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House of Commons Hansard #194 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was cmhc.

Topics

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Thornhill Ontario

Liberal

Elinor Caplan LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the member's preamble deals with a court case that dealt with AIDS.

While I am not in a position to comment on court cases, I would tell the member that our position on hepatitis C is very clear. Negotiations are ongoing at the present time for those who were infected in the blood system between 1986 and 1990.

A proposal has been made to provide ongoing lifetime care to those infected outside that window. That is because this government and the Minister of Health believe that people no matter how they were infected deserve to have the care that they need. We do not believe in cash compensation.

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Reform

Grant Hill Reform Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, this was not about AIDS at all. This was about the responsibility of the regulator of the Red Cross. I have the court case right here in front of me. It simply says that the Red Cross was responsible and the regulator was also responsible in 1983.

The 1986 date is artificial, legalistic and bogus. Why does the government not just admit it, pitch that date out and look after everybody who got tainted blood and hepatitis C?

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Thornhill Ontario

Liberal

Elinor Caplan LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the member is incorrect in the premise of his question. This government believes very clearly that there is a very distinct difference between the infection of AIDS and hepatitis C.

We have taken appropriate action. We understand this is a very serious and sensitive issue. That is why we have offered $1.1 billion. Negotiations are ongoing with those infected between 1986 and 1990.

We are hopeful of an outcome that will be put before the courts to ensure that that is approved before any final settlement is taken.

Construction ContractsOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

NDP

John Solomon NDP Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre, SK

Mr. Speaker, my question for the Minister of Public Works relates to two public projects built adjacent to the Prime Minister's private cottage in Grand'Mère, Quebec. The first one, worth $72,000, was to build an RCMP compound. The second one, worth $65,000, was to build a road. I sent the contract award records to the minister.

Could the minister confirm that these two contracts were awarded without tender to the firm Construction R. Cloutier, Inc. in violation of Treasury Board guidelines for construction contracts over $25,000, and if so, why?

Construction ContractsOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Cardigan P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay LiberalSolicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, let us get the facts straight. The Prime Minister built a new home. It is a private matter. He paid for it. Security for the Prime Minister is the responsibility of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The RCMP indicated that an additional access road was required. The contractor was already working on the property. For security reasons, he was hired under standard government guidelines.

Construction ContractsOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

NDP

John Solomon NDP Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre, SK

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's conflict of interest code requires ministers to arrange their private affairs to bear the closest public scrutiny and not to accord preferential treatment to their friends.

In view of the facts that Mr. Renald Cloutier built the Prime Minister's private cottage in Grand'Mère, is the father-in-law of the owner of the Grand'Mère Inn, and donates regularly to the Liberal Party, could the Deputy Prime Minister explain how the Prime Minister's conflict of interest code would permit the untendered awarding of these public contracts to his personal contractor, Mr. Cloutier?

Construction ContractsOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Cardigan P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay LiberalSolicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as I indicated previously, the construction of the home was a private matter. It was paid for by the Prime Minister. The construction of the road was a requirement of the RCMP. The RCMP indicated it was required for security reasons.

Young Offenders ActOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Progressive Conservative Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

Mr. Speaker, after 18 months and numerous media leaks, today's long awaited youth criminal justice act will disappoint Canadians. As before, Bill C-68 conjures up images of false hope. The bill does nothing to lower the age of accountability to 10 years. It ignores provincial demands for mandatory minimum sentences for weapons offences. The size and complexities of its clauses and subclauses will invariably lead to confusion and further backlog in the courts.

Why is the minister ignoring the advice of the provinces and her own experts and refusing to lower the age of criminal responsibility?

Young Offenders ActOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton West Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, we have dealt with this issue this afternoon.

Let me say again that this government is not going to lower the age of criminal responsibility below the age of 12. We do not believe the formal criminal justice process is the best place to deal with these young people. However, we are not suggesting that these young people should not be dealt with, should not receive help and support and that their families should not receive help and support. Consequently, that is why we think it is so important to work with the provinces to ensure that the child welfare system—

Young Offenders ActOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough.

Young Offenders ActOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Progressive Conservative Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

Mr. Speaker, refusing to do so takes away a mechanism to do what the minister would accomplish.

The Liberals have tried to please everyone with this bill and as a result, will please no one. They have tabled a piecemeal bill that is costly and confusing to implement. There is no concern of the government of course because the current funding of only 30% for the cost of enforcement falls far short of the 50% intended for enforcement.

Where is the government's commitment to restore federal funding to properly implement a truly national and equitable youth criminal justice system?

Young Offenders ActOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton West Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, let me remind the hon. member which government it was that froze funding for the provinces in 1989-90. It was the Progressive Conservative government that refused federal contributions for youth justice.

Young Offenders ActOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh.

Young Offenders ActOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

The Speaker

Order. The hon. Minister of Justice will answer the question.

Young Offenders ActOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Anne McLellan Liberal Edmonton West, AB

Mr. Speaker, let me remind the hon. House that it was in our budget three weeks ago that this government made a commitment to youth justice with 206 million new dollars.

National DefenceOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Karen Kraft Sloan Liberal York North, ON

Mr. Speaker, the widow of one of our Canadian military crew members who died in the 1998 Labrador helicopter crash is one of my constituents. She is experiencing extreme medical, psychological and financial hardship. I was wondering what is the minister going to do to address this very immediate situation?

National DefenceOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

York Centre Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton LiberalMinister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, this is a very tragic occurrence, the loss of this pilot and the other crew members in that crash. We are doing everything that is possible and will do everything that is possible.

I want to make sure we support Mrs. Musselman and the family and the families of the other crew members. There was an issue here with respect to the retention bonus and the balance of the retention bonus. I have now authorized its payment to Mrs. Musselman.

TradeOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Reform

Charlie Penson Reform Peace River, AB

Mr. Speaker, when it comes to disputes with the United States, this government has a pretty spotty record.

This government was afraid to take on the Americans when it came to salmon. It was afraid to take on the Americans when it came to softwood lumber, grain and cattle. However, it was not afraid to take the bull by the horns when it came to defending the magazine industry.

Why is the government willing to sacrifice Canadian producers of salmon, lumber and steel but it stands up for magazine publishers?

TradeOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

York West Ontario

Liberal

Sergio Marchi LiberalMinister for International Trade

Mr. Speaker, the member has it absolutely wrong. We do not accept for one moment the preamble to this question.

Canada is always prepared to stand up for itself. It regards its sovereignty and its issues of national interest as paramount. We make no apologies for being good friends and allies to the Americans, but as our Prime Minister has said often, business is business and friendship is friendship.

Elk BreedingOral Question Period

March 11th, 1999 / 2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Louis Plamondon Bloc Richelieu, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Secretary of State for Agriculture and Agri-Food.

For over two years now, Lucien Beaupré, who raises elk in Aston Junction, has been trying to obtain justice from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. The department ordered the destruction of his herd because one animal that had just been bought had tuberculosis. But Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada had twice certified the animal's health in writing.

Because Mr. Beaupré lost his livelihood by relying on the department, does the Secretary of State for Agriculture and Agri-Food not think it fair that he be adequately compensated?

Elk BreedingOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bellechasse—Etchemins—Montmagny—L'Islet Québec

Liberal

Gilbert Normand LiberalSecretary of State (Agriculture and Agri-Food)(Fisheries and Oceans)

Mr. Speaker, at the time of these events, Mr. Beaupré received compensation of $2,000 for each animal, as provided for in the act.

I have in fact been asked by the UPA to look into Mr. Beaupré's case. We are doing so now.

Young Offenders ActOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Peter Mancini NDP Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Justice.

We know that the best way to prevent crime is to work with young people, and I am glad the government agrees. But the current funding is not enough to support the present system, let alone the proposed changes.

Under this smokescreen of new legislation, the provinces will pick up the costs of probation officers, of victims' involvement in the courts, and of youth services.

How can the minister guarantee to us that the $206 million over three years will be spent properly? What guarantees are there that it is enough money to meet the requirements?

Young Offenders ActOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Edmonton West Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, all of us who are involved in the youth justice system are aware of the pressures that fiscal constraints have placed upon that system over the past number of years. That is why we are working so hard with provincial and territorial governments.

Now we have additional funds, and the member is quite right to point out that they are for the next three years. They are to implement large parts of our new legislation and build on that which the provinces and we at the federal level are already doing. We provide $143 million every year now and in fact we will be providing more money in the coming years.

The HomelessOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Diane St-Jacques Progressive Conservative Shefford, QC

Mr. Speaker, at a meeting of the Prime Minister and the mayor of Toronto yesterday to discuss matters of mutual interest, one topic raised was an action plan initiated by Mayor Lastman to address the problem of the homeless.

Does the Prime Minister intend to support this initiative and, if so, how exactly does he plan to contribute to its success?

The HomelessOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Windsor West Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray LiberalDeputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, this sort of meeting with Mayor Lastman was very productive. The mayor complimented the Prime Minister on how well the discussion went.

We will bear Mayor Lastman's comments in mind, but we have already taken significant steps to help the homeless. The problem is still high on our agenda.