House of Commons Hansard #45 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was industry.

Topics

Ethics
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, over a month ago now, the Prime Minister informed Canadians that he had tossed the status of women minister out of cabinet and the Conservative caucus.

He also asked the RCMP and the Ethics Commissioner to investigate. One month later, Canadians still do not know why.

A lot has happened since then, but we still do not know the nature of these allegations, deemed so serious that the Prime Minister needed to call in the RCMP on a sitting cabinet minister for the first time since the days of Brian Mulroney.

It was not enough that the minister violated security regulations in an airport or that members of her staff passed themselves off as members of the public and wrote letters in support of her, or that her husband was making deals and conducting personal business in her office. All this time, the Prime Minister kept telling us that she was doing very good work.

Then overnight, he called in the RCMP. These are questions that have to do with the integrity of the government. It is time to end the culture of deceit. The question is simple: When will the government come clean with Canadians?

Eliminating Pardons for Serious Crimes
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Cathy McLeod Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the eliminating pardons for serious crimes bill was introduced in the House. Already this important piece of legislation is receiving overwhelming support from Canadians and victims' advocates.

Sheldon Kennedy said that the whole process was “about finding a balance and being able to switch the roles of victims not being the ones that are punished. This has been put together, yes, quickly but with a lot of thought”.

This is what Theo Fleury had to say, “I think it's just important that we've taken a step that probably needed to happen a long time ago”.

Canadians want a justice system that puts the rights of victims and law-abiding citizens ahead of the rights of criminals. Our government is taking action, and we call on the opposition to support speedy passage of this urgently needed legislation at all stages.

Offshore Drilling
Oral Questions

May 12th, 2010 / 2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, for days the government has hidden behind PMO talking points when asked to produce an environmental disaster plan for drilling in highly sensitive areas like the Beaufort Sea. In fact, last December it handed over responsibility for safety and environmental protection to the oil companies themselves.

Why is the government hiding the fact that it deliberately weakened our offshore drilling regulations?

Offshore Drilling
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, nothing could be further from the truth. The health and safety of Canadians remains the Government of Canada's top priority.

There are currently no active authorizations for drilling of any kind in the Beaufort Sea. The National Energy Board has announced that it will conduct a comprehensive review of Arctic safety and the environmental requirements for offshore drilling. This new process will be open and transparent and will include opportunities for the public to get involved.

The National Energy Board has also cancelled its written hearing on the same-season relief well capability.

Offshore Drilling
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

More PMO talking points, Mr. Speaker.

The Minister of the Environment claims to be outraged and horrified by what is happening in the Gulf of Mexico. Canadians, for their part, are outraged and horrified by this government's inability to come up with a plan to prevent such a disaster from happening off Canada's coastline. On Tuesday, the National Energy Board cancelled hearings about the requirement to drill a relief well in case of a spill in Arctic waters.

Why does the government not care about this?

Offshore Drilling
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, how can that party be credible? The Liberal leader said the opposite of what is in that party's press release.

Just to be clear, we are talking about an independent body, the National Energy Board, that reviews all of the regulations that apply to oceans. In the Beaufort Sea, the general rules do not allow drilling permits to be issued. In addition, there will be an open and transparent process for the public. I want to make it clear that the board will hold any necessary hearings. Let us have no more of their foolish politicizing.

Offshore Drilling
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, one thing is clear. The Conservative government has been grossly negligent in its lack of preparation in the event of an Arctic oil spill. It is even forging ahead with plans for oil exploration in Lancaster Sound mere months after taking steps to declare it a national marine conservation area.

Apparently the Conservatives have no idea that there is no technology to clean up an oil spill under the ice. They have no policy on relief well capacity either.

Why has the government been so negligent when it comes to protecting our offshore and our environment?

Offshore Drilling
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, let me explain what is preposterous.

First, the facts are clear. There have been no licenses issued for drilling of deep wells in the Beaufort Sea. In contrast, the Liberals yesterday issued a press release calling for a moratorium. Then their leader went on national television and said, “Well, maybe a moratorium, but not necessarily”.

Perhaps what we need is a moratorium on disorganization on the part of the Liberals.

Offshore Drilling
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Vancouver South, BC

Mr. Speaker, for us on the west coast the Exxon Valdez was a devastating experience. We now see an environmental catastrophe happening in the Gulf of Mexico.

That is why the 1972 moratorium on offshore drilling and a tanker ban on the west coast, imposed by Pierre Trudeau, are so important for the west coast of Canada.

Does the government support the 1972 Trudeau moratorium on offshore drilling and the tanker ban on the west coast, yes or no?

Offshore Drilling
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, let me be very direct with our friend from British Columbia. The government has no plans to reopen the 1988 exclusion zone that is in place for tankers travelling between Alaska and Washington state. Under this long-standing agreement, U.S. tanker ships are not allowed within 25 to 30 miles of the B.C. coast.

We support that. That is something that is tremendously important not just for people in British Columbia, but for all Canadians.

Offshore Drilling
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Vancouver South, BC

Mr. Speaker, the question I asked was about the 1972 moratorium. It is the 1972 moratorium. It was the Exxon Valdez and now it is the Gulf of Mexico.

Under the circumstances there is absolutely no guaranteeing safety on the west coast in terms of offshore drilling or tanker traffic. That is why the 1972 Trudeau moratorium is absolutely important for British Columbia and for Canada.

Do the Conservatives support the Trudeau moratorium of 1972 on offshore drilling and the 1972 tanker ban on the B.C. coast?

Offshore Drilling
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we cannot be any clearer. Thanks to the leadership of a Conservative government, in 1988 there was an exclusion zone. That is tremendously important not just to people in British Columbia but to all Canadians, and this government has no plans to reopen this. That is important and those are the facts. The scaremongering of the member opposite will not change that.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is meeting today with the Secretary-General of the United Nations, Ban Ki-moon. We know that one of the objectives of the meeting is to lobby for a seat for Canada on the UN Security Council. But since it came to power, the Conservative government has been at odds with a number of UN positions.

How can the Prime Minister aspire to sit on the UN Security Council when he still has not signed the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, on the contrary, as the Secretary-General has recognized, Canada is one of the largest donors and contributors to UN activities on security, human rights, development, responsibility and accountability. Canada's role within the United Nations is very important to our sovereign country.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, last fall, the Prime Minister did not even deign to speak at the UN climate change summit, even though a number of world leaders did, including President Obama.

How can the Prime Minister aspire to sit on the UN Security Council when he has not taken any real action on climate change and he has even questioned its existence?