House of Commons Hansard #45 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was industry.

Topics

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, again, what I have here in my hand is an article called “End the Inquisition”. It comes from a respected former member of the Department of Foreign Affairs. It outlines all of the myths, many of which members of the opposition have partaken in over the past number of months. One of the more telling passages from this article says:

In contrast, the committee has heard many hours of testimony from military commanders, ambassadors, and senior officials refuting allegations Canada delivered detainees over for torture.

We can play the partisan game here all day. These are people who know. These are people who have been involved and are listening.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Jack Harris St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, the evidence is piling up and so are the legitimate concerns.

Brigadier-General Laroche said yesterday that the firing of the Afghan secret police head confirmed the allegations of torture made by a Canadian-transferred detainee on November 5, 2007. Why does the government continue to bury its head in the sand, refuse to admit that the detainee transfer record is a complete mess? It needs to listen to this general and to the courageous diplomats who have made similar claims.

When will the government admit its mistakes and call a public inquiry?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the evidence is piling up. We have heard from a number of generals who were there during the time in question. We have heard from numerous witnesses who were there, who worked for the Department of Foreign Affairs, who worked for public safety.

Here is a retired general, an individual by the name of General Hillier, who said:

We didn't base it on hearsay, hypothesis, or second-hand information. We didn't base it on Taliban detainees saying things without corroborating evidence.

The evidence is definitely piling up. The member is a former lawyer. Maybe he is still practising. He should listen to the evidence and come to a different conclusion.

Justice
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Steven Blaney Lévis—Bellechasse, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians, victims and the members of our government were deeply shocked by the pardon granted to convicted sex offender Graham James.

This shows that we have to act to prevent such an outrage from happening again and to ensure that our justice system remains credible.

Our Conservative government is taking action by introducing legislation to eliminate automatic pardons for serious crimes.

Can the Minister of Public Safety tell the House how this important legislation will ensure that the rights of honest citizens like the people of Lévis—Bellechasse and Les Etchemins always take precedence over the rights of criminals?

Justice
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for that excellent question. Under the current pardon system, crimes committed are pardoned almost as though the damage done did not exist.

The vast majority of Canadians are against that, and rightly so. Our Conservative government is also against that.

These measures could eliminate pardons for people convicted of sexual assault against children, for example. In addition, the National Parole Board would have the tools it needs to ensure that our children and our communities are better protected.

The changes we are proposing are fair, and they make good sense. I hope the opposition will support them.

Sydney Harbour
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, two weeks ago my colleague, the member for Sydney—Victoria, asked a question of the minister responsible for the Atlantic gateway about the government's contribution to the Sydney harbour dredging project.

What he got in reply from the minister was vacuous. It was empty. It was like the Air Canada Centre during the NHL playoffs. And that comes from a Leafs fan.

The minister has had two weeks to prepare now. He has been able to be briefed by his staff. Will he tell us today what the government is going to do to help the people in Cape Breton with the dredging project?

Sydney Harbour
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Conservative

Keith Ashfield Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member opposite for his insightful question.

The dredging of Sydney harbour is a complex undertaking that will involve all levels of government and the private sector. Enterprise Cape Breton has been working together with Sydney Marine Group to develop this important project.

But I have to talk about the good things that are going on in Cape Breton: $6.6 million under CAF; $2.9 million under RInC, that is 41 projects; and 61 projects under ICF, worth $19.2 million.

We are doing great work and are very proud of working in Cape Breton.

The Environment
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Raynald Blais Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine, QC

Mr. Speaker, the people of the Magdalen Islands fear a major oil spill similar to the one the people of Louisiana are currently dealing with. The situation is even more worrisome given that a major drilling project off the coast of Newfoundland does not include any plans for relief wells.

The Association des pêcheurs propriétaires des Îles-de-la-Madeleine is calling for an emergency plan to deal with any major spills in order to protect the ecosystem and the way of life of the people of the Magdalen Islands.

Does the Canadian government have an emergency plan to protect the islands in the event of a spill on the scale of the one in the Gulf of Mexico?

The Environment
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, Canada has an extremely rigorous regulatory regime when it comes to the safety of offshore oil and gas activities. Canada will carefully examine all the conclusions drawn from the current disaster in the Gulf of Mexico in order to increase safety, understand more and learn as much as possible in order to perfect our system.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

May 12th, 2010 / 3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I would like to draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of His Excellency Ban Ki-moon, Secretary-General of the United Nations.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. Members

Hear, hear!

Business of the House
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Prince George—Peace River
B.C.

Conservative

Jay Hill Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, there have been discussions among all the parties and I believe you would find unanimous consent for the following motion. I move:

That, when the House begins proceedings under the provisions of Standing Order 53.1 later today, no quorum calls, requests for unanimous consent or dilatory motions shall be received by the Chair.

I think, Mr. Speaker, you would find that acceptable to the House.

Business of the House
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Does the hon. government House leader have the consent of the House to propose this motion?

Business of the House
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Business of the House
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?