House of Commons Hansard #147 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was offender.

Topics

Second Language Education
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Andy Scott Fredericton, NB

Mr. Speaker, I wish to congratulate the University of New Brunswick on the expansion of the National Second Language Research Institute. I would like to acknowledge the Department of Canadian Heritage for providing $1.7 million to this initiative and to UNB for providing matching funds.

As a national research centre, it will conduct, publish and circulate research, scholarship and creative work in second language education and provide expert advice to a variety of partners.

New Brunswick is the only officially bilingual province in Canada. In my riding the numbers of students pursuing second language education is constantly increasing and is a source of great pride.

This expansion is consistent with the official languages plan, “The Next Act: New Momentum for Canada's Linguistic Duality”, established in 2003.

Professor Sally Rehorick and I have worked together on this project since its inception.

Congratulations to her and to the University of New Brunswick.

Automobile Industry
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Colin Carrie Oshawa, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian auto industry is alive and well. One month after budget 2007, the Canadian auto industry has smashed its sales records for April. This is not a surprise. Since taking office, Canada's new government has been creating the right economic conditions to support a strong auto industry here in Canada.

Budget 2007 empowered the Canadian auto manufacturers to be more competitive today. It provided millions to complete the Windsor-Detroit crossing; funding for research and development through the centres of excellence; tax incentives to get older polluting vehicles off the road; meaningful tax incentives to purchase environmentally friendly vehicles, like the Oshawa built E85 Impala; and finally, a two year writeoff for investments in machinery and equipment.

The only thing that is left to determine is why the NDP and the Liberals voted against the budget, voted against auto jobs, against the auto industry and even voted against the recommendations of their own industry critics.

Our government is the only party firmly committed to improving Canada's auto sector. We are getting the job done.

Gatineau Cultural Centre
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Richard Nadeau Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, on April 27, the Maison de la culture de Gatineau celebrated its 15th anniversary with a show called “15 years of ovations, 15 years of emotions”. Boom Desjardins, Ariane Gauthier, Luce Dufault, Marie-Élaine Thibert, France Maisonneuve and Ricky Paquette wowed the crowd. In the past 15 years, the cultural centre has showcased artists from all over Quebec and around the world.

To mark the anniversary, the lobby of the Salle Odyssée was adorned with a human-face mosaic made up of 6,500 photographs. Created by Jean René and Marie Hélène Giguère, the work includes the faces of audience members, employees, Quebec artists and foreign artists.

The Bloc Québécois and I would like to congratulate the Maison de la culture de Gatineau, its chair, Maurice Groulx, and its executive and artistic director, Julie Carrière.

B.C. Flood Mitigation Program
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

James Moore Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, there is a risk of severe flooding this spring in British Columbia. Due to a massive snowpack in the mountains, serious concern exists that a warm weather spell could result in a quick melt, a major swelling of the Fraser River, and flooding that would threaten the homes of thousands of British Columbians, including many of my constituents in Port Coquitlam.

Our Conservative government is taking action to protect the safety, property and livelihood of British Columbians. I am pleased to report to this House and to my constituents that our government is working with the government of British Columbia by providing $16.5 million toward the flood mitigation program announced by Premier Gordon Campbell.

We are also providing $4 million for the long overdue dredging of the Fraser River. Dredging eases the threat of flooding by helping remove some of the over two million cubic metres of sediment that settle in the Fraser every spring.

Our Conservative government is doing all we can to ensure that those homes and businesses in Port Coquitlam, Coquitlam and all the communities along the Fraser are protected from a potentially devastating flood this spring.

We are delivering real results for British Columbia, as we promised to do.

Security and Prosperity Partnership
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Brown Oakville, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw the attention of the House to the security and prosperity partnership. This partnership was initiated in 2005 by the governments of Canada, the United States and Mexico to increase cooperation and commerce within North America, but it is not a signed treaty and has never been brought before the legislatures of North America for discussion or committee oversight.

Its implementation has now been handed over to 10 corporate CEOs from each country who meet behind closed doors with senior civil servants and military personnel. They are not recommending new legislation, but are focusing on changes to regulations. This precludes the participation of legislators and therefore leaves out the people of Canada.

We, the elected representatives of the Canadian people, need to assert democratic control over this effort and ensure that it is fully transparent and in the interest of all Canadians, not just an economically powerful few.

Liberal Party Candidates
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre, SK

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal leader's desperate search for friends has again ended badly.

First his campaign organizer, Farhan Chak, sympathizes with suicide bombers and accuses Israel of rape and murder. Next, his candidate, Elizabeth May, makes Nazi references to score cheap political points.

Now, star recruit, David Orchard, has again implied that the Liberal leader, as a cabinet minister, was complicit in the commission of war crimes. In a 1999 article, Orchard suggested that Canada committed war crimes in Kosovo. Who was in cabinet during that time? The Liberal leader. Last Sunday in the Halifax Herald, Orchard wrote that Canadian activity in Afghanistan is “a supreme international crime”. Who was in cabinet when that involvement was authorized? The Liberal leader.

With friends like these, the Liberal leader does not need enemies.

Will he do the right thing, stand up for himself, his country and our troops, condemn David Orchard's remarks and kick Mr. Orchard out of the Liberal Party?

Housing
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Jean Crowder Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, Providence Farm completed a housing need and demand study for the Cowichan Valley. The study demonstrates the clear need for consistent long term planning to address the issue of homelessness.

A greater proportion of lone parent families than the rest of the province and a rapidly growing seniors population will strain the available resources for affordable housing. I was astonished to learn that for every 100 people over the age of 65 in the Cowichan Valley in 2001, there will be 230 in 2031.

Median housing prices jumped from $180,000 in 2001 to over $240,000 in 2005. Half of all families in the Cowichan Valley cannot afford to buy a house worth more than $150,000, yet in early 2006 only eight single family houses sold for under this price. The vacancy rate fell from 8.4% in October 2003 to 1.6% in October 2005, indicating growing rental demand.

There are many challenges for housing and homelessness and there are many solutions required.

I want to thank the staff at Providence Farm for their hard work on this very important issue.

Canadian Tulip Festival
Statements By Members

May 4th, 2007 / 11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speak, the sun is shining in the capital, flowers are in bloom and the Canadian Tulip Festival's Tulip Ball this evening at the National Gallery will kick off two weeks of festivities.

This year, the festival is bringing fresh, new ideas to the fore. A celebration of ideas called “Celebridée” will bring together notable guests from across Canada and around the world who will showcase the intellectual vitality of Canada's capital.

The Canadian Tulip Festival will again stand out as one of the highlights of the national capital's social calendar.

As we welcome to our capital visitors from everywhere around the world but mostly from North America, let us wish the festival organizers and sponsors much success, and above all, pleasant weather throughout the entire festival, contrary to the last two, three or four years.

I take this opportunity to congratulate all the organizers and sponsors, and in particular Teri Kirk, festival president, David Luxton, Christine Charette, Pam and Grant Hooker, and the hundreds of volunteers who will ensure its success.

May we all visit the festival.

Yvon Lessard
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Robert Bouchard Chicoutimi—Le Fjord, QC

Mr. Speaker, Yvon Lessard, of Service Électronique Professionnel in Chicoutimi has discovered a method for measuring ice on Hydro-Québec's power lines and minimizing the effects of frost on towers by working with Équipe Fabconcept in Chicoutimi.

Hydro-Québec hired Mr. Lessard for his electrical genius in order to develop a measuring device that could indicate the weight of power lines in real time when ice accumulates. Measurements can even be taken in the most difficult to access areas in the province.

With the information provided by the electronic reading equipment, Hydro-Québec will be able to activate the heating wires remotely, which will melt the ice and prevent the towers from collapsing.

I would like to congratulate Yvon Lessard for his work with Équipe Fabconcept, which enabled him to innovate and to give a positive boost to the Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean area.

Bisphenol A
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, I will be introducing a bill today in this House, calling on the government to ban a very toxic chemical substance used in many food and drink containers.

Bisphenol A is a substance found in many items made of clear, hard plastic, such as water bottles and baby bottles. The effect of this chemical is similar to that of estrogens on the human body. Many studies have shown that it increases the risk of infertility, obesity, breast and prostate cancers, and has many other harmful effects on our health. It is crucial that the government regulate the use of this toxic substance.

Liberal Party Candidates
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

David Sweet Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, first Jim Curran, the Liberal nominee in Niagara Falls withdrew his candidacy because he was arrested on fraud charges. Then we learn of Farhan Chak, who has finally resigned his candidacy in Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont.

The real question is why the Liberal leader is so weak that he would not fire Chak outright. We told him about Chak's intemperate views about Israel. We told him about Chak's sympathy toward suicide bombers. We told him about Chak's conspiracy theories about terrorist attacks. It was left to us to tell him about Chak's weapons charges related to a nightclub shooting.

Apparently, Chak did not think it was a big deal. Nor did the Liberal leader because he still did not see fit to fire Chak. It was Chak who realized he was not fit to stand for election.

The Liberal leader should grow a backbone. He would not stand up to Farhan Chak. Will he at least stand up to Elizabeth May and ask her to resign her candidacy in Central Nova?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, we now have proof from a colonel in the Canadian Forces that a detainee handed over by Canadian soldiers to Afghan authorities was beaten. We now have the evidence that what the government repeatedly said was false.

Why did it take a Federal Court case to prove that these allegations of abuse are real, rather than baseless Taliban allegations, as the government has so often claimed?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, the case the member for Westmount—Ville-Marie speaks of is actually a good story for the Canadian military. It is a case where the military saw some treatment, some roughhousing of an individual, and stepped in immediately to put an end to it. That is how things should work. That shows that things were working well in the field.

The agreement that we have in place now has received very good reviews, no less than The Globe and Mail where it says in the editorial today:

It is a very good agreement, equal to those obtained by the governments of Britain and the Netherlands in most ways, and superior in two significant ways--

I would be happy to go on further.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Federal Court had to intervene to expose this government's cover-up. When informed of the treatment of a prisoner that they had just transferred to the Afghan police, Canadian troops in Kandahar had to ask that the prisoner be returned to them.

Why did the Minister of National Defence and five other ministers of this government rise in the House over a two-week period and tell Canadians that there was not a problem, when we now have proof to the contrary?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, in the case in question, obviously the Canadian Forces were able to take action quickly to ensure that there was nothing improper allowed to continue. In fact, that is exactly what our new agreement ensures will continue to be the case.

I will read from it because I know I invited opposition members to do that yesterday and apparently they are not interested in what we have done. It states:

Representatives of the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission and the Canadian Government personnel, including representatives of the Canadian Embassy in Kabul and others empowered to represent the Government of Canada will have full and unrestricted access to any persons transferred by the Canadian Forces to Afghan authorities while such persons are in custody. In addition to the International Committee of the Red Cross, relevant human rights institutions with--