House of Commons Hansard #127 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was organized.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Greg Thompson St. Croix—Belleisle, NB

Mr. Speaker, the government is changing its argument and its position. For a year now the government has been saying it will only make a decision when there is a formal application to proceed with a terminal. That application is now there. The government has not made up its mind and continues to dither.

Maybe the man here who knows something about shipping should stand up and state his position. Is he prepared to allow those tankers through internal Canadian waters, yes or no?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Jean Lapierre Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, it would be totally irresponsible on my part to make a decision before having a formal request made to the government. The member of Parliament is trying to make political hay with his question. There is no way we are going to get into this. We are going to look at the file when we have a formal application.

Public Works and Government Services Canada
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Louise Thibault Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Public Works and Government Services has just invited the bidders who were disadvantaged by the invitation to tender process to add the names of their firms to the list of Public Works' suppliers.

Are we to understand—I want to be clear—from the minister's statements that, following an investigation, he intends to treat the disadvantaged bidders in the same manner as the successful bidders, meaning that the disadvantaged bidders will be recognized as suppliers for the EnerGuide program?

Public Works and Government Services Canada
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Kings—Hants
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Scott Brison Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, we have finished the review of this procurement. Based on our re-evaluation of the original 22 unsuccessful bids, we have concluded that six can now be added to the list because they qualify for the procurement package. In fact, we have addressed this problem.

We have resolved the situation and we comply with the Official Languages Act at all times.

Grants and Contributions
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Alan Tonks York South—Weston, ON

Mr. Speaker, the HRSD standing committee recently reviewed the impact of new directives put in place in the awarding of grants and contributions in the Department of Human Resources and Skills Development. The committee heard dramatic testimony expressed by the voluntary sector that was heavily affected by these changes.

Would the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development please tell the House what her department has done to address the concerns expressed by this most critical non-governmental sector?

Grants and Contributions
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Newmarket—Aurora
Ontario

Liberal

Belinda Stronach Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and Minister responsible for Democratic Renewal

Mr. Speaker, we take the work that the voluntary sector does very seriously and we have put certain steps into place. We have put a task force in place that involves the deputy minister, the parliamentary secretary, the hon. member for Peterborough, and the voluntary sector to take a look at how we can streamline the process and make it fairer to the voluntary sector.

In addition to that we have put together an office for client satisfaction, and a fairness adviser to facilitate and strengthen the process, so that we have a stronger relationship with that voluntary sector.

Grants and Contributions
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Tony Martin Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Mr. Speaker, the billion dollar boondoggle of HRSDC led to a bureaucratic nightmare for the voluntary sector with the new call for proposal process.

The government's response to our committee investigation acknowledges the flawed process. Vulnerable clients were harmed along with the agencies who served them, but the government is finalizing a hundred more contracts that will make matters worse. It will not offer transitional funding to the agencies it has already harmed. Even Exxon had to clean up its oil spill.

When will the minister suspend these CFPs and fix this mess?

Grants and Contributions
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Newmarket—Aurora
Ontario

Liberal

Belinda Stronach Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and Minister responsible for Democratic Renewal

Mr. Speaker, a call for proposal was put in place for contracts over $500,000 because we are spending and investing taxpayers' money and we want to ensure that it is done wisely.

As I mentioned, we put a task force in place over and above the committee's recommendations to take a look at how we can streamline the administrative process and make it fairer to the voluntary sector.

Sponsorship Program
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Jason Kenney Calgary Southeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, I would like to give another opportunity to the hon. Minister of Public Works to either confirm or deny that there was a visit at the offices of his ministry some two weeks ago by officers of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to seize documents related to the Liberal sponsorship scandal and that these documents had not been furnished to the Gomery inquiry nor to the public accounts inquiry of the House.

Will he confirm or deny that?

Sponsorship Program
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Kings—Hants
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Scott Brison Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, I am informed that last week the RCMP contacted Public Works and in fact Public Works provided an invoice to the RCMP, an invoice that was provided twice to the Gomery inquiry previously.

This is part of over 10 million pages of documents that have been provided to the Gomery inquiry. Therefore, the hon. member, in his claim that this information was not provided to the Gomery inquiry, is in fact wrong. I would urge the hon. member to not play fast and loose with the truth here on the floor of the House of Commons.

Broadcasting
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Maka Kotto Saint-Lambert, QC

Mr. Speaker, after having accepted the CRTC's decision to grant two satellite radio licences, even if this decision makes Quebec and Canadian culture almost non-existent, the government is preparing to amend its policy in order to authorize the use of American satellites for broadcasting.

Why did the Minister of Canadian Heritage not impose a moratorium in this regard until the means could be found to drastically improve the francophone and Canadian content of these new media?

Broadcasting
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Jeanne-Le Ber
Québec

Liberal

Liza Frulla Minister of Canadian Heritage and Minister responsible for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his question.

Radio satellite technology is currently available. It is possible to obtain an emitter by giving one's name to a P.O. Box here, two blocks away, in Ottawa. So the grey market for this new technology is flourishing.

The decision was made with a view to allowing this new technology, which already exists. However, we must also understand that the two satellite companies asked the CRTC, on September 7, to amend the conditions of their licence in terms of Canadian content. Furthermore, they have asked the CRTC to be more rigorous in terms of francophone content, some—

Broadcasting
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Order, please. We have exhausted the list and so that ends question period.

There will now be tributes. I call upon the hon. Minister of Health.

Chuck Cadman
Oral Questions

September 28th, 2005 / 3:05 p.m.

Vancouver South
B.C.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, a few days ago I had the honour to present to Dona Cadman the maple leaf flag that was flying over the Peace Tower on the day of the funeral of her husband, my friend, Chuck Cadman.

While I was the only MP with her at the presentation, I know that the spirit of all members was with me because I know of the deep affection and respect that was, and still is, felt on all sides of the House for this very special man.

I knew Chuck very well. During my time as Attorney General of British Columbia, I met with him often to discuss ideas and initiatives to make our streets safer. He always sought justice with fairness. We became very good friends.

I was moved both by the personal loss that spurred his activism and his unswerving commitment to turn the loss of his son into positive action that would spare other parents the grief he and Dona had suffered.

But perhaps my fondest memory of Chuck will always be from the tumultuous last spring. We all remember how crazy it was here in Ottawa and in this House back then. Tensions and emotions ran high. Harsh words were often exchanged in this chamber and across the city.

Chuck, of course, played a key role in that unfolding drama, but what will always stay with me is not the role that he played, but the exemplary way in which he played it. Amid all the shouting and political strategizing in the glare of the media spotlight, Chuck was an island of dignified calm. He never lost sight of his principles or surrendered his independence of judgment. He never lost his sense of humour or his decency. He never lost his cool.

He stayed true to himself. He behaved with absolute dignity and integrity. Regardless of the high stakes involved, Chuck remained Chuck. He will always be in my memory, as he was in life, a loving father, a devoted husband, and a dedicated servant of his constituents and his country.

I say to Dona and Jodi that above all, we will remember Chuck as a friend, a friend we will miss a lot.

Chuck Cadman
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

John Cummins Delta—Richmond East, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is an honour for me today to rise to say a few words about our friend, Chuck Cadman.

Chuck was an ordinary guy who was born in Kitchener, Ontario, but grew up in North Bay. His dad was a stationary engineer. His mom emigrated from Holland in 1946 to marry his dad, whom she had met during the war.

After high school, Chuck spent a year or so making his living as a guitar player before heading west and ending up in Vancouver. There, in 1968, he met his wife, Dona. They were married in Clinton, Ontario, in August 1969 and returned to live in Vancouver in 1971. Daughter Jodi was born in 1973 and son Jesse in March 1976.

There is nothing special here: an ordinary guy from Ontario travels west to Vancouver, meets a girl, falls in love, marries and raises a couple of kids. I can relate to all of that, right down to being born in Ontario, having a wife in Vancouver and a father who was a stationary engineer, but on October 18, 1992, Chuck's, Dona's and Jodi's world fell apart. Sixteen year old Jesse was stabbed to death in a random attack.

The ultimate tragedy, the violent death of a child, has destroyed families, but not the Cadmans'. Through their sorrow, they reached out to help others devastated by similar hurts. They created the group called CRY, Crime, Responsibility and Youth, and worked tirelessly and selflessly to help those in need.

I did not know Dona and Chuck and Jodi at the time of Jesse's death, but I saw the news item on TV, heard the outrage on radio talk shows and read about it in the paper. Some months later, I invited Chuck to speak to a breakfast meeting put on by my constituency association, the first public meeting he spoke at after Jesse's death.

The impact of his words was profound. Here was a guy who spoke from the heart about the worst pain a parent can endure and he did it without bitterness and without the meanness of revenge. He spoke with the softness and firmness of a real Canadian hero who wanted to make this country a better place for everyone.

Chuck did not do it alone. He did it with the strength, determination and love that flowed from his dear wife, Dona, and his lovely daughter, Jodi.

At an election rally in 1997, Chuck told the crowd he was ready to go to Ottawa and fight for them but the jeans and ponytail would stay. Ottawa was not going to change Chuck Cadman.

Well, Chuck came to Ottawa, he fought for what was right, and the jeans and the ponytail stayed. Chuck did not change, but we who knew him have. We are all the better for knowing a great man, a great husband, a great father and a great Canadian.