House of Commons Hansard #94 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was work.

Topics

Aeronautics Industry
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Industry has indicated the government's continued and ongoing support for the aeronautics and defence industries. I know this issue is tremendously important in Quebec but it is also important in Ontario.

The minister has been looking at enhancements and improvements that we can make to the technology partnerships program so it can meet the needs of a competitive Canadian industry. Aeronautics employs some 75,000 people in Canada and the defence industries employ more. This is incredibly important and the minister will be coming forward, in short order--

Aeronautics Industry
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Don Valley East.

Status of Women
Oral Questions

December 8th, 2006 / 11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Yasmin Ratansi Don Valley East, ON

Mr. Speaker, during the election, the Prime Minister promised to protect the rights of women. However, the Conservative government has done nothing but turn its back on Canadian women. The court challenges program has been slashed. All but two of the Status of Women regional offices have been closed. In my riding, the Association of Women of Indian Origin in Canada depends on federal funding to do its important work.

Could the minister guarantee this organization's funding will not be axed?

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, we can guarantee that the $10.8 million for women's programs will continue to be there. It is there now and it will be there in the next fiscal year.

The good news is that all the money we found in streamlining the administration will be available in the next fiscal year, which is $5 million more to help the organizations that are actually making a difference in the lives of women in the community.

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Yasmin Ratansi Don Valley East, ON

Mr. Speaker, I asked a specific question about a specific program and all I received from the minister was a repeated blah, blah, blah. I say shame on the minister.

Why will she not have some spine and admit that the $5 million that she axed from the budget is a cut? She does not understand math. It is not a reinvestment.

We now hear that the National Association of Women and the Law is concerned about the future of its funding. Why will the minister not have some courage and admit that she signed off on these cuts and is trying to camouflage the facts?

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, I am happy to report that we have had meetings with immigrant women organizations that are actually doing work for immigrant women. They have been in to see us and we have told them that $5 million in additional money will be available. They indicated that they were not told that by the opposition party. Once they knew the true facts, they said that it was good news.

We have been very clear. As a result of savings in administration, this government is putting the money back into women, not into Liberal Party friends.

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Hedy Fry Vancouver Centre, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government's shocking cuts to Status of Women have huge implications for aboriginal women and their children. The Native Women's Association, which is largely funded by Status of Women, was before committee this week to raise the alarm that its funding may be next on the chopping block.

Could the minister guarantee that the funding for this organization will not be cut?

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, members of the opposition party, when they cut, they took the money and removed it from being accessible to women. This government found savings in government spending and the money will go to women. It is very simple. A cut is made when there is no money and an increase is when the savings go directly to women.

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Hedy Fry Vancouver Centre, BC

Mr. Speaker, cancelling the Kelowna accord, cuts in the funding for aboriginal languages, cuts in the first nations stop smoking programs and $200 million in cuts to improve access to early learning and child care for first nations.

This Sunday marks International Human Rights Day. The theme is fighting poverty. Instead of cutting programs, why will the government not take real steps to address aboriginal poverty?

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, I find it quite alarming that the member opposite would ask that question. The Liberals had 13 years to ensure that the rights of aboriginal women would be there. In fact, it is this government that introduced matrimonial rights for aboriginal women, a fundamental right that every Canadian woman, including aboriginal women, should have recognized.

Agriculture
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Luc Harvey Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, the new Government of Canada reacted quickly regarding the golden nematode issue, so that the regulated zone was only restricted to the region of Saint-Amable. This quick and decisive action allowed trading activities worth several millions of dollars to Quebec's agriculture to resume. However, producers in Saint-Amable are quite concerned, following the collapse of their markets.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food tell this House what the government intends to do to help these producers?

Agriculture
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his excellent question. It is with great pleasure that, yesterday, the minister and I announced a plan to help producers in Saint-Amable who are affected by the golden nematode issue.

The federal government is contributing $5.4 million to this plan, including $2 million in new money that will be paid to the 28 producers affected.

Indeed, unlike the Bloc Québécois, we are in a position to provide support to producers in Saint-Amable.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Jean Crowder Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Inuit of Nunavut filed a $1 billion lawsuit against the federal government this week. The Conservatives want to spend billions of dollars to support Canada's sovereignty in the Arctic in the face of global warming.

Will the minister confirm that he will invest at least a part of that $1 billion on the people of Nunavut on whose survival and prosperity Canada has depended for its claim of sovereignty?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, the government has been very supportive of the people of Nunavut and will continue to be. Unfortunately, a lawsuit was launched against the Government of Canada this week. It was filed in a court of justice in Nunavut. I must also suggest that the Nunavut Premier Okalik has expressed public disappointment with this course of action.

Having said that, the matter is before the court, we will address it as such and we will continue to be supportive of the people of Nunavut.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Jean Crowder Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, the lack of federal commitment means that less than 45% of Inuit have the jobs that were promised in the settlement agreement. This costs Canada $65 million a year to import southern workers into Nunavut and yet Nunavut has the highest unemployment rate in Canada. It does not include the addiction, suicide and health costs associated with unemployment, nor the lost wages to Inuit of $123 million a year.

Will the minister explain how this situation makes any economic sense?