Canada with an evidence based solution to redress the inequity in child welfare funding.

Despite acknowledging that the current federal funding is inadequate, the government has not implemented the Wen: De Report recommendations.

The report also highlights the jurisdictional and departmental disputes involving the federal and provincial governments that have meant first nations children with disabilities or complex medical needs are denied or face serious delay in services available to other Canadian children.

The tragic story of a first nations child named Jordan who died because he did not receive access to medical services in a timely way was presented at the United Nations in the Jordan's principle, calling for an end to these disputes.

Carlo Benedetti
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Marcel Lussier Brossard—La Prairie, QC

Mr. Speaker, Carlo Benedetti, a resident of my riding and a master's student in chemical engineering at the Université de Sherbrooke, won first place at the international conference of the International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering, ISPE, held in Orlando, Florida, on November 6.

Carlo Benedetti won first place in the graduate division for the quality and presentation of his project, which was about a new method for the analysis of knowledge acquisition processes to improve the efficiency of prescription drug production.

Mr. Benedetti undertook the study of this process as part of a project supervised by Professor Abatzoglou, thanks to the financial participation of Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, the Université de Montréal and the Université de Sherbrooke.

I would like to offer my sincere congratulations to Carlo Benedetti for his remarkable success at the international level and for having represented us so honourably.

Health
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, constituents from my riding are petitioning the government to implement tax incentives to encourage Canadians to take out gym memberships.

They believe it is time for the government to focus on prevention rather than treatment as the overarching principle of our health care system. They rightly believe that, in addition to lowering health care costs, this would mean physically fit citizens who are happier and more productive in their personal and professional lives.

Although tax incentives for gym memberships will not empower all citizens to lead healthy lifestyles, they will help eliminate unnecessary financial barriers to physical activity for many. The government should therefore implement such a tax incentive in its next budget.

Softwood Lumber
Statements By Members

December 8th, 2006 / 11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Helena Guergis Simcoe—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to stand here in the House as the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade and tell members that a lot of hard work and negotiations went into the softwood lumber agreement. Not only am I proud that Bill C-24 passed, but I am also proud to be part of a government that does what it says it is going to do and works as a team.

On Wednesday I was disappointed to see all but two Liberal MPs stand in the House of Commons and vote against the softwood lumber agreement. This is shameful, given the support for the agreement by the provinces, including the province of Quebec, where the new Liberal leader is from, and the support from industry, labour and unions in Quebec.

How could the Liberals not support an agreement that is obviously in the best interests of Canada? This further demonstrates the Liberal tradition of playing political games. By not supporting the deal, the Liberals are putting their own partisan interests ahead of the needs of all Canadians.

RCMP Commissioner
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, the facts are very clear, and they were clear long before last Monday.

There were two letters indicating that Commissioner Zaccardelli was about to change his testimony. One was even addressed to the Deputy Minister of Public Safety. The minister's officials knew that the commissioner was going to change his testimony. In addition, Commissioner Zaccardelli says he told the minister himself directly.

Why, then, is the minister continuing to maintain that he knew nothing? How can he continue to deny the truth?

RCMP Commissioner
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals are the ones denying the truth.

This government is continuing, as always, to tell the truth about this case. It is clear that Commissioner Zaccardelli expressed the desire to testify a second time before the public safety committee. This was obviously his choice and his responsibility. It would have been totally irresponsible for the minister or the government to prevent such testimony by the commissioner, who has taken responsibility for his actions and tendered his resignation.

RCMP Commissioner
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister and that parliamentary secretary can keep saying ”the dog ate my homework”, but it is now painfully evident that the minister knew that Canadians were being misled and did nothing about it. The minister is desperately trying to change the subject by saying that “anything I could have done would have been called political interference”. This is nonsense.

Canadians want to know why, when there was evidence they were being deceived, the minister did absolutely nothing to get them the correct information. Why did he aid and abet this deception?

RCMP Commissioner
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the minister and the government found out that the commissioner wanted to clarify his testimony at the same time and in the same way as everyone else, and of course we respected the commissioner's right to do so.

The real question is, why is it that the Liberals favour political interference in the operations of the RCMP? Why is it that the former Liberal solicitor general, the member for Malpeque, said with respect to the RCMP investigation into the Liberal income trust fiasco and scandal that he “felt strongly that the very next day the minister at the time of public security should have asked for” the commissioner's “removal”.

Why is that he wanted the government to fire the RCMP Commissioner for investigating the Liberals?

RCMP Commissioner
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, here is what former RCMP legal counsel Alain-Robert Nadeau said:

Personally, I can see only two alternatives that would restore the confidence of Canadians: a royal commission of inquiry into the operations of the RCMP or, more simply, the minister's resignation. Such is the price of our freedom.

I would like to know what the minister thinks of Mr. Nadeau's advice?

RCMP Commissioner
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, it is very clear that the Liberals continue to try to distract public attention away from the fact that the entire Arar fiasco occurred under their watch. Mr. Arar was sent to Syria, was tortured in a Syrian jail, a former Liberal minister of foreign affairs denied that he was being tortured, and all of this happened under their watch.

Canadians are still waiting for a little patina of humility from the Liberal Party. When are the Liberals going to stand up and apologize for the mistreatment of Canadians abroad under their watch?

RCMP Commissioner
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Mark Holland Ajax—Pickering, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would ask that the parliamentary secretary take this question seriously: why? Why did the government wait until outrage gripped the nation before it acted?

Despite contradiction after contradiction, a letter foretelling it all, ministerial meetings with the commissioner and urgings from his own cabinet, the Prime Minister did nothing. Worse than nothing, the Prime Minister gave the commissioner his unqualified, unreserved support through it all.

Why? Why did the Prime Minister do nothing when he knew everything?