House of Commons Hansard #45 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was industry.

Topics

2 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

It being Wednesday, we will now have the singing of the national anthem, led by the hon. member for Sackville—Eastern Shore.

[Members sang the national anthem]

Snowbirds
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Ray Boughen Palliser, SK

Mr. Speaker, on Friday, May 7, the Canadian Snowbirds kicked off their 40th show season with yet another incredible acceptance show. Before they did, however, the Snowbirds made history by making Lieutenant Colonel Maryse Carmichael the first female commander of this great Canadian institution.

The Snowbirds could not have made a better choice than Lieutenant Colonel Carmichael. Having served our country in many Canadian cities in a number of roles, her return to Moose Jaw is a kind of homecoming.

In 1994, Lieutenant Colonel Carmichael received her wings at 15 Wing in Moose Jaw and she became an instructor. In 2000, she became the first female pilot to fly with the team. Now she returns to achieve yet another first.

I will take this opportunity to wish the Snowbirds the very best in this their 40th year and I ask my colleagues to help me congratulate Lieutenant Colonel Maryse Carmichael on becoming the Snowbirds' first ever female commander.

Canada Health Day
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, we celebrate Canada Health Day on May 12, which is also Florence Nightingale's birthday. She was an inspiration and an example for health professionals around the world.

She defended good hygiene practices such as handwashing and improved sanitation in health care facilities.

She launched social and health care reforms in England and abroad. She performed statistically based research and used innovative pie charts to illustrate her data. Her life as a statistician identifying patterns and causes of infectious disease goes beyond her reputation as the compassionate lady with the lamp.

On this Canada Health Day, let us honour Florence's legacy by championing a sustainable health care system, promoting more health, less health care, good data, accountability for results and preventing the preventable.

Maison Michel-Sarrazin
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Pascal-Pierre Paillé Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to highlight the 25th anniversary of an institution that is known throughout Quebec, the Maison Michel-Sarrazin. Established as the first francophone palliative care hospice, the Maison Michel-Sarrazin is dedicated to improving the quality of life for those in the palliative and terminal stage of cancer. It also offers support to their loved ones.

Let us take a moment to consider the tremendous work of the directors, employees and volunteers at Maison Michel-Sarrazin. By offering help and support, they give strength to those who are touched by disease. The hospice offers care and support throughout a time of great difficulty.

My Bloc Québécois colleagues and I pay tribute to the work of all these hospices and nursing homes. Congratulations on their 25th anniversary, Maison Michel-Sarrazin.

Asbestos
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, asbestos is the greatest industrial killer that the world has ever known. In fact, more Canadians die from asbestos than from all other industrial and occupational causes combined.

Yet, Canada remains one of the largest producers and exporters of asbestos in the world. In fact, Canada not only produces a great deal of asbestos, we spend millions of dollars subsidizing the asbestos industry and sending teams of Department of Justice lawyers around the world trying to block other countries' efforts to curb its use.

Today, members of the building trade unions, CAW, the Canadian Labour Congress, Health and Welfare and occupational health professionals gathered on Parliament Hill to send a message to the Government of Canada that we should ban asbestos in all its forms and institute a just transition program for asbestos workers who may be affected, that we should end all government subsidies of asbestos, both in Canada and abroad, and that we should stop blocking international conventions designed to curb its use, such as the Rotterdam Convention.

Diabetes
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Greg Rickford Kenora, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the pleasure to rise in the House today to celebrate the remarkable achievement of an impressive young lady who really does put the “great” in the great Kenora riding.

I met Sarah Macdonald last year at the Kenora home show where she was busy fundraising on behalf of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation's Walk to a Cure.

Sarah has type 1 diabetes and must use her insulin pump every day. In a letter to me, she said, “it's hard to imagine my life without diabetes, but it would be so awesome not to worry about any long-term complications like kidney failure, blindness, heart attack and stroke”.

That is why Sarah walks for the research foundation, and she has raised over $30,000 in the past five years with Team Sarah Macdonald. Because of her long history of participation, many of the organizers know Sarah by name and will shout out, “Hey, there's Sarah from Kenora”.

Today I encourage Canadians and all members of the House to be inspired by the tremendous dedication of Sarah from Kenora.

National Nursing Week
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, since 1910, the Community Nursing Registry of Ottawa has been providing nursing care in the community, as well as acute care and in long-term care facilities. I am honoured to acknowledge its ongoing outstanding contribution to our community as it celebrates its centennial year.

I would also like to recognize that this week is National Nursing Week, a wonderful opportunity to celebrate Canadian nurses for their outstanding patient-centred care and dedication to improving and advancing the health care system.

This year's theme: Nursing: You can't live without it, reflects the immense value of Canada's largest group of health care providers.

As the proud son of a registered nurse, I encourage all members to join me in thanking Canada's nurses for their knowledge, skills, compassion and dedication and helping keep individuals, families and communities healthy and for caring for us when we are ill.

Whether they are nursing students, new graduates, mid-career nurses or celebrating more than 30 years of service, Canadians need them more than ever and we can never thank them enough.

Rail Transportation
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Cheryl Gallant Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, all aboard for rural Ontario.

Rail service is a vital transportation link that is an environmentally responsible means to assist in the maintenance and development of rural communities and is an economical way to ship and receive goods over long distances.

Opposition MPs from northern Ontario voted against the $9.2 million for rail and passenger service to Algoma central and Ontario northland in the last federal budget. That sounds like the controversial long gun registry where opposition MPs say one thing in their riding and do something different when ordered by their Toronto-based leaders.

Our Conservative government supports rail. I thank all municipalities who passed resolutions supporting rail in eastern Ontario. I ask everyone to speak up for the environment and rural Ontario.

Community Resource Centre
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Claude DeBellefeuille Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, today I am very proud to pay tribute to the Carrefour du partage community resource centre, which was named the community voluntary organization of the year on May 1 at the 31st Salaberry-de-Valleyfield Chamber of Commerce gala.

This honour is well deserved as Carrefour du partage is celebrating its 40th anniversary. It is a meeting place, a place to exchange ideas and to learn for low-income and socially isolated families. Created by nine religious communities in 1969, this organization has been run for a number of years by only one nun and many lay people who are just as passionate.

I congratulate all the pioneers, volunteers and community partners who, year after year, work to make the Carrefour du partage a reliable, indispensable and welcoming resource for the families of Salaberry-de-Valleyfield.

I would also like to point out the dedication of the workers as well as their professionalism in dealing with families. I tip my hat to the ladies. I hope that they are able to carry out their plan for new premises. Long live Carrefour du partage.

Spinal Cord Injuries
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Candice Bergen Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, today, I participated in the Canadian Paraplegic Association's Chair-Leaders event on Parliament Hill in recognition of Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month.

Participating MPs have spent part or all of their day in a wheelchair facing some of the same challenges a person with a spinal cord injury faces every day.

My colleague and good friend, the Minister of State for Democratic Reform, who is co-hosting today's event, is a perfect example of a person who is faced with these obstacles. His tenacity, dedication and accomplishments are an inspiration to me and to all of us.

The CPA was founded in 1945 by veterans who arrived back in Canada after fighting in the second world war. For 65 years now, the CPA has provided support to Canadians with a spinal cord injury.

Let us all continue to work together to support and advocate for Canadians with disabilities so that they can fully participate in Canadian society.

Spinal Cord Injuries
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Michael Savage Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, this year marks the 65th anniversary of the Canadian Paraplegic Association.

The CPA has offered important, meaningful service and support to more than 100,000 Canadians who have adjusted to a new way of life.

I am honoured to co-host, for the third year running, CPA's Chair-Leaders Day, a day when many of my colleagues in both Houses will spend their day in a wheelchair to get a small glimpse into the lives of those who are physically disabled.

Today, three Canadians will suffer a spinal cord injury; that translates to about 1,200 new spinal cord injuries each year. Many of these new cases are the result of a car accident, sports injury or other unintended accidents.

I want to acknowledge the work of my friend, Ron Swan, who is the chair of the board of directors for the CPA of Nova Scotia. I am always inspired by his work and tireless effort to make persons with physical disabilities feel comfortable in their community.

Two years ago, I was the lone MP on the Hill in a wheelchair. Today, we have 20 parliamentarians taking part in this event. I consider it an honour to be part of this day and I commend the CPA on its fantastic work to allow persons with disabilities to be full and active participants in our country.

Eliminating Pardons for Serious Crimes
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Tilly O'Neill-Gordon Miramichi, NB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday legislation was tabled in the House to ensure that sexual offenders against children do not receive pardons.

As the Minister of Public Safety said, “These changes are tough, yet they're fair. And they're in line with the expectations of Canadians”.

This legislation is a step in the right direction. Canadians agree and victims' advocates agree.

It is too bad the opposition members are not listening. Here is what they had to say yesterday. The Liberals want to hear from the experts. The Bloc members are concerned about stigmatizing rapists. The NDP members say they oppose the principles behind the bill.

The opposition parties need to stop playing games and start listening to Canadians. We call on the opposition parties to side with victims and law-abiding Canadians, not criminals.

Homelessness
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, homelessness plagues cities everywhere and Edmonton is no exception.

In 1999 a count in Edmonton revealed over 1,100 homeless. By 2008 that number swelled to over 3,000.

Val Stevens did not accept this. A local author, she won an award two years ago for a story on changing public perceptions of homeless people.

My Home Street Home follows a woman who suffers a string of unfortunate circumstances, leaving her homeless. It is based on the lives of less fortunate Edmontonians whom Ms. Stevens met on walks in the river valley, downtown and through my riding. Val Stevens showed the remarkable resilience of women facing tremendous challenges and gave them a voice.

Sadly, Val Stevens died suddenly a year ago. Her family has relaunched Val's book to continue her campaign. Proceeds from the sale of the book will be donated to the Mustard Seed Church and Hope Mission.

I encourage colleagues to support the campaign, read Home My Street Home and support Val Stevens' efforts to address homelessness in Canada.

Justice
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Daniel Petit Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc's votes in this House have made it clear that they do not care about victims' rights. Yesterday afternoon, the Bloc leader made his indifference towards victims of serious crime very clear.

Speaking with reporters on May 11, the Bloc leader said that, “with sexual assault, for example, it can be very important, or much less so when committed by a young person.”

How can a party leader say such things and trivialize a crime as violent as sexual assault against women or children? How can the Bloc leader try to reason that a sex crime is less serious if the offender is young?

It is clear that the Bloc leader does not support Quebec women and children who have been the victims of sexual assault.

New Book on Sovereignty
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Nicolas Dufour Repentigny, QC

Mr. Speaker, today I want to acknowledge the release of the book Souveraineté: nouvelle génération by the Forum jeunesse du Bloc québécois. Twenty years after the failure of the Meech Lake accord, young people throughout Quebec have expressed what sovereignty means to them. These young people between the ages of 16 and 30 represent the passion and creativity of my generation.

Once again, I am proud to recognize the maturity of the new generation of Quebec separatists, who defend Quebec's independence with talent and rigour. With this book, these young Quebeckers are clearly showing that the next generation of separatists is alive and well.

It is often said that the culture of a people is expressed through its youth. The nation of Quebec can be proud of this group of young people who, through their words, are contributing to making Quebec a country.

On behalf of myself and all the hon. members from the Bloc Québécois, I want to express my heartfelt congratulations to those who contributed to the book Souveraineté: nouvelle génération, and I encourage them to continue their activism.