House of Commons Hansard #46 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was consultation.

Topics

Suicide Prevention
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Winnipeg South, MB

Mr. Speaker, in an effort to raise awareness about suicide, on March 14 five youths organized a relay and left Sydney, Nova Scotia on a trek across the country. This was the fourth annual aboriginal youth suicide prevention walk.

Yesterday they reached their destination at the parliament buildings in Victoria, B.C. Today I would like to recognize them and their remarkable commitment in raising awareness for this very tragic issue.

Too many families and way too many first nation communities continue to suffer from complex and severe problems. In a country like Canada we cannot allow this kind of tragedy to continue unabated. We must all take heed of the message that these youths are sending and do everything in our power to work together to address the difficult issue of suicide.

I send my deepest thanks to these five youths for their sincere and important efforts.

National Revenue
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Robert Bouchard Chicoutimi—Le Fjord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Quebec made a decision in the Norbourg affair in order to help swindled investors. Ottawa is not following our lead in renouncing taxes not paid by Vincent Lacroix and redistributing the money to hundreds of small investors.

The Minister of National Revenue can say that she cannot comment on this matter for reasons of confidentiality under the Income Tax Act but what she is really doing is letting the dust settle and hoping that the end of the session and the arrival of summer will calm investors.

In Chicoutimi—Le Fjord and Saguenay—Lac Saint-Jean some 370 investors lost almost $6 million in the Norbourg affair.

The citizens in my area and the population of Quebec are asking the minister to hear their demands and to announce her government's decision before the end of this session.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Lemieux Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to inform the House of two activities that will take place this summer in Glengarry—Prescott—Russell.

Three times per week between July 6 and August 17, Francoscénie will present L'écho d'un peuple, a celebration of 400 years of French history in North America and Ontario, and a major production attracting tourists from all over Ontario, Quebec and further afield.

With over 300 actors, singers, dancers and jugglers, this show is a major event for Glengarry—Prescott—Russell.

The second event I would like to highlight is the Glengarry Highland Games in Maxville. With over 60 pipe bands, highland athletes and hundreds of traditional dancers, this event has something for everyone. Almost one million people have found themselves drawn to Maxville to witness an outstanding display of highland music, dance, sports, pageantries and tradition.

This summer Glengarry--Prescott--Russell is where it is at. Venez-nous visiter!

Federal Opposition Parties
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Tina Keeper Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, there is more proof that we have been an effective opposition. The Conservatives affirmed the Liberal commitment of $41.2 billion over 10 years to strengthen Canada's public health care system.

The Public Health Agency of Canada, created by the Liberals in 2003, will be established through Bill C-5.

The Liberals had an agreement with the Farmer Rail Car Coalition with regard to the hopper car fleet. Under the Conservative government it got nothing.

We effectively exposed the environment's lack of leadership at the UN Conference of Parties to the Kyoto Accord. We revealed that the U.S. had ceased to fund the Asia-Pacific partnership, the Conservatives' alternative to Kyoto. One-third of its funding is now gone.

We successfully amended the throne speech which illustrates how we can work cooperatively to ensure that the policies and actions of the government better reflect Canadian values.

The Liberals reached historic early learning and child care funding agreements with the provinces. The Conservatives terminated them.

Sri Lanka
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, Canada has been monitoring events in Sri Lanka closely and is concerned with the recent escalation of violence in the country and its troubling impact on the peace process. It is important that the Government of Sri Lanka now shows leadership and fosters a climate of trust where the peace process can move forward.

We are concerned that paramilitary groups are being used to disturb the peace process and call upon both the Sri Lankan government and the LTTE to ensure that these paramilitary groups are dismantled and that they both return to peace talks as quickly as possible. We commend Norway for its efforts.

Canada commits unwaveringly to help advance the peace process.

Breton House
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Tony Martin Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to Breton House in Sault Ste. Marie as it celebrates its 20th anniversary in bringing addiction recovery services to women and their loved ones.

Addiction services for women were hard to find back when Breton House opened its doors. A small group of women in recovery saw the need for a home where women could get help to recover from chemical dependency and support for their spiritual, physical, emotional and intellectual growth.

Its residential and community programs help women in recovery deal with their fear over losing jobs, partners, children, their health and even their lives. Women in recovery learn respect for themselves and can discover hope once again.

I salute the work done by the 10 women on staff and the board of directors at Breton House. They transform lives and make our community a better place to live.

Liberal Party of Canada
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal Party promised to be an effective and responsible opposition and the promise has been kept.

We demanded that the government provide direct relief to Canadian students unable to pay to continue their education.

We proved that the government's transit plan would cost $2,000 per tonne of CO2 reductions while the Liberal EnerGuide program, an excellent program, would cost only $200 per tonne.

The Liberals worked tirelessly to find a durable and fair resolution to the longstanding softwood lumber dispute with the United States. What did the Conservatives do? They produced a sellout framework deal that capitulates to the powerful U.S. lumber lobby and seems to be unravelling without provincial or industry support.

We also announced the launch of a free trade negotiation with South Korea.

Finally, and my favourite, we helped the confused Conservative government to understand that changing a tax rate from 15% to 15.5% is an increase, not a decrease.

St. Jean Baptiste Day
Statements By Members

June 22nd, 2006 / 2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Luc Harvey Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, June 24 is St. Jean Baptiste Day, a day to celebrate the cultural pride and rich heritage of francophones in every region of Canada. Colourful parades and lively celebrations will be held throughout the country in recognition of French Canadian culture.

St. Jean Baptiste festivities combine ancient rites performed during the summer solstice—a time of light and hope—and the traditional celebration of this day to honour the patron saint of French Canadians.

Let this serve as an opportunity to get to know our neighbours better and to learn more about our country. Together, we can express how proud we are to belong to such a dynamic, diverse society, which has become the envy of the rest of the world.

Francophones and francophiles, please join the celebration and learn more about the culture of French-speaking Canadians and their contribution to Canadian society.

Quebec National Holiday
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Louise Thibault Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am extremely delighted to rise to deliver a message to all Quebeckers on this day, our Fête nationale du Québec.

This weekend, throughout Quebec, men, women and children will get together to celebrate Quebec's national holiday. There will be bonfires everywhere and we will celebrate our pride in being a nation with such an extraordinary destiny.

These festivities and celebrations will also serve as an expression of the creativity, diversity and potential we have so often manifested. The Fête nationale du Québec is an opportunity to get together and have some fun, but above all, to dream of Quebec as we would like to see it.

The Bloc Québécois would like to wish all Quebeckers a memorable fête nationale that is sovereignly in line with our aspirations.

Immigration
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would also like to highlight the work that the official opposition has done on the environment, protection of aboriginal communities and protection of Canadian art and culture.

With respect to immigration, it is important to remember that it was our government that welcomed nearly 3 million new arrivals between 1993 and 2005, citizens who are a definite asset to the country.

I would like to say a word about one of those new arrivals, Mrs. Maoua Diomande, who was forced to seek refuge in a church sanctuary in June 2005. A happy end to her story was announced yesterday, and Maoua received her freedom.

I applaud and thank the entire community of Ottawa—Vanier, and particularly Sandy Hill, for their unfailing support of Maoua. Lastly and belatedly, on behalf of my colleagues, I would like to say to Maoua: welcome to Canada.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Toronto Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, it has been almost two months now since the Prime Minister declared “peace in our time” on the softwood lumber dispute. As a result of the Prime Minister's negotiating strategy of any deal at any cost, the U.S. administration is now telling the U.S. lumber lobby that the agreement will force the Canadian forest industry to abandon the practices that the Americans do not like.

Does the Prime Minister now realize that his declaration of victory was in fact an unconditional surrender? Will he tell the House today that he will refuse to accept any agreement that threatens Canada's sovereign control over our own natural resources?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the softwood lumber discussions continue with a view of finalizing the legal text in the very near future. We are confident that legal text will do exactly what the framework agreement does, and that is protect Canadian forestry practices and provide stable access to the American market, something the previous government was unable to do for the last five years.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Toronto Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, yesterday in the House, the trade minister, with his usual chutzpah, told the House that the talks were proceeding well and that the provinces were supportive. The Americans key demand on market-based timber pricing is a complete anathema to the largest timber producing province in our country, the province from which the trade minister comes. It is difficult to see how the talks could be going much worse.

Back in January, when the Minister of International Trade solemnly pledged to the people of British Columbia that he would become the Prime Minister's “worst nightmare”, is this what both of them were thinking about?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the Leader of the Opposition has it wrong once again. The province of British Columbia is moving toward some market-based pricing for its timber, precisely one of the things we are ensuring that the final agreement protects.

It is not surprising that we would have this kind of thing coming from the Leader of the Opposition. What have we seen for the past four months? We have seen an opposition that does not have a clue on what it stands for on all the major issues. Those members are for mandatory minimum penalties for gun crimes, then they vote against it. They are for a softwood agreement, one weaker than we got, then they oppose one when we get it. They are for defence procurement, then they are against it. They do not know what their stand is on the accountability act. That is why Canadians changed the government.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Toronto Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, one thing is clear, we do not declare victory prematurely. It seems that the Prime Minister counted his chickens before they hatched. That is not what we do on this side of the House. While the Prime Minister is trying to save his sinking softwood lumber agreement, the industry needs help now.

If the Prime Minister is so sure of an agreement, why does he not immediately offer loan guarantees to the industry sectors that are suffering the most? That is what a Liberal government would do. His Minister of International Trade knows that better than anyone in this House.