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House of Commons Hansard #125 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was labour.

Topics

VolunteerismStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Conservative Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honour a great Canadian, Douglas A. Lock. He is a man with 37 years of reserve and active duty with the Canadian army, retiring with the rank of lieutenant colonel in 2000.

Furthermore, Douglas has volunteered his time with the Canadian Fallen Firefighters Foundation. This registered charity honours firefighters who have died in the line of duty and supports their families. Douglas has been a volunteer treasurer for this charity and has dedicated the past five years of his life to achieving its goals.

I find it inspiring to meet with people like Douglas Lock, who embody the spirit of dedication and service. We thank him for all he has done for his community and his country.

Female Genital MutilationStatements By Members

February 7th, 2011 / 2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Johanne Deschamps Bloc Laurentides—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, February 6 is the International Day Against Female Genital Mutilation. Every year, more than 3 million young girls are at risk of being subjected to genital mutilation, and some 500,000 of those girls live in Europe.

Women are being repressed and discriminated against in this way on the grounds of tradition and cultural symbolism. Mutilations are done in great secrecy in the worst sanitary conditions and are completely illegal. Knives, razor blades and even scissors are used for the various barbaric operations. No anesthetic is used. It is a highly traumatic experience for these young girls and unfortunately, many of them do not survive.

Let us not consider this day to be just a reminder of the fact that these inhumane practices exist; let us eradicate these practices for good. It is unacceptable in 2011 for such indignities to the female body to continue to occur.

CurlingStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Candice Bergen Conservative Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, on January 26, Altona, Manitoba played host to the 2011 Manitoba Scotties Tournament of Hearts. The event was held at the Millennium Centre, Altona's state-of-the-art recreational facility.

All week curling fans were treated to top-notch play by the 64 athletes as the crowds filled the stands to cheer on and support their teams. The well-attended tournament surpassed the expectations of organizers, but was easily managed thanks to the overwhelming support of 300 volunteers and the tireless work of co-chairs Wendy Friesen and Al Friesen.

The tournament was lauded a massive success by athletes and patrons alike who noted the first-class facilities and the warm hospitality of Altona's 3,700 local residents.

Over 1,000 people attended Sunday's finale, which saw Team Cathy Overton-Clapham emerge as tournament champions.

Congratulations and best of luck to the ladies as they represent Manitoba at the 2011 National Scotties Tournament of Hearts.

Ernie RegehrStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Bernard Patry Liberal Pierrefonds—Dollard, QC

Mr. Speaker, on January 21, I had the honour and privilege of attending the ceremony in which His Excellency the Governor General of Canada presented the Pearson Peace Medal to Ernie Regehr.

Originally from Waterloo, Ontario, Mr. Regehr is a prominent figure and respected the world over for his voice on disarmament and arms control in general, human security and peace.

Canadian and foreign governments as well as the United Nations regularly rely upon his expertise, judgment and balanced views on these issues.

On behalf of all members of this House, I wish to offer our warmest congratulations on receiving this medal and our sincere thanks to an exceptional man who has dedicated his career to the national and international dialogue on disarmament and peace.

Female Genital MutilationStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Nina Grewal Conservative Fleetwood—Port Kells, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday was the International Day of Zero Tolerance to Female Genital Mutilation. Canada condemns this horrendous practice which violates the fundamental rights of women and girls, endangering their health and lives.

Status of Women Canada funds projects that support communities working to end culturally based violence against women and girls. In Canada's citizenship guide our message is clear: Canada's openness and generosity as a country does not extend to barbaric cultural practices such as female genital mutilation or other gender-based violence. Anyone who performs or participates in an act of genital mutilation may be charged with aggravated assault.

Let us all commit today to eradicating female genital mutilation in Canada and throughout the world.

Derelict VesselsStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Jean Crowder NDP Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, derelict vessels are a danger to our coastal communities whether they provide a safety hazard or the risk of environmental contamination.

Derelict vessels range from small pedal boats that slip free and become a hazard to navigation to large ships that may pose a risk to the environment from stored fuel on board.

Our current laws are a mish-mash of responsibility and do not obligate the ministers of transport and the environment, or DFO, to take action unless there is an imminent danger. That means it can take years to have a vessel removed.

The Islands Trust is campaigning to strengthen the laws on abandoned and derelict vessels. It worked with the Union of B.C. Municipalities to get a resolution passed at the UBCM September convention that read in part:

--petition the provincial and federal governments to develop a coordinated approach to the timely and adequate removal of all types of derelict and abandoned vessels, barges and docks in all situations--

I applaud the Islands Trust for its work on this issue and commit to working with it to finding a solution.

The EconomyStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Conservative Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, our government's top priorities consist of the economy and job creation for Canadians.

According to Statistics Canada, Canada has created more than 460,000 jobs since July 2009—the strongest job growth in the G7—and the economy has grown for five straight quarters.

The continued growth of employment in Canada once again shows that our economic action plan and tax reduction program are yielding positive results for Canadian families.

These are positive signs, but too many Canadians are still looking for employment and the global economic recovery remains very fragile.

An increasing number of Canadians are now realizing how dangerous the Liberal Party leader's economic agenda is. According to Times & Transcript, the Liberal Party is still stuck in its 1960s management mode. The Liberal Party leader and the welfare state approach—

The EconomyStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

Member for Beauce and Bill 101Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Louis Plamondon Bloc Bas-Richelieu—Nicolet—Bécancour, QC

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member for Beauce will stop at nothing to draw attention and score political points. On Friday he said that Quebeckers “don't need Bill 101 to protect the French language.” He was back at it again yesterday, saying that the legislation restricts “people's rights and freedom of choice”.

One would have to be completely out of touch with the reality of thousands of Quebeckers, not to mention the history of Quebec, to say such things. We are still seeing more and more attacks on the prominence of French. If the Lévesque government, with Camille Laurin leading the charge, had not had the courage to protect our linguistic heritage, the use, teaching and influence of our language would have suffered even greater degradation than it has. And the fight is not over.

Whether the member for Beauce likes it or not, there is a consensus in Quebec that Bill 101 must be maintained.

The Conservative GovernmentStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Justin Trudeau Liberal Papineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, during all of the tours we have made throughout Quebec over the past year, we have heard the same message over and over: Quebeckers are fed up—or as we say in Quebec, “pucapab”—with the Conservatives' incompetence and closed-mindedness.

We have had enough of their intimidation of women, public servants, journalists and artists. Enough of the waste of public funds on megaprisons and fake lakes. Enough of a Prime Minister who will not listen to anyone, anytime, anywhere. Enough of a Prime Minister who tramples on the values and priorities of Quebeckers. Enough of a backwards ideology that will set us back 50 years.

The Conservatives have put a big x on Quebec, and Quebeckers are fed up.

I invite all members and individuals, regardless of their party colours, to join the heartfelt cry of Quebeckers on the “pucapab” Facebook page.

What are we? We are “pucapab”!

Canadian Museum of ImmigrationStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Greg Kerr Conservative West Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, today our government, represented by the hon. Minister of National Defence, was proud to officially open Canada's new museum of immigration at Pier 21 in Halifax.

Until now, Canada has not had a national museum dedicated to recognizing the women, men and children from all over the world who chose Canada as their home.

The new museum is located at the historic Pier 21 site on the Halifax waterfront where today one in five Canadians can trace their lineage. Pier 21 is the second national museum outside our nation's capital.

No country in the world has benefited more than Canada from free and open immigration. As the Prime Minister said in Halifax at Pier 21 last June:

In every region...new Canadians make major contributions to our culture, economy and way of life....Anybody who makes the decision to live, work and build a life in our country represents the very best...

This museum is for them. Congratulations.

Canada-U.S. RelationsOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Liberal Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's negotiations with the United States will have a direct bearing on Canadian sovereignty and the privacy of Canadian citizens. That is obvious already. He talks to Americans, but so far not Canadians.

Therefore, we need to ask this. What is the Prime Minister prepared to bargain away? For example, with respect to the admissibility of visitors, immigrants and refugees, will Canada apply its own standards, which many Canadians believe are better than American standards, or will a Republican/Tea Party Congress make the rules?

Canada-U.S. RelationsOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Pontiac Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon ConservativeMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, it was an excellent Friday. The Prime Minister and the President were able to sign a joint declaration in which we both acknowledged our countries' sovereignty. We engaged to be able to work together for both our economic prosperity, job creation and at the same time ensure that we would be capable of putting in place the tools that would thwart any challenges from terrorism.

Quite honestly, I know it hurts the Liberal opposition when there is agreement between—

Canada-U.S. RelationsOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Wascana.

Canada-U.S. RelationsOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Liberal Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, still no answer. If we have a common entry and common exit system, does it not follow that Canada no longer has sovereign Canadian control over immigration and refugees? Canadians need to know what is at risk.

On the question of privacy, what additional personal information will Canadians be required to disclose and what are the guarantees against cases of abuse like Maher Arar?

Before surrendering Canadian borders, sovereignty and privacy, will the government bring full details of any proposed agreement before Parliament for debate and approval?

Canada-U.S. RelationsOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Pontiac Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon ConservativeMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we have indicated that the declaration signed by both the Prime Minister and the President is an excellent starting point for co-operation between both our governments.

We are looking forward, in the weeks and months ahead, to be able to turn the corner and go forward and to ensure that we protect the jobs we have, that we continue to increase our trade, our growth and, indeed, as I mentioned before, protect our borders.

Canada-U.S. RelationsOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Liberal Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, still no answer. The government's lack of candour breeds suspicion.

Could the Prime Minister at least guarantee minimum gains for Canada? For example, will he get rid of U.S. country of origin labelling? Will there be no more buy American policies? Will we get hassle free access for durum, beef, pork and softwood? Will passport requirements be removed? Will Canada be exempt from the patriot act? What are the guarantees?

Again I ask, will Parliament have the final say before any perimeter deal gets locked in?

Canada-U.S. RelationsOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Pontiac Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon ConservativeMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we are all reminded of the very poor record the previous government had in terms of its relations with the American government.

I understand it hurts that the Prime Minister and the President of the United States get along and want to work together.

Quebec Language PolicyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Liberal Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, with the passage of time and enactment of laws, Quebec has struck a balance between individual rights and the duty to preserve its linguistic and cultural identity. Over the years, it has found a way to achieve linguistic peace, as well as to protect and promote the French language. Today, the member for Beauce is attacking all of this. As usual, the Prime Minister is letting him.

Basically, the Prime Minister is attacking our language laws for the obvious purpose of dividing Canadians, because he is unable to stop himself.

Quebec Language PolicyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis ConservativeMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, that is completely false. Language issues are a provincial jurisdiction. If there is one government that respects provincial jurisdictions, it is the Conservative government.

Quebec Language PolicyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Liberal Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, what is worse is that he is saying it with a straight face.

In 1996, the Prime Minister told us that Quebec's language policy violated human rights. In 2002, he called it into question again and told us that Quebec's language policy prevented francophones from being bilingual. Today, his heir apparent, the member for Beauce, is completely out of line and the Prime Minister refuses to rein him in.

Is it because the Prime Minister did not understand what the member said, or because he is really in complete agreement with him?

Quebec Language PolicyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis ConservativeMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, speaking of keeping a straight face, it the hon. member's statements that are laughable. The member was speaking about constitutional peace. We have that peace thanks to the leadership of the Prime Minister and this Conservative government.

Harmonization of Sales TaxesOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Bloc Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, in a letter about the harmonization of the GST that was published in the newspapers, the Quebec finance minister, Raymond Bachand, said that the difference between the GST and the QST amounts to less than 1% of the GST tax base, which is well below the 5% authorized by the federal government. So, clearly, this is not the reason for the breakdown in negotiations.

Can the minister therefore explain why the Conservative government is stubbornly refusing to give Quebec $2.2 billion in compensation?

Harmonization of Sales TaxesOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis ConservativeMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, we have been clear from the start: Quebec will be treated the same as the other provinces. We began negotiations in good faith. These negotiations are well under way. The ball is now in Quebec's court. We would like to repeat once again that we are negotiating with the Government of Quebec, not the Bloc Québécois.

Harmonization of Sales TaxesOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Bloc Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the finance minister now has had to write to the newspapers because they cannot be spoken to.

Minister Bachand's letter goes on to say, “Work is sufficiently advanced to reach an agreement now in this regard.” In short, according to the Quebec finance minister, the federal government could compensate Quebec in the next budget.

What is the Conservative government waiting for? Why does it not settle this long-standing dispute?