House of Commons Hansard #147 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was offender.

Topics

Multiculturalism
Oral Questions

Noon

Liberal

Colleen Beaumier Brampton West, ON

Mr. Speaker, for years the Prime Minister has called for the elimination of Canada's multicultural policy and program.

In the past few months, community leaders have expressed their deep concern about the government's plans for this vital program. However, they are afraid to speak out publicly for fear their budgets will be slashed.

Once and for all, does the government truly believe the multicultural program deserves federal funding?

Multiculturalism
Oral Questions

Noon

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, that is absolutely outrageous. I had the good fortune to attend yesterday's launch of Asian heritage month here on Parliament Hill. I was joined by the Secretary of State for Multiculturalism and Canadian Identity.

The Secretary of State for Multiculturalism and Canadian Identity spoke very profoundly. He spoke very proudly of our commitment to multiculturalism and the great benefits and values that new Canadians bring to Canada.

There were also a number of people in the crowd who wondered why the Liberals brought in a $1,000 head tax on new immigrants.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

Noon

Conservative

Bradley Trost Saskatoon—Humboldt, SK

Mr. Speaker, in the 2007 budget our government committed an unprecedented $33 billion to infrastructure. The funding will be available under the infrastructure plan, which is currently being developed.

Could the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities tell the House what the government is doing right now to help communities meet their immediate infrastructure needs?

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

Noon

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the government recognizes the importance of building strong communities. While we are looking at ways of going forward and designing our new programs, I am happy to announce that we have an agreement with the provinces to top up the MRIF program to the tune of an additional $200 million. This will generate roughly $600 million in programs and projects that we will see over the coming months.

The government is getting the job done.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

Noon

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I would like to correct the record. I meant to say $1.60 not $160.

It is a great thing in the country that we have so many people learning second languages.

Business of the House
Oral Questions

May 4th, 2007 / noon

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The Chair would like to take a moment to provide some information to the House regarding the management of private member's business.

The Chair has developed the practice of reviewing bills after the replenishment of the order of precedence so the House can be alerted to bills which, at first glance, appear to involve spending and interested members can be invited to intervene in a timely fashion to present their views about the need for a royal recommendation.

In keeping with that practice, following the April 19 replenishment of the Order of Precedence with 15 new items, I can inform the House that two bills give the Chair concern as to the spending provisions they contemplate. They are: Bill C-357, An Act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (Employment Insurance Account and premium rate setting) and another Act in consequence, standing in the name of the hon. member for Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine.

The other is Bill C-362, An Act to amend the Old Age Security Act (residency requirement), standing in the name of the member for Brampton West.

I would encourage hon. members who would like to present arguments regarding the need for a royal recommendation for these bills, or any of the other bills now standing in the order of precedence, to do so at an early opportunity.

Government Response to Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to 20 petitions.

Bisphenol A (BPA) Control Act
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-439, An Act to prohibit the use of bisphenol A (BPA) in certain products and to amend the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to introduce this very important bill, the purpose of which is to ban the use of bisphenol A.

Bisphenol A is a highly toxic chemical found in many products made of hard, translucent plastic, such as water bottles and baby bottles. This chemical acts like the hormone estrogen and numerous studies have linked it notably to an increased risk of infertility, breast and prostate cancer and obesity.

It is imperative that the government act to regulate this toxic substance.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Public Safety and National Security
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Prince George—Peace River
B.C.

Conservative

Jay Hill Secretary of State and Chief Government Whip

Mr. Speaker, there have been discussions among all the parties and I think you would find there is unanimous consent for the following motion. I move:

That twelve members of the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security be authorized to travel to the Institut national de recherche scientifique, University of Quebec in Laval, Quebec, on Thursday, May 10, and that the necessary staff accompany the Committee.

Public Safety and National Security
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Is that agreed?

Public Safety and National Security
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Public Safety and National Security
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Prince George—Peace River
B.C.

Conservative

Jay Hill Secretary of State and Chief Government Whip

(Motion agreed to)

(Bill C-22. On the Order: Government Orders:)

May 4, 2007—Minister of Justice—Third reading of Bill C-22, an act to amend the Criminal Code (age of protection) and to make consequential amendments to the Criminal Records Act.

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, there have been discussions among the various parties and I believe you would find unanimous consent for the following. I move:

That, notwithstanding any order or usual practices of the House, Bill C-22, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (age of protection) and to make consequential amendments to the Criminal Records Act, be deemed adopted at third reading on division.

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Is that agreed?