House of Commons Hansard #27 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Human Resources and Social Development
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, as members well know, I too come from an area that is largely dependent upon agriculture and tourism. Those are my top areas of interest from an economic point of view from home.

That is why whatever programs we go forward with are not going to apply just to specific areas, but will be applied in a nationwide context that will be in the best interests of all Canadians.

Human Resources and Social Development
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, the answer is clear. The minister says, yes, defend your citizens and you will buy their votes.

This party is beginning to show its true colours. It is enough to recall the comments made the current Prime Minister relatively recently when he said that Atlantic Canadians are a defeatist people.

The minister should apologize to everyone in the Atlantic provinces. There is certainly nothing wrong with wanting to ensure a decent future. The reason for an extension of the pilot projects would be just that.

I asked a very simple question and I would like a clear answer. Will the minister show the slightest compassion for the seasonal workers in my riding?

Human Resources and Social Development
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, this government intends to show compassion for workers in all ridings across this country. That is why we are reviewing the results of the pilot project. I stress it is a pilot project. That means it is a test to make sure that the program works and that it is cost effective for all Canadian taxpayers, that it delivers what it is supposed to. That is what we are going to ensure our programs do. That is why we are going to make sure we bring in something that works.

Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Steven Blaney Lévis—Bellechasse, QC

Mr. Speaker, what else does the Auditor General's report reveal? It reveals the Liberal's mismanagement and waste.

In 2002, the lease for the Montreal offices of the Economic Development Agency of Canada was up for renewal. The Minister followed the usual practice and signed a new lease in another building. The former secretary of state responsible for the agency complained to the current member for Wascana, who agreed to renew the old lease in a more expensive building, resulting in two leases for a single agency.

Will the Parliamentary Secretary for the Minister of Public Works tell us the reasons for this interference?

Public Works and Government Services
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, I am afraid I have bad news for the hon. member and for taxpayers.

In the last Liberal government, as a result of one letter from one Liberal minister across the table to another, the lease at Place Victoria was renewed. Professionals at the Department of Public Works did their job, but the Liberals ignored their counsel and wasted $4.6 million leasing two buildings. They leased two buildings when only one in fact was needed.

The Conservative government and the Department of Public Works will always get value for taxpayer dollars because we have learned, unlike the Liberals, how not to waste money.

Human Rights
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Wayne Marston Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, on Monday the United Nations will release a report on Canada's human rights record. In recent years Canada has done more to ignore its human rights commitments than it has done to honour them. It is time to end the Liberal legacy of inaction and start complying.

What has the government done to conform with the recommendations that will be made on Monday and what measures has it put in place to ensure an open, transparent and publicly accountable process for coordinating the implementation and compliance of human rights in Canada?

Human Rights
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Conservative

Rob Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, this party and this government support human rights. We support human rights in Canada and we support human rights throughout the world.

Human Rights
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Wayne Marston Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased with the member's words, but we heard the same thing from the Liberals before and did not get any action then.

On a related matter, four years ago, after many years of debate, the UN General Assembly adopted a new treaty to prevent and eradicate torture and ill-treatment worldwide. Sixteen countries have signed on to that protocol. Sadly, Canada is not one of them.

The protocol needs 20 signatories before it comes into force. Will the minister stand today and make a commitment to Canadians that we will sign the optional protocol on torture? Will the government take the step from words to action and take a leading role in preventing torture--

Human Rights
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Human Rights
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Mr. Speaker, Canada has been very strong in asserting human rights values, both at the United Nations and around the world. We will always continue an abiding interest in ensuring that our human rights are on par with other countries. The United Nations is the best forum in which this debate is to take place. There is significant reform activity going on at the United Nations in which Canada has shown a long and abiding interest.

This type of activity is going to elevate and Canada is going to continue to play the leading role, which it has always played, on issues pertaining to human rights.

The Environment
Oral Questions

May 19th, 2006 / 11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Lloyd St. Amand Brant, ON

Mr. Speaker, for another week the COP meeting will continue in Bonn without its chair. Instead of fulfilling international obligations, the Minister of the Environment chooses to recite absurd lines from an American right wing pollster. Now it looks like she and the Prime Minister are set to announce that Canada will sign on to Asia-Pacific 6. In Bonn the minister's nine minute speech lacked specifics and was an abdication of leadership in the fight against global warming.

After weeks of slashing successful programs, is this the only action Canada will take on global warming, following a United States public relations scheme at the expense of Kyoto?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I remind the hon. member that the critic for the environment for the Liberal Party of Canada voted against Kyoto and said things like the job losses from Kyoto ratification would affect all regions of Canada. He went on to say that an agreement was written on the back of an airplane napkin on the way to Kyoto.

Let me go on to relate what Rex Murphy said on the CBC the other day. He stated:

Canada touted its signature on the accord as being in itself a great Boy Scout badge of international and environmental do-good-ism.

We will not pay for our badges; we will earn them.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Lloyd St. Amand Brant, ON

Mr. Speaker, the minister spoke earlier today about assessments. At the end of question period today, I will table a report, an assessment, from the Climate Institute, which projects that greenhouse gas emissions from AP6 countries will more than double by 2050. It concludes that not nearly enough will be achieved by the AP6 toward meeting the global warming challenge.

Why is making the Prime Minister's friends happy being traded off for killing Kyoto and sacrificing our international reputation?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, it is unfortunate that the member does not understand what is happening on the international stage. It is exactly because the major players on climate change and global warming are in the Asia-Pacific partnership. It is why Canada would like to participate to ensure we help those countries reduce their emissions.

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, environmental groups in Nova Scotia and across the country are angry. They continue to call on the government to reverse its decision to cancel a real made in Canada approach to climate change. They say the EnerGuide for houses program has provided real, measurable, cost effective successes and the new low income program had every promise of doing the same.

We know the finance minister would sooner build prisons than houses, but why is his government axing EnerGuide and forcing low income Canadians to fend for themselves?